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Part time job vs. Work/study program

A photo of kaytotz kaytotz
As the title implies I am questioning whether to keep my current part time job during first year or quit to enter the work/study program.

PROS
Part time job
- more money
- may look better on resume? (If I stay during the school year then I will have worked there for a year and a half =stability)
- never have to work late (mall closes at 9pm)

Work/study
- on campus
- merges better with school schedule
- better job prospects/easier

CONS
part time job
- further away (30 mins by bus)
- have to work 20+ hours
- no relevant skills (it's just cashiering lol)

work/study
- salary cap (I think it's $1000/term)
- difficult to land jobs?
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9 replies
 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
I've tried both. Granted, this wasn't at Waterloo, and this is limited to my own experience. For what it's worth, I think that the work-study program, if you qualify for it, makes it incredibly easy for anyone with a bit of job experience to get hired, and probably easier for anyone without to get hired too. It's especially useful if you want experience in a career or academic field that you want to enter after graduation, since a lot of departments have openings reserved for work-study students. The salary is lower than what part-time jobs typically offer, but I had such a fun time and flexible hours with my work-study job that I didn't mind working for minimum wage at all. (Plus, I got an amazing reference letter from my work-study employer afterward, which I'm pretty sure helped me land a spot in my first choice for grad school.)

I don't see how a part-time job will look better on a resume than a work-study job. Both are considered work experience. In fact, if your work-study job is more relevant to your field of study, it may even look better than a part-time job.

If you can find a way to do both, I highly recommend it. Best of luck.
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A photo of kaytotz kaytotz
Interesting input, Spengler. I know that a work-study position (if I can get a more academic oriented position) will look better, but I'm thinking mostly when I apply to co-op I might look unstable since I have switched jobs quite frequently prior to my current job. I would have to quit my present job, then do work/study, then a summer job, then work/study again until first co-op term.

And I definitely don't see doing both, especially for first year at least. Thanks again for the response!
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A photo of SparklingBG SparklingBG
As someone who has done both at the same time, I would say they are both great experiences but PERSONALLY for myself, the work-study helped me more in the sense that i was able to find out about other positions oncampus with the position I already had,
2. it was easier for me to get connected with both students as well as staff on campus,
3. when I tried to apply to other jobs both on campus, I could always relate it back to my work-study position = more likely to get hired for them.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@kaytotz wrote
I know that a work-study position (if I can get a more academic oriented position) will look better, but I'm thinking mostly when I apply to co-op I might look unstable since I have switched jobs quite frequently prior to my current job. I would have to quit my present job, then do work/study, then a summer job, then work/study again until first co-op term.



Personally, I don't think you should worry about appearing "unstable" on your resume at this point in your life. Certainly, I've never had that problem with my resume (I've job hopped quite a bit, but also kept at a couple jobs because they keep hiring me back). In fact, I would recommend you branch out a bit and develop as many skills as you can, or at least the ones that will benefit you in terms of getting a good co-op placement. In my experience, the more varied job experiences you have, the more you have to talk about when you market yourself to an employer during an interview.
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A photo of kaytotz kaytotz
Well, it turns out that I am able to completely cover my first year so I probably won't be eligible for the work/study program anyway ha

But thanks for the responses! I think I'm ultimately going to stick with my current job for at least the first semester than do varied on-campus jobs like residence/special events tour guides, etc and volunteering.
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A photo of BusterBaxter BusterBaxter
Keep in mind, not all student jobs at universities are work-study. A job like working at the library is often not considered work-study, so consider looking/applying for those jobs :)
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A photo of kseguin kseguin
I know I liked doing the work study program mainly because it was on campus and it worked with my schedule....like I had to walk 30 seconds to the main building of my school because my campus is extremely small...the only thing I didn`t like was the fact that there was 1000$ cap on each semester (because obviously as a student I need more money a semester than 1000$ to survive)....I can`t say about a part time job during university because I haven`t had one
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