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Need some guidance with university.

A photo of elyk96 elyk96
Alright, so I'm 15 years old, and ever since I can remember I've been stressing about my education.

My first question, is which grades actually matter?
I've heard a multitude of stories, from grades 9-12 being a big deal. I've also heard that the only grades universities will look at is grades 11-12.

I've also heard that you show your six best classes? This worries me, because I've slacked some classes that I disliked, and I don't want that to effect my odds of getting into a university. Right now I'm standing at a 90 in Grade 11 academic English, but in my computer engineering course I ended up with a 74. Will this effect my odds of admission into a university, regardless of the education? For example, law, considering it has nothing to do with the engineering of computers. Basically, I'm just curious on how universities will judge my grades/how they look at them.

Secondly, I've heard that AP classes help A LOT. I'd definitely be up for AP classes, except my school has none. How much does this damage my chance of admittance into universities?

I've also been checking up on athletic scholarships. But I'm not really sure which sport would be the best, in terms of chances of earning a scholarship. Considering I'm half a semester ahead in school, I've debated taking a semester off school in order to train myself for whichever sport I decide. It would be like a normal school day, except I'd just dedicate it to that sport. Would this be a good way to up my chances of getting a scholarship?
The sports I've been considering are rugby, football (soccer), and track.

In all, what makes or breaks admittance into a decent university.
Thanks!
Hope this was understandable.

Btw, I live in Ontario, if that changes anything.
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A photo of ktel ktel
Which grades matter: Grade 11 grades matter for early admission, grade 12 grades matter for normal admission (for Canadian universities)

Which classes: Your top 6 INCLUDING prerequisites. So if English, bio and chem were prereqs for your program, these 3 would be looked at, and then your next 3 highest marks (typically U courses although I believe 1 or 2 M courses is allowed). So if you have a low mark in computer engineering, and have other classes with higher marks, it won't matter.

AP: Doesn't matter, you won't get preferential admittance to Canadian universities if you took AP.

Sports: Are you saying you're not already playing any of the sports you listed at a high level? You can't just take a semester off and become an awesome athlete, it's not going to work that way. Athletic scholarships are rare and not worth a lot of money in Canada. Take rugby, for example, which I have played for 5 years at the varsity level. Not only do we not get scholarships we also have to pay to play at some schools.
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A photo of elyk96 elyk96
Alright, thanks, knowing that only six courses matter really relieves some stress. Knowing I can focus on the courses that actually matter I have no problem.


About the sports, the ones I listed are the sports I'm already good at. I was just curious if that would be a proper step to take in order to take things to the next level. I'm already half a semester ahead, so it wouldn't put me behind. But so scholarships are worthless in Canada? I was hoping it would be an opportunity to save money, put myself in even better shape, and relieve some stress.

Anyways, thank you very much for the help.

Also, would it be best for me to stay at universities within my province/country?
I'm most likely pursuing some sort of medical/health, law, or film studies. So which universities would you recommend? I'd predict around an 87 average, though let's say I end up with a 90 which is my goal. Which schools would be recommended for me?
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A photo of Jsonga Jsonga

@elyk96 wrote
Alright, thanks, knowing that only six courses matter really relieves some stress. Knowing I can focus on the courses that actually matter I have no problem.


About the sports, the ones I listed are the sports I'm already good at. I was just curious if that would be a proper step to take in order to take things to the next level. I'm already half a semester ahead, so it wouldn't put me behind. But so scholarships are worthless in Canada? I was hoping it would be an opportunity to save money, put myself in even better shape, and relieve some stress.

Anyways, thank you very much for the help.

Also, would it be best for me to stay at universities within my province/country?
I'm most likely pursuing some sort of medical/health, law, or film studies. So which universities would you recommend? I'd predict around an 87 average, though let's say I end up with a 90 which is my goal. Which schools would be recommended for me?


Typically to obtain an athletic scholarship you would need to already be playing at a very high level (as mentioned earlier) and get scouted by the school so taking a semester off school probably isn't the best idea.

When the time comes only you can decide what school you want to go to. Recommendations regarding which schools would be good options for you would be meaningless at this point because you're two years from applying. Med/law/film studies are also completely different from each other, so maybe that question would be better off asked in a year or two. Keep in mind that you'll be more or less getting the same undergrad education wherever you go.
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A photo of elyk96 elyk96
Hmm, well the sport I'd probably say that I can play on a high level, would be soccer.
I'm not on the schools soccer team though, as it was either soccer or rugby.

But I do play extra-curricular soccer. From what I see though, in Ontario Rugby starts at grade 9, and I'm only in Grade 10.

I'm decent at track, but I'm not the 'best' so I guess it would be pointless to pursue and improve on?

Anyways, would it still be too late to pursue Rugby, and should I just go for soccer?
As well, which sport would be the easiest/give the best offers? I just have a huge dream of becoming a professional athlete, though I know the chances are rare, so I'm still focusing on my academics of course. I just find a scholarship would help me financially, physically, and support this unlikely dream.


And so practically what your saying with the courses is that I shouldn't stress about them yet, until I get to higher level courses to see if I actually enjoy them?
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A photo of ktel ktel
Athletic scholarships are not the way to go. Having good grades and being involved in extracurriculars (leadership, sports, volunteering) and getting scholarships that way is way better. It's what I did and received around $50,000 in scholarships during my undergrad (I'm now in grad school).

Playing a varsity sport is amazing though, and I would highly recommend it. Yes it can be stressful, and for some people it can affect their ability to do well in school, but for me it was great. I still got good grades, had a team full of friends, and got to play rugby at a very high level. I will say there are certain varsity sports that are easier to get on the team than others. Rugby at some schools (for example, U of T) isn't very popular and it's easier to make the varsity team than it would be for soccer. Track is usually easy enough to get involved in but only the best get to compete.

I don't think it's too late to pursue rugby, I only started getting really good in grade 12. But I think your mindset is totally wrong, you need to pick the sport you enjoy. Because the path to becoming a high performance athlete is rocky and filled with ups and downs, and if you don't love the sport, it will be very easy to quit when it sucks.
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A photo of Jsonga Jsonga

@elyk96 wrote
And so practically what your saying with the courses is that I shouldn't stress about them yet, until I get to higher level courses to see if I actually enjoy them?


No, I'm saying you're only in grade ten and while it's good to be thinking ahead, you should be enjoying yourself at school rather than stressing over things that you shouldn't be stressing over. You specified that you're interested in med/law/film studies, which are completely different things, so figure out what you want to do first before getting caught up in acceptances and scholarships, etc.

And ktel is right, I'm not trying to discourage you from achieving your goals but getting an athletic scholarship is really tough, especially considering the fact that you only play at an extra curricular level.

Good luck.
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A photo of ktel ktel
Athletic scholarships in Canada are nothing like they are in the States. They can only cover tuition and fees, nothing else (if the university is part of the CIS). So you're looking at max $8000, whereas in the US you can get a full ride. Add into that the limited athletics budget for most schools and the preferential treatment towards certain sports (football and hockey) and you're not looking at anything big.
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A photo of elyk96 elyk96

@ktel wrote
Athletic scholarships are not the way to go. Having good grades and being involved in extracurriculars (leadership, sports, volunteering) and getting scholarships that way is way better. It's what I did and received around $50,000 in scholarships during my undergrad (I'm now in grad school).

Playing a varsity sport is amazing though, and I would highly recommend it. Yes it can be stressful, and for some people it can affect their ability to do well in school, but for me it was great. I still got good grades, had a team full of friends, and got to play rugby at a very high level. I will say there are certain varsity sports that are easier to get on the team than others. Rugby at some schools (for example, U of T) isn't very popular and it's easier to make the varsity team than it would be for soccer. Track is usually easy enough to get involved in but only the best get to compete.

I don't think it's too late to pursue rugby, I only started getting really good in grade 12. But I think your mindset is totally wrong, you need to pick the sport you enjoy. Because the path to becoming a high performance athlete is rocky and filled with ups and downs, and if you don't love the sport, it will be very easy to quit when it sucks.



Oh no, don't get me wrong. I have a love for athletics in all, and track as well as soccer have been sports I absolutely love. I've just started Rugby, but I've gained a liking. Though I'll have to play it for a while longer to see if its really what I'm into.

And so athletic scholarships are nothing major? I guess there would be no chance of being picked up by an American university, or?

Anyways, so for scholarships I should go and help coach teams? I helped coach a junior team in my town last year for soccer. I heard maxing out your volunteer hours (1000) is a great way to earn a scholarship? Is that true? So practically, the best thing that involves sports, and a good scholarship would be coaching and contributing to local sports and activities?
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A photo of ktel ktel
No athletic scholarships are nothing major. I received WAY more in academic/community involvement based scholarships than I ever did on athletic scholarships. There's not no chance of being picked up by an American university, although you would probably know if you were at that level or not. I don't know how good you are.

Maxing out your hours isn't the best plan of attack. It's all about QUALITY not QUANTITY. So things that show leadership, dedication, commitment, etc. If coaching is what you want to do, then do it.
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A photo of elyk96 elyk96

@ktel wrote
No athletic scholarships are nothing major. I received WAY more in academic/community involvement based scholarships than I ever did on athletic scholarships. There's not no chance of being picked up by an American university, although you would probably know if you were at that level or not. I don't know how good you are.

Maxing out your hours isn't the best plan of attack. It's all about QUALITY not QUANTITY. So things that show leadership, dedication, commitment, etc. If coaching is what you want to do, then do it.




Yeah, I'd have to say I'm good but I'm not full out amazing on that level. But I know I have the dedication required to be on that level.

So would the half semester idea be completely worthless? I mean, I'm not doing it just for a scholarship, though it would be nice. But I'm doing it just to be athletic, and improve at the sport, scholarship or no scholarship. But I think it would help me reach that level of 'amazing' I'd want to achieve. Would that not be a major boost, with that much attention on athletics?

And with the hours, that makes sense. Thanks for the help so far, you've all been tremendous help.
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A photo of Jack555 Jack555
hi elyk,
can i ask what program or universities you are interested in applying to in university
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A photo of ktel ktel
Yeah a semester off can make a big difference. One summer during the university when the recession hit and I couldn't find a summer job I just trained everyday. I became a WAY better player that summer and all of a sudden went from a sub to a starter at the varsity team, as well as playing provincially and stuff.
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A photo of aquarius aquarius

@elyk96 wrote
Alright, so I'm 15 years old, and ever since I can remember I've been stressing about my education.

My first question, is which grades actually matter?
I've heard a multitude of stories, from grades 9-12 being a big deal. I've also heard that the only grades universities will look at is grades 11-12.

I've also heard that you show your six best classes? This worries me, because I've slacked some classes that I disliked, and I don't want that to effect my odds of getting into a university. Right now I'm standing at a 90 in Grade 11 academic English, but in my computer engineering course I ended up with a 74. Will this effect my odds of admission into a university, regardless of the education? For example, law, considering it has nothing to do with the engineering of computers. Basically, I'm just curious on how universities will judge my grades/how they look at them.

Secondly, I've heard that AP classes help A LOT. I'd definitely be up for AP classes, except my school has none. How much does this damage my chance of admittance into universities?

I've also been checking up on athletic scholarships. But I'm not really sure which sport would be the best, in terms of chances of earning a scholarship. Considering I'm half a semester ahead in school, I've debated taking a semester off school in order to train myself for whichever sport I decide. It would be like a normal school day, except I'd just dedicate it to that sport. Would this be a good way to up my chances of getting a scholarship?
The sports I've been considering are rugby, football (soccer), and track.

In all, what makes or breaks admittance into a decent university.
Thanks!
Hope this was understandable.

Btw, I live in Ontario, if that changes anything.



I took 3 APs - did not help me in anyway to get admission. I would suggest take AP only if you want more challenging curriculum.

If you enjoy sports , then play it but don't go into it thinking you want to get a scholarship out of it. I'm provincial level swimmer believe me when I say there isn't really anything out there. One of my colleague has 3 Nationals and got one offer only of $5K but couldn't be combined with entrance scholarship but another colleague with 4 Nationals got into a competitive program with a very low mark but paid in full residence. If you look at University scholarship section, the most at least the ones I have seen is $500 to $1000 max and only offered to one or two people.

Just do things you enjoy and not being focused on the scholarship part ; might come in handy if you are applying for a program that is competitive that needs supplemantary application.

Good Luck!
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A photo of elyk96 elyk96

@Jack555 wrote
hi elyk,
can i ask what program or universities you are interested in applying to in university




Either film studies or some sort of medical, something involving health to say the least. My third choice is law. I haven't really picked any universities, though I did some research last year but I've forgotten it all. Would you recommend any certain ones? I currently reside in Ontario if that changes anything.



@ktel, Can it hurt me that bad? I'm already a semester ahead, so I wouldn't be behind when I return. Can you think of any negative effects that might follow this idea?

@aquarius I would only want a more challenging curriculum if it would raise my odds of admission. And oh, well the whole athletic scholarship thing seems disappointing. Should I still perhaps take a semester off to enhance my sports talent? I'm already a semester ahead so I wouldn't be behind when I returned. Or would it be pointless.
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A photo of ktel ktel
I think there would be way better things you could do with a semester off. Like work and save money for school. I think you would be pretty bored pretty fast if all you did was sports for an entire semester. I think you would be more inclined to just waste your time and sleep in and do relaxing things. The summer I didn't work and trained was great but I was super bored and wasted a lot of time.
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