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Non-research Science Careers

A photo of brady23 brady23
Hey guys,

I was wondering, if I specialized in Chemistry of biology, what kinds of careers could I pursue that aren't related to labs or research?

For example, if I became a member of the Canadian Society for Chemistry, what careers would be open to be that are not lab or research based?
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
The thing with undergraduate degrees in science, most of them just educate you on a specific or overall discipline within the sciences. You go to school to learn basic laboratory skills, but mostly knowledge in that field through lectures, seminars, and tutorials.

Undergraduate science degrees are usually a stepping stone to go onto further education and i think that is perfectly fair because if you are going into science it means you want to keep continuing your education whether it be going onto graduate studies, professional schooling, and such. The employability of just an undergraduate science degree isn't really high, that's why you should already have a mindset that you are willing to take upon more schooling.

If you want a career straight out of University go into Nursing, Engineering, or Accounting.

Just take this into account, if you have a passion for something (realistic) then pursue it and don't give up. Don't worry about people saying that it's unemployable or a dead end field, if you rather enjoy what you do as opposed to go to a job you hate but simply make a lot of money I'd definitely go for what I truly like.

As for careers that are not lab or research based, that's kind of difficult because science is a lot about discovery and testing. If anyone else here is more knowledgeable about this field they can probably best answer your questions. :cheers:
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
None. Non-research science is an oxymoron.
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A photo of brady23 brady23

@Medic93 wrote
The thing with undergraduate degrees in science, most of them just educate you on a specific or overall discipline within the sciences. You go to school to learn basic laboratory skills, but mostly knowledge in that field through lectures, seminars, and tutorials.

Undergraduate science degrees are usually a stepping stone to go onto further education and i think that is perfectly fair because if you are going into science it means you want to keep continuing your education whether it be going onto graduate studies, professional schooling, and such. The employability of just an undergraduate science degree isn't really high, that's why you should already have a mindset that you are willing to take upon more schooling.

If you want a career straight out of University go into Nursing, Engineering, or Accounting.

Just take this into account, if you have a passion for something (realistic) then pursue it and don't give up. Don't worry about people saying that it's unemployable or a dead end field, if you rather enjoy what you do as opposed to go to a job you hate but simply make a lot of money I'd definitely go for what I truly like.

As for careers that are not lab or research based, that's kind of difficult because science is a lot about discovery and testing. If anyone else here is more knowledgeable about this field they can probably best answer your questions. :cheers:



Thanks for your response. I noticed you're a newcomer on these forums and I'm glad you joined, you're so helpful!

So what are you planning to do? I think I'm going to do a biomedical science degree and try to get into some type of health career. I was thinking of biomedical engineering, but then I would have to go to Ottawa because I'm only interested in the mechanical side of biomedical engineering, Mcmaster and Ryerson only do the electrical part of Biomedical Engineering.

But I think what you're saying makes sense. There's a difference between learning science and actually working in science, and I think I prefer the first one.

So a chemistry or biology degree would probably be useless to me. I just hope I can get into some type of health care career after Biomedical Science, and then I'll know I made the right choice. But I wouldn't mind a lab career, as long as it is not related to research because then I would know what I am doing, so I wouldn't mind working for a science lab company like in the show Better off Ted.

Thanks for all your help! :D
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A photo of brady23 brady23

@Xiaohaha wrote
None. Non-research science is an oxymoron.



That is so true. Learning science is one thing, but getting a career in science is completely different. Even my science teacher said researching and lab work was not her thing so she became a teacher.

I mean you could go into sales, but I don't really want to do that. But the more I think about it, doing something in the lab is not that bad, as long as it is not related to research.
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@brady23 wrote

@Medic93 wrote
The thing with undergraduate degrees in science, most of them just educate you on a specific or overall discipline within the sciences. You go to school to learn basic laboratory skills, but mostly knowledge in that field through lectures, seminars, and tutorials.

Undergraduate science degrees are usually a stepping stone to go onto further education and i think that is perfectly fair because if you are going into science it means you want to keep continuing your education whether it be going onto graduate studies, professional schooling, and such. The employability of just an undergraduate science degree isn't really high, that's why you should already have a mindset that you are willing to take upon more schooling.

If you want a career straight out of University go into Nursing, Engineering, or Accounting.

Just take this into account, if you have a passion for something (realistic) then pursue it and don't give up. Don't worry about people saying that it's unemployable or a dead end field, if you rather enjoy what you do as opposed to go to a job you hate but simply make a lot of money I'd definitely go for what I truly like.

As for careers that are not lab or research based, that's kind of difficult because science is a lot about discovery and testing. If anyone else here is more knowledgeable about this field they can probably best answer your questions. :cheers:



Thanks for your response. I noticed you're a newcomer on these forums and I'm glad you joined, you're so helpful!

So what are you planning to do? I think I'm going to do a biomedical science degree and try to get into some type of health career. I was thinking of biomedical engineering, but then I would have to go to Ottawa because I'm only interested in the mechanical side of biomedical engineering, Mcmaster and Ryerson only do the electrical part of Biomedical Engineering.

But I think what you're saying makes sense. There's a difference between learning science and actually working in science, and I think I prefer the first one.

So a chemistry or biology degree would probably be useless to me. I just hope I can get into some type of health care career after Biomedical Science, and then I'll know I made the right choice. But I wouldn't mind a lab career, as long as it is not related to research because then I would know what I am doing, so I wouldn't mind working for a science lab company like in the show Better off Ted.

Thanks for all your help! :D




No problem, I'm willing to help at anytime I'm available and I'll answer any questions I can even if it means that I need to do some research to confirm what I already know is accurate. I'm planning on going to University of course for an undergraduate degree in either Psychology, Neuroscience, & Behaviour or Kinesiology with a minor in Health Studies. Then planning on going to College to become a licensed A-EMCA (Primary Care Paramedic) within the province of Ontario, I'm doing that because I want a career that I can interact with patients regardless. Depending on how well I do in my undergraduate studies I will apply for graduate school or professional schooling in either (Psychology, Neuroscience, & Behaviour), Kinesiology, Public Health & Safety, Occupational Therapy, or Physical Therapy. So I have a really good idea of what I want to do, I don't want to limit myself to just one thing. Remember, keep your options open:!:

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A photo of brady23 brady23

@Medic93 wrote

@brady23 wrote

@Medic93 wrote
The thing with undergraduate degrees in science, most of them just educate you on a specific or overall discipline within the sciences. You go to school to learn basic laboratory skills, but mostly knowledge in that field through lectures, seminars, and tutorials.

Undergraduate science degrees are usually a stepping stone to go onto further education and i think that is perfectly fair because if you are going into science it means you want to keep continuing your education whether it be going onto graduate studies, professional schooling, and such. The employability of just an undergraduate science degree isn't really high, that's why you should already have a mindset that you are willing to take upon more schooling.

If you want a career straight out of University go into Nursing, Engineering, or Accounting.

Just take this into account, if you have a passion for something (realistic) then pursue it and don't give up. Don't worry about people saying that it's unemployable or a dead end field, if you rather enjoy what you do as opposed to go to a job you hate but simply make a lot of money I'd definitely go for what I truly like.

As for careers that are not lab or research based, that's kind of difficult because science is a lot about discovery and testing. If anyone else here is more knowledgeable about this field they can probably best answer your questions. :cheers:



Thanks for your response. I noticed you're a newcomer on these forums and I'm glad you joined, you're so helpful!

So what are you planning to do? I think I'm going to do a biomedical science degree and try to get into some type of health career. I was thinking of biomedical engineering, but then I would have to go to Ottawa because I'm only interested in the mechanical side of biomedical engineering, Mcmaster and Ryerson only do the electrical part of Biomedical Engineering.

But I think what you're saying makes sense. There's a difference between learning science and actually working in science, and I think I prefer the first one.

So a chemistry or biology degree would probably be useless to me. I just hope I can get into some type of health care career after Biomedical Science, and then I'll know I made the right choice. But I wouldn't mind a lab career, as long as it is not related to research because then I would know what I am doing, so I wouldn't mind working for a science lab company like in the show Better off Ted.

Thanks for all your help! :D




No problem, I'm willing to help at anytime I'm available and I'll answer any questions I can even if it means that I need to do some research to confirm what I already know is accurate. I'm planning on going to University of course for an undergraduate degree in either Psychology, Neuroscience, & Behaviour or Kinesiology with a minor in Health Studies. Then planning on going to College to become a licensed A-EMCA (Primary Care Paramedic) within the province of Ontario, I'm doing that because I want a career that I can interact with patients regardless. Depending on how well I do in my undergraduate studies I will apply for graduate school or professional schooling in either (Psychology, Neuroscience, & Behaviour), Kinesiology, Public Health & Safety, Occupational Therapy, or Physical Therapy. So I have a really good idea of what I want to do, I don't want to limit myself to just one thing. Remember, keep your options open:!:





Thanks a lot! No more questions, you've been a great help to this forum! Biomedical Sciences will keep my options open, which I guess is the reason why I'm going to choose it over Chemistry and Biomedical Engineering!

Good luck to you!
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