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McGill Engineering (with big scholarship) vs U of T Engineering Science

A photo of anonymous1996 anonymous1996
Trying to decide between McGill Engineering (General, thinking of going into Chemical the year after) and U of T's EngSci program.
Here's the catch: McGill's offering me a $60 000 scholarship over 4 years, as compared to U of T's measly $2000 one-time-only award.
Help?
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@anonymous1996 wrote
Trying to decide between McGill Engineering (General, thinking of going into Chemical the year after) and U of T's EngSci program.
Here's the catch: McGill's offering me a $60 000 scholarship over 4 years, as compared to U of T's measly $2000 one-time-only award.
Help?


depends on which engineering program you are doing? I think
If I were you, I would probably choose Mcgill

can you change engineering major in 2nd year at Mcgill? or is it only for general?
and i heard if you have chosen general, you have to do 5years of undergraduate not sure though
I also want to change to chemical engineering if i can so....
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A photo of ktel ktel
I would take McGill hands down. Although I did turn down a $50,000 scholarship at the University of Calgary to go to the University of Alberta. I ended up getting a similar amount of scholarship money in the end though. U of T is notoriously stingy with their scholarship money.

maelong is wrong, a lot of engineering programs have general 1st years and are still only 4 year degrees. There's a fair bit of overlap between disciplines as far as math, chemistry and physics goes.
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A photo of imaginaryengineer imaginaryengineer

@anonymous1996 wrote
Trying to decide between McGill Engineering (General, thinking of going into Chemical the year after) and U of T's EngSci program.
Here's the catch: McGill's offering me a $60 000 scholarship over 4 years, as compared to U of T's measly $2000 one-time-only award.
Help?




60 grand......unless u have personal issues preventing u from mcgill...u really shouldnt turn it down for eng sci
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@ktel wrote
I would take McGill hands down. Although I did turn down a $50,000 scholarship at the University of Calgary to go to the University of Alberta. I ended up getting a similar amount of scholarship money in the end though. U of T is notoriously stingy with their scholarship money.

maelong is wrong, a lot of engineering programs have general 1st years and are still only 4 year degrees. There's a fair bit of overlap between disciplines as far as math, chemistry and physics goes.




wow $50,000 what was your average?

so are you saying for mcgill 1st year can be general and choose engineer major in the 2nd year? because that doesn't make sense to me i mean if you choose chemical engineering in the 1st year then you must learn at least something regards to chemical engineering stuff right? haha
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A photo of ktel ktel
I had a 95% or above average in high school I think, don't really remember. Kept up a 3.9 GPA in university, which is why I kept getting more scholarships.

Yes McGill seems to have a general 1st year and you choose your major in your 2nd year and the degree is 4 years. Lots of schools do this. I don't know how other schools structure their first year if it's not general, but my general first year was just math, physics, chemistry, computer programming, and a general engineering course. All engineering disciplines have some common requirements
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@ktel wrote
I had a 95% or above average in high school I think, don't really remember. Kept up a 3.9 GPA in university, which is why I kept getting more scholarships.

Yes McGill seems to have a general 1st year and you choose your major in your 2nd year and the degree is 4 years. Lots of schools do this. I don't know how other schools structure their first year if it's not general, but my general first year was just math, physics, chemistry, computer programming, and a general engineering course. All engineering disciplines have some common requirements



no like ut and uw, mcgill doesn't have general 1st year that i'm sure of
for mcgill, i think general means like track one or eng sci for ut
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A photo of ktel ktel
McGill's situation is also complicated given that there are CEGEP and non-CEGEP streams. But I have looked at the curriculum for the disciplines for the non-CEGEP streams, and it seems like they all take the same courses in first year. So if you're entering from high school, you take a general first year.
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A photo of maelong maelong

@ktel wrote
McGill's situation is also complicated given that there are CEGEP and non-CEGEP streams. But I have looked at the curriculum for the disciplines for the non-CEGEP streams, and it seems like they all take the same courses in first year. So if you're entering from high school, you take a general first year.




what's cegep? I tried to get the answer from the school so i emailed them but all i got was she's out of the office till may 3rd
are you sure 1st year is general, then what's the point of choosing engineering program now and why is average admission all different if we can just switch to the one that's hard to get in in the second year?
I also want to switch to chemical engineering if that's possible, do you think that's possible?
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A photo of plato plato
I would take the McGill scholarship. Unless you're heading to grad-school, UT's engineering science program is just a big marketing scam.

Ask yourself this question: why don't more universities offer an engineering science program?
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A photo of anonymous1996 anonymous1996
@maelong: It actually is a five-year degree if you do a general first-year, since they consider it to be "Year 0". I believe you choose your major the year after.
As it is, I took a closer look at the McGill engineering website, and I don't qualify for General Engineering (too many APs), so I'm going straight into Chemical Engineering.

@plato: I actually am planning to go to grad school, but I'm undecided as to whether it'll be law or medicine.

My biggest worry is that I know U of T's program is way more renowned, and I'm wondering if that'll affect my grad school application. Also, how much of a difference is there between McGill's engineering program and EngSci?
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A photo of ktel ktel
CEGEP is a Grade 13 sort of thing for students in Quebec. Often treated as equivalent to the first year of university.

Look at the course work for the general first year program:
http://www.mcgill.ca/engineering/degrees/general/

Look at the first year courses for chemical engineering, for example:
https://secureweb.mcgill.ca/engineering/sites/mcgill.ca.engineering/files/sc-chemical-non-cegep.pdf

They're identical. Hence why I don't think it adds an extra year to the program at all. It's intended for high school students, not CEGEP students, which is why it's treated as a different thing.

Now what's the point of the general first year program? Who knows. Keep in mind that you only get your free pick of 2nd year discipline if you get over a 3.0 GPA. If your GPA is lower you're not guaranteed to get into the discipline you want. Perhaps that's why many students choose to go straight into their discipline of choice. Given the course requirements are the same for all the disciplines in the first year, I would imagine if you want to switch disciplines that wouldn't be a problem.

@anonymous1996: I wouldn't worry too much about undergraduate school reputation affecting your graduate school admission. Especially if only comparing McGill and U of T, which are both highly reputable universities. I had no problem getting into UTIAS (U of T Aerospace) with an undergraduate degree from U of A and limited research experience.
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Oh thanks for the link and the info
I just compared electronic eng and chem eng schedules and 1st years is almost identical
except for electrician engineering, there is no
Complementary Studies Group B (HSSML) - 1 Complementary Studies Group A (Impact) Complementary Studies Group B (HSSML) - 2
what is CS? will i be able to take these CS in the 1st year if i ask them to?
and on http://www.mcgill.ca/ece/undergrad/information/ee/2011-2012/2011-12ee8
there are
XXXX xxx (3) Humanities and Social Sciences 1 *
XXXX xxx (3) Impact of Technology on Society **
what are they? can i take CS instead? ???
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A photo of computerengineer computerengineer
wow 60k is HUGE. McGIll is a very respected uni too. Mcgil hands down LOL how did u manage that scholarhips
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A photo of ktel ktel

@maelong wrote


Oh thanks for the link and the info
I just compared electronic eng and chem eng schedules and 1st years is almost identical
except for electrician engineering, there is no
Complementary Studies Group B (HSSML) - 1 Complementary Studies Group A (Impact) Complementary Studies Group B (HSSML) - 2
what is CS? will i be able to take these CS in the 1st year if i ask them to?
and on http://www.mcgill.ca/ece/undergrad/information/ee/2011-2012/2011-12ee8
there are
XXXX xxx (3) Humanities and Social Sciences 1 *
XXXX xxx (3) Impact of Technology on Society **
what are they? can i take CS instead? ???



CS stands for "Complementary Studies", so it's a non-engineering elective, typically. So their schedules aren't really all that different at all.
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@ktel wrote

@maelong wrote


Oh thanks for the link and the info
I just compared electronic eng and chem eng schedules and 1st years is almost identical
except for electrician engineering, there is no
Complementary Studies Group B (HSSML) - 1 Complementary Studies Group A (Impact) Complementary Studies Group B (HSSML) - 2
what is CS? will i be able to take these CS in the 1st year if i ask them to?
and on http://www.mcgill.ca/ece/undergrad/information/ee/2011-2012/2011-12ee8
there are
XXXX xxx (3) Humanities and Social Sciences 1 *
XXXX xxx (3) Impact of Technology on Society **
what are they? can i take CS instead? ???



CS stands for "Complementary Studies", so it's a non-engineering elective, typically. So their schedules aren't really all that different at all.




so will i be able to take complementary studies?
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@anonymous1996 wrote
@plato: I actually am planning to go to grad school, but I'm undecided as to whether it'll be law or medicine.



Unless you're planning to get into patent law and intellectual property, an engineering degree will not greatly benefit your law program. Biomedical engineering might help you after med-school, if you're interested in that specialization.

If you're planning to go into law or medicine, then you would benefit from choosing a program that would serve you to that end, poli-sci or health sciences, for example. Other students taking the appropriate program will have a significant advantage over you in grad school.

If you like engineering then it wont be a total loss, but you could accomplish more by specializing sooner. Additionally, think about what exactly you think will allow you to make up your mind, and how you can get there sooner.



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A photo of ktel ktel
^ I have friends from engineering who went into law school or med school and they weren't at a disadvantage. If they were good enough to get in, they're good enough to do well.


@maelong wrote

so will i be able to take complementary studies?



Yes, that's what the schedule says, isn't it?
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@ktel wrote
^ I have friends from engineering who went into law school or med school and they weren't at a disadvantage. If they were good enough to get in, they're good enough to do well.


@maelong wrote

so will i be able to take complementary studies?



Yes, that's what the schedule says, isn't it?



no it doesn't say that
i'm sorry to bother you but can you find a link saying that too?
so if i get a good gpa in the 1st year i can chage to chem eng?
man i wish i can contact the school
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A photo of iliketurtles iliketurtles
60K? That's too good to turn down imo. If you wanna go into law or medicine, why the interest in engineering?
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@ktel wrote
^ I have friends from engineering who went into law school or med school and they weren't at a disadvantage. If they were good enough to get in, they're good enough to do well.



On the medical side, I disagree. My friends and family who took health sciences were much better prepared than those who had no significant biology background. That's not to say both groups didn't do well in the end. But the group that didn't take pre-med had to work much harder to achieve the same results.
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A photo of anonymous1996 anonymous1996
@plato: The reason I'm not going into polisci or pre-med is because I'm not certain as to whether I want to go to law school (in which case, I probably would go into IP or patent law) or med school (if I decide to minor in biomed engineering). Heck, I might even just go to graduate school for engineering if it turns out I like the field.
@iliketurtles: I like sciences, and I want a flexible degree that I can actually use if it turns out at the end of the day that I'm sick of school and I don't want to go to grad school :P

I'm worried that I won't get the same sort of research/co-op opportunities in Mcgill that I would in Toronto. Also, I'm not sure how I feel about the fact that I'll have to live on my own after first-year in Mcgill...
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A photo of iliketurtles iliketurtles

@anonymous1996 wrote
@plato: The reason I'm not going into polisci or pre-med is because I'm not certain as to whether I want to go to law school (in which case, I probably would go into IP or patent law) or med school (if I decide to minor in biomed engineering). Heck, I might even just go to graduate school for engineering if it turns out I like the field.
@iliketurtles: I like sciences, and I want a flexible degree that I can actually use if it turns out at the end of the day that I'm sick of school and I don't want to go to grad school :P

I'm worried that I won't get the same sort of research/co-op opportunities in Mcgill that I would in Toronto. Also, I'm not sure how I feel about the fact that I'll have to live on my own after first-year in Mcgill...


Than take McGill. U of T's EngSci is ridiculously hard and very few people go to med/law school after EngSci. Last year, someone from EngSci said only 1 person gets in every couple years or so, so it's sort of ridiculous to go into EngSci thinking you'll get into medical/law so early, no offence. Although I usually don't like to agree with the whole "_____ university is 134613x harder than ______ university", I'd stay as far away as possible from EngSci if you wanted to do med/law.
Also, McGill's co-op and research opportunities are probably just as good as U of T's, they put a lot of focus on research. However ktel said in a previous post that getting research positions at research-focused schools are hard because of the amount of students that want to do research as well, just something to keep in mind.
Also, living on your own will be fine. Move into an apartment with a couple friends of campus, that's what most people do.
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A photo of ktel ktel
@maelong: you can find most of the info if you spend a bit of time on the website and if you apply a bit of common sense (I don't mean to be rude, I find a lot of the worried high school students tend to not believe what they read for some reason)

@anonymous1996: I wouldn't worry too much about co-op/research opportunities. There will be plenty of those at McGill. In fact, a bit of anecdotal evidence that I have seen may make me think it's significantly more difficult to get research experience at U of T. The prof I TA for had over 60 applications for 2-4 summer research spots in his robotics lab. Almost all EngScis want to go to grad school, so it can be a lot more difficult to get experience as the competition is higher. Where I did my undergrad (U of A), research wasn't a popular route, so it was very easy for me to get excellent experience.
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A photo of tukr tukr
Wow you serious? Super jealous! Go to McGill!!!
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A photo of ousia ousia
60 grand np
yea you are set for life
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