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A photo of brady23 brady23
Hey guys,

I don't know if I want to go into biomedical sciences or a science/business degree at Waterloo with a specialization in Biology or Chemistry.

I want a career that isn't based on research and lab work. Therefore, I think a biomedical science major would be better than Science & Business, even though I really love Business.

Are there any non-research and non-lab careers I can get from a Biomedical Science major?

I'm thinking a Biomedical Science degree may be better for me, because it is more hands on and less research and lab based. I don't want to be stuck washing beakers or looking in a microscope for my whole life.

Also, is there any career that a chemistry or biology major can get that a biomedical science major can not get?
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Dude just so you know Biomedical Sciences is like a really research intensive science field and it's based on laboratory work.

Here I got this from York's Website so I don't ramble in my own explanation:

"Biomedical scientists study biological processes and diseases with the ultimate goal of developing effective treatments and cures. Biomedical research requires careful experimentation by many scientists, including biologists and chemists. Discovery of new medicines and therapies requires careful scientific experimentation, development, and evaluation."

Reference: [url]http://futurestudents.yorku.ca/program/biomedical_science[/url]

I know what Biomedical Science is just that description above justifies that it truly is a research lab based discipline.
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A photo of brady23 brady23

@Medic93 wrote
Dude just so you know Biomedical Sciences is like a really research intensive science field and it's based on laboratory work.

Here I got this from York's Website so I don't ramble in my own explanation:

"Biomedical scientists study biological processes and diseases with the ultimate goal of developing effective treatments and cures. Biomedical research requires careful experimentation by many scientists, including biologists and chemists. Discovery of new medicines and therapies requires careful scientific experimentation, development, and evaluation."

Reference: [url]http://futurestudents.yorku.ca/program/biomedical_science[/url]

I know what Biomedical Science is just that description above justifies that it truly is a research lab based discipline.



Yeah, I thought life science was a research based discipline, had no idea biomedical sciences was. But, I can still go into physiotherapy, optometry, medicine, dentistry, or other allied health careers like a respiratory therapist or an audiologist.

But I guess a life science degree would take me there too.

Would you say biomedical science is better than biochemistry or chemistry if I don't want a research or lab based career? Although, I wouldn't mind being a lab technician in a hospital.

Thanks for your response! :D
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@brady23 wrote

@Medic93 wrote
Dude just so you know Biomedical Sciences is like a really research intensive science field and it's based on laboratory work.

Here I got this from York's Website so I don't ramble in my own explanation:

"Biomedical scientists study biological processes and diseases with the ultimate goal of developing effective treatments and cures. Biomedical research requires careful experimentation by many scientists, including biologists and chemists. Discovery of new medicines and therapies requires careful scientific experimentation, development, and evaluation."

Reference: [url]http://futurestudents.yorku.ca/program/biomedical_science[/url]

I know what Biomedical Science is just that description above justifies that it truly is a research lab based discipline.



Yeah, I thought life science was a research based discipline, had no idea biomedical sciences was. But, I can still go into physiotherapy, optometry, medicine, dentistry, or other allied health careers like a respiratory therapist or an audiologist.

But I guess a life science degree would take me there too.

Would you say biomedical science is better than biochemistry or chemistry if I don't want a research or lab based career? Although, I wouldn't mind being a lab technician in a hospital.

Thanks for your response! :D




I'm in no position to tell anyone what major to study but this might of interest to you, take a look at the current in demand careers in Health Care by looking at this link below. See anything that may interest you?

[url]http://www.sickkids.ca/CareersVolunteering/Find-a-Career/Search-Jobs/all-jobs.html[/url]

If you need any further questions to be answered keep them coming I'm available!
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
There are so many. The four that most people know well are medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and optometry, all of which offer six-figure average salaries. Less popular ones, which also do not tend to pay as well, include veterinarian, chiropractor, physical therapist, occupational therapist, dietitian/nutritionist, audiologist, speech/language pathologist, respiratory therapist, cardiovascular technician, medical lab technologist, radiation therapist, clinical research associate, regulatory affairs professional, medical writer, pharmaceutical sales representative, clinical neuropsychologist, and you could always do an after-degree accelerated nursing program (and end up as an RN).

Chemistry is the more employable undergraduate degree, as few people get a degree in chemistry, yet chemical research is just as large as biological research. As far as life science majors go, I don't think any one is really more employable than any other; just major in what interests you.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@mynameismattgotmlgo wrote
There are so many. The four that most people know well are medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and optometry, all of which offer six-figure average salaries. Less popular ones, which also do not tend to pay as well, include veterinarian, chiropractor, physical therapist, occupational therapist, dietitian/nutritionist, audiologist, speech/language pathologist, respiratory therapist, cardiovascular technician, medical lab technologist, radiation therapist, clinical research associate, regulatory affairs professional, medical writer, pharmaceutical sales representative, clinical neuropsychologist, and you could always do an after-degree accelerated nursing program (and end up as an RN).

Chemistry is the more employable undergraduate degree, as few people get a degree in chemistry, yet chemical research is just as large as biological research. As far as life science majors go, I don't think any one is really more employable than any other; just major in what interests you.



Good points, people can't just limit themselves to the big 4 (Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, & Optometry). The other ones you mentioned are also pretty good and do have comfortable salaries.
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A photo of brady23 brady23

@mynameismattgotmlgo wrote
There are so many. The four that most people know well are medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and optometry, all of which offer six-figure average salaries. Less popular ones, which also do not tend to pay as well, include veterinarian, chiropractor, physical therapist, occupational therapist, dietitian/nutritionist, audiologist, speech/language pathologist, respiratory therapist, cardiovascular technician, medical lab technologist, radiation therapist, clinical research associate, regulatory affairs professional, medical writer, pharmaceutical sales representative, clinical neuropsychologist, and you could always do an after-degree accelerated nursing program (and end up as an RN).

Chemistry is the more employable undergraduate degree, as few people get a degree in chemistry, yet chemical research is just as large as biological research. As far as life science majors go, I don't think any one is really more employable than any other; just major in what interests you.



Thank you! I think a Biomedical Science degree might be better because I'll have a lot of options when I graduate like the ones you mentioned, even though I might have to go to graduate school, where as if I went into Chemistry or Biomedical Engineering, my scope is limited and if the field becomes oversaturated I'll be screwed.

Thanks a lot for your help!
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A photo of brady23 brady23

@Medic93 wrote

@brady23 wrote

@Medic93 wrote
Dude just so you know Biomedical Sciences is like a really research intensive science field and it's based on laboratory work.

Here I got this from York's Website so I don't ramble in my own explanation:

"Biomedical scientists study biological processes and diseases with the ultimate goal of developing effective treatments and cures. Biomedical research requires careful experimentation by many scientists, including biologists and chemists. Discovery of new medicines and therapies requires careful scientific experimentation, development, and evaluation."

Reference: [url]http://futurestudents.yorku.ca/program/biomedical_science[/url]

I know what Biomedical Science is just that description above justifies that it truly is a research lab based discipline.



Yeah, I thought life science was a research based discipline, had no idea biomedical sciences was. But, I can still go into physiotherapy, optometry, medicine, dentistry, or other allied health careers like a respiratory therapist or an audiologist.

But I guess a life science degree would take me there too.

Would you say biomedical science is better than biochemistry or chemistry if I don't want a research or lab based career? Although, I wouldn't mind being a lab technician in a hospital.

Thanks for your response! :D




I'm in no position to tell anyone what major to study but this might of interest to you, take a look at the current in demand careers in Health Care by looking at this link below. See anything that may interest you?

[url]http://www.sickkids.ca/CareersVolunteering/Find-a-Career/Search-Jobs/all-jobs.html[/url]

If you need any further questions to be answered keep them coming I'm available!



Thanks for that link! Surprised by the number of research jobs, the lab technician, the quality systems specialist, and medical transcriptionist interests me, but I'm not sure if these are careers that require a biomedical science degree.
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