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Ivey, iBBA Schulich, or Rotman?

A photo of Jeffhe Jeffhe
Hey guys!

As you all know, the deadline to decide which university to attend is coming up and by now, I'm sure the majority of you have already made that decision. To you I say congrats and I hope you find all the success in the world!

NOW PLEASE HELP ME! Right now, I can't decide between Ivey, iBBA Schulich and Rotman. It is not because I lack information about the schools (trust me, I did my research), but because each has their unique benefits to me in specific. I will list the schools and underneath them, their respective benefits. The rest is in your hands...

iBBA at Schulich
- The second-language course - I really need to brush up on my Mandarin...
- The mandatory international exchange program - my dream is a career abroad
- I live literally 2 minutes away from Campus - I save time and residence cost.
- A lot of my friends are going - I love them very much :)
- It's cheap - self explanatory.

The main problem I have with Schulich is the York U Campus. I've been living next to it for the past 5 years of my life and frankly, it's total crap compared to the campus of UofT or Western. The food is equally as bad.

Minor concerns: Schulich is known for accounting more than any other business discipline and accounting isn't really my thing. Schulich ranks below Ivey as a business school and evidently, it was much easier to get accepted into. However, it does rank higher than Rotman.

Rotman at UofT
- Trinity College - Required 2 supplementary essays, best college at UofT with some of the brightest people!
- International Relations (Trinity One Program) - Required a supplementary essay. 50 spot program and I extremely want to be a part of it.
- I love Downtown Toronto
- I heard Micheal Ignatiaff will be going back to teaching political science at UofT - I'm a huge fan of social science and so this is a priceless opportunity.
- Far enough from home to have my own freedom, but close enough to make frequent visits.

The main problem I have with Rotman is it's poor ranking as a business school. If Ivey is 1st tier along side Queens, and Schulich is 2nd tier, then Rotman is 3rd and that just isn't good enough. The fact that Rotman recruits more people than either Ivey or Schulich and has the lowest admission average requirement attests to that.

Minor concerns: The workload is heavy. It's very hard to achieve a high GPA. Rotman recruits a lot of foreign students. I went to their open house late last year, and the presentation was just dreadful. In contrast, the Ivey presentation was very impressive.
I don't know why I'm mentioning this, but I guess first impressions make a big difference.

Ivey at Western
- 2 years of social science (political science, philosophy, economics) before going into business! - Big social science person as previously mentioned. Plus, studying social science for two years will enrich my life in ways business just can't.
- Best business school in comparison to the two above, hands down. (I might just be ignorant, but this is what my research has led me to conclude) - I want the best possible education.
- Case study method - I love public speaking, so I think this kind of teaching method will work well for me.
- International exchange possibilities - My dream is a career abroad as mentioned before.
- Beautiful campus and I can't wait to see what the new Ivey building looks like! - Scenery and school vibe matters a lot to me. I go to university for the education, but also for the experience.
- Amazing alumni network - I guess this will prove helpful when I'm looking for a job.
- High recruitment by top firms - Makes life easier for me lol.

The main problem I have with Ivey is its high cost. Compared to iBBA and Rotman, the cost to attend Ivey is downright ridiculous. True, Ivey is better than the other two schools, but at the end of the day, is it really worth it? I mean, does it make that big of a difference which school I go to? Personally, I've always believed that success depends more on the individual than the school one attends, but I don't know.

Minor concerns: I might party too hard and my parents won't be there to stop me. I might die of starvation. I don't like the city of London as much as I like Toronto. That's about it.

Sorry, I know this was a very long post. If you took the time to read through it all, please know that I appreciate it very much. I can't thank you enough.





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20 replies
 
A photo of goldmansachs goldmansachs
I'm in the same position as you except in place of Rotman I'm highly considering McGill. After doing some thorough research in the past few weeks I would go to Ivey if I was in your situation. I know it seems like the common thing to say...but I'm basing this on being in the same position as you and considering/comparing what Schulich has to offer as well.

First of all you said you're not an accounting person, then Schulich is not for you. Also if you go to Ivey you will be able to meet new people (make new friends) so where your high school friends go shouldn't matter, it's more fun to meet them like a year or two after and see how everyone is doing. Also you'll have a much better time at Western because in the first two years you will enjoy what you are doing as you've mentioned Polital Sci, the course load will be much less and you can party it up and just relax you know! Also since you like public speaking I feel like the Ivey curriculum is more suitable for you because of the case based teaching.

You will have exchange opportunities at Ivey as well and you'll be able to brush up on your Mandarin by taking electives so yeah man go to Ivey!

Now...yes the cost is a good point and is one of the reasons it is holding me back. From what I've been hearing people say it's worth every penny because of the recruiting/networking/alumni support that you will receive. Your money is being spent wisely by Ivey admin and Ivey is very generous in bursaries and you can get loans from BMO + OSAP to offer you assistance.

Notice how I didn't even mention anything about Rotman, though I think Rotman is top tier in the graduate level, their undergrad level just doesn't match up to the other business programs. We all know that the program is a GPA killer, the program is more accounting focused and the opportunities are not the same. Oh and also why would you want to learn from a horrible politician who got only 30 seats even with a party like the Liberals backing him up?

Go Ivey man!
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A photo of goldmansachs goldmansachs
Sorry for my sentences being all over the place, it's late so I'm sleepy and tired.
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A photo of matti369 matti369
ivey
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A photo of Jeffhe Jeffhe
Thanks for advice guys, especially Goldmansachs. Your points were convincing, particularly the one about Iggnatiaff lol. It's true, he got demolished in this latest election, I won't be surprised if his prospective students use his defeat as a torture mechanism against him to demand for higher marks. Anyways, I'm pretty set on going to Ivey at the moment. If you decide to go too, tell me. I have a feeling we'll end up good friends. Thanks again.
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A photo of amhsirak amhsirak
My sitch is almost identical to yours! I don't know what you want to get into, but I was considering consulting, and maybe even finance. I'm looking for a program that:
- has great recruitment opportunities in consulting and finance
- provides the ability to network with a large pool of alumni
- gives students the opportunity to go on an exchange (to HEC, specifically)
- has a lot of clubs/conferences/competitions that students can take part in to stand out amongst their peers
- provides extensive summer internship opportunities to not only upper years, but also first and second years
Based on what you've said, I'd say do what I'm doing (Schulich then Ivey). But if you don't want to go through the hassle of reapplying, I'd also say Ivey.
SCHULICH
Pros:
1) Cheap; no debt incurred
2) iBBA degree (less common, global perspective, great for international marketability)
3) Guaranteed exchange (not partners with HEC at the undergraduate level, but that may change this summer)
4) Prestigious institution
5) Decent opportunities to become involved outside the classroom
Cons:
1) York (lack of school spirit)
2) Terrible placement records in consulting/finance
3) Not a huge alumni network
4) Not a whole lot of internship opportunities for first and second years, especially outside of accounting
Notes:
1) Small program
2) Located in Toronto (somewhat lol)

IVEY
Pros:
1) Best program in Canada, hands down
2) Great placement in finance/consulting
3) Prominent alumni, especially in the states
4) School spirit
5) Partners with HEC
6) Case study method
Cons:
1) Super expensive
2) No guarantee till third year.
3) If anything goes wrong, stuck in BMOS
4) Arts degree
5) No guarantee for exchange
6) No summer internship opportunities till HBA
Notes:
1) Large program
2) Don't know about opportunities to get involved outside of the classroom

The things I am concerned about are:
- How likely will it be to maintain an 80% at Schulich?
- How likely will it be to get into HBA?
I feel like I am gambling either way, but at the same time, at least if I don't maintain an 80%, I'll still be at Schulich. In terms of costs, this is what I came up with (everything included, even transportation):
Schulich: $36 356
BMOS/Ivey: $93 886
Schulich/Ivey: $80 178

What do you think I should do? IVEY OR SCHULICH?????????? :bounce:
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A photo of amhsirak amhsirak
Oh, and I forgot to add one more pro to Ivey:

YOU GET TO PARTY DURING YOUR FIRST TWO YEARS :cheers:

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A photo of Jeffhe Jeffhe

@amhsirak wrote
My sitch is almost identical to yours! I don't know what you want to get into, but I was considering consulting, and maybe even finance. I'm looking for a program that:
- has great recruitment opportunities in consulting and finance
- provides the ability to network with a large pool of alumni
- gives students the opportunity to go on an exchange (to HEC, specifically)
- has a lot of clubs/conferences/competitions that students can take part in to stand out amongst their peers
- provides extensive summer internship opportunities to not only upper years, but also first and second years
Based on what you've said, I'd say do what I'm doing (Schulich then Ivey). But if you don't want to go through the hassle of reapplying, I'd also say Ivey.
SCHULICH
Pros:
1) Cheap; no debt incurred
2) iBBA degree (less common, global perspective, great for international marketability)
3) Guaranteed exchange (not partners with HEC at the undergraduate level, but that may change this summer)
4) Prestigious institution
5) Decent opportunities to become involved outside the classroom
Cons:
1) York (lack of school spirit)
2) Terrible placement records in consulting/finance
3) Not a huge alumni network
4) Not a whole lot of internship opportunities for first and second years, especially outside of accounting
Notes:
1) Small program
2) Located in Toronto (somewhat lol)

IVEY
Pros:
1) Best program in Canada, hands down
2) Great placement in finance/consulting
3) Prominent alumni, especially in the states
4) School spirit
5) Partners with HEC
6) Case study method
Cons:
1) Super expensive
2) No guarantee till third year.
3) If anything goes wrong, stuck in BMOS
4) Arts degree
5) No guarantee for exchange
6) No summer internship opportunities till HBA
Notes:
1) Large program
2) Don't know about opportunities to get involved outside of the classroom

The things I am concerned about are:
- How likely will it be to maintain an 80% at Schulich?
- How likely will it be to get into HBA?
I feel like I am gambling either way, but at the same time, at least if I don't maintain an 80%, I'll still be at Schulich. In terms of costs, this is what I came up with (everything included, even transportation):
Schulich: $36 356
BMOS/Ivey: $93 886
Schulich/Ivey: $80 178

What do you think I should do? IVEY OR SCHULICH?????????? :bounce:




I think you shouldn't worry at all about not being able to maintain the required 80% in your first 2 years of BMOS. I have friends in the program right now and they tell me it's a piece of cake. For that reason, I recommend that you go straight into Western. The advantages of it include:
1. you won't have to move a second itme (it's a pain in the ass)
2. you can get involved in school clubs right away in your first year so that by the 3rd year, you might secure a leadership role.
3. you will know the Campus and the city of London inside out, which will make your time much more enjoyable. As opposed to spending all of your 3rd year at Ivey, after transferring from Schulich, trying to get used to everything.
4. you will have friends going into Ivey which is helpful as you do group activities and whatnot.

Why I don't recommend Schulich:
1. Applying for HBA in university is much harder to get in, there is a chance you won't.
2. I live right next to York University, and if there is one thing I'm sure of, it is that you won't enjoy the campus. Western is a beautiful campus, almost heavenly in comparison. School spirit isn't as strong at York as Schulich is kind of separated from the rest of the student body. Western is just better overall.
3. You are right that it might be cheaper to go to Schulich for the first 2 years, but I think the better student life experience at Western more than justifies the heftier price.
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A photo of waazup waazup
Could someone state exactly what the case study method is in undergrad and what happens in it? I googled it but never really got a solidified answer.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@waazup wrote
Could someone state exactly what the case study method is in undergrad and what happens in it? I googled it but never really got a solidified answer.


Have you done DECA?
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A photo of waazup waazup

@johnnycanuck wrote

@waazup wrote
Could someone state exactly what the case study method is in undergrad and what happens in it? I googled it but never really got a solidified answer.


Have you done DECA?


No, at least not yet.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@waazup wrote

@johnnycanuck wrote

@waazup wrote
Could someone state exactly what the case study method is in undergrad and what happens in it? I googled it but never really got a solidified answer.


Have you done DECA?


No, at least not yet.


http://cases.ivey.uwo.ca/cases/pages/home.aspx
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A photo of LALALALA LALALALA
I'm a bit confused, you need to maintain an 80% at Schulich?
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A photo of waazup waazup

@johnnycanuck wrote

@waazup wrote

@johnnycanuck wrote

@waazup wrote
Could someone state exactly what the case study method is in undergrad and what happens in it? I googled it but never really got a solidified answer.


Have you done DECA?


No, at least not yet.


http://cases.ivey.uwo.ca/cases/pages/home.aspx



That doesn't help man -_- ..just give me a 2 sentence brief. I have noticed "public speaking" is involved?
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@waazup wrote

@johnnycanuck wrote

@waazup wrote

@johnnycanuck wrote

@waazup wrote
Could someone state exactly what the case study method is in undergrad and what happens in it? I googled it but never really got a solidified answer.


Have you done DECA?


No, at least not yet.


http://cases.ivey.uwo.ca/cases/pages/home.aspx



That doesn't help man -_- ..just give me a 2 sentence brief. I have noticed "public speaking" is involved?



What is a Case Study?

A case study is a description of an actual administrative situation involving a decision to be made or a problem to be solved. It can a real situation that actually happened just as described, or portions have been disguised for reasons of privacy. Most case studies are written in such a way that the reader takes the place of the manager whose responsibility is to make decisions to help solve the problem. In almost all case studies, a decision must be made, although that decision might be to leave the situation as it is and do nothing.



http://plato.acadiau.ca/courses/Busi/IntroBus/CASEMETHOD.html
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
If you can manage to go to the Dean's Welcome Reception today(18:00-20:00), you will, I think, have a pretty clear idea of the school. You might like it. You might hate it. Decide from that.
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A photo of yingxiliao521 yingxiliao521
or Harlem Community College
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A photo of waazup waazup

@johnnycanuck wrote


What is a Case Study?

A case study is a description of an actual administrative situation involving a decision to be made or a problem to be solved. It can a real situation that actually happened just as described, or portions have been disguised for reasons of privacy. Most case studies are written in such a way that the reader takes the place of the manager whose responsibility is to make decisions to help solve the problem. In almost all case studies, a decision must be made, although that decision might be to leave the situation as it is and do nothing.



http://plato.acadiau.ca/courses/Busi/IntroBus/CASEMETHOD.html



K, perhaps I already knew that part, I had a rough understanding of this.
What I am asking is:
When is it done, are all students involved, do you have an option of not being a part of it, what happens in a normal case study, How long is it, where is it, Is it marked heavily, etc.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@waazup wrote

@johnnycanuck wrote


What is a Case Study?

A case study is a description of an actual administrative situation involving a decision to be made or a problem to be solved. It can a real situation that actually happened just as described, or portions have been disguised for reasons of privacy. Most case studies are written in such a way that the reader takes the place of the manager whose responsibility is to make decisions to help solve the problem. In almost all case studies, a decision must be made, although that decision might be to leave the situation as it is and do nothing.



http://plato.acadiau.ca/courses/Busi/IntroBus/CASEMETHOD.html



K, perhaps I already knew that part, I had a rough understanding of this.
What I am asking is:
When is it done, are all students involved, do you have an option of not being a part of it, what happens in a normal case study, How long is it, where is it, Is it marked heavily, etc.


It depends. Case studies are used by pretty much every university, and in a variety of classes (and not just for business either).

Ivey uses them the most (and writes the most on their own of a Canadian university) so perhaps that would be a better question for Richard or someone in Ivey (or you could ask Queen'sHSL2011, etc.)
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A photo of brrap brrap

@johnnycanuck wrote

@waazup wrote

@johnnycanuck wrote


What is a Case Study?

A case study is a description of an actual administrative situation involving a decision to be made or a problem to be solved. It can a real situation that actually happened just as described, or portions have been disguised for reasons of privacy. Most case studies are written in such a way that the reader takes the place of the manager whose responsibility is to make decisions to help solve the problem. In almost all case studies, a decision must be made, although that decision might be to leave the situation as it is and do nothing.



http://plato.acadiau.ca/courses/Busi/IntroBus/CASEMETHOD.html



K, perhaps I already knew that part, I had a rough understanding of this.
What I am asking is:
When is it done, are all students involved, do you have an option of not being a part of it, what happens in a normal case study, How long is it, where is it, Is it marked heavily, etc.


It depends. Case studies are used by pretty much every university, and in a variety of classes (and not just for business either).

Ivey uses them the most (and writes the most on their own of a Canadian university) so perhaps that would be a better question for Richard or someone in Ivey (or you could ask Queen'sHSL2011, etc.)




1) Every course at Ivey (except for a couple accounting classes) are case based.
2) All students are involved and you are marked on your contribution to in-class discussions regarding the case. You are expected to prepare the case ahead of time in order to do so.
3) And no, you cannot opt out of the case method. If you want to do that, you shouldn't be going to Ivey.
4) Cases can range from 2 pages to 30 pages.
5) No idea what you mean by where is it
6) The entire program is centred around the case method, meaning that your mark is based on how well you learn through the case method.
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