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Part-time Job

A photo of cherrypie725 cherrypie725
I'm going into grade 12 this year and I'm wondering if it would really be worthwhile for me to get a part-time job during the school year. Let me start off by saying that I don't really need the money... both of my parents make a decent amount of money and are willing/generous enough to pay for my enitre university tuition and living expenses. The money I would earn would just be spending money of my own, mostly saving for when I go away to university.

My problem is that I'm already pretty busy. I would say that I do at least 15-20 hours of ECs/week, and maintaining a 95%+ average is very important to me, especially for grade 12. Oh, also I'm in IB, which means a lot of work.

So I'm just wondering, for anyone who has had a part-time job, especially in grade 12, do you think it's really worth it? Did it affect your marks, or did you have to cut back on ECs?

Also, for the more competitive programs that require a resume, is having a job a big advantage? Like if I had to cut back on some ECs to accomodate a job, would they look down on that? Is it "bad" if you've never had a job during the school year?

Sorry for all these questions, and thanks in advance! :compress:
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A photo of ktel ktel
You are me in grade 12. I maintained a 95%+ average, was in IB, and probably did a similar amount of ECs if not more. I had a part-time job for several months but had to take a break from it for a month because of IB exams. It didn't really affect my marks or ECs but it did stress me out a bit more. It was nice to have some extra money though.

I would say your ECs will look more important to competitive programs than some crappy first job would.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
This question's already been asked several times. Search the forums.
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A photo of ktel ktel
Each individual's circumstance is somewhat different, and they deserve to ask their own question
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Yeah, they can do that by going to a mass-thread and reading and posting there.
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A photo of cherrypie725 cherrypie725

@ARMY101 wrote
This question's already been asked several times. Search the forums.


Honestly the only other somewhat related thread I found was people asking which jobs are best for HS students, and most of them were discussing summer jobs, so that doesn't really apply. But if you're thinking of any others that you'd like to point out I'd appreciate it.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Then let me summarize by saying yes, it's incredibly worth it and it should be required that you maintain a job of at least 15-20 hours a week. I maintained two full time jobs throughout most of high school and all of university, and I graduated from both with an A average.
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A photo of ktel ktel

@ARMY101 wrote
Then let me summarize by saying yes, it's incredibly worth it and it should be required that you maintain a job of at least 15-20 hours a week. I maintained two full time jobs throughout most of high school and all of university, and I graduated from both with an A average.



Or you can not work and do extracurriculars and sports and get good grades and get lots of scholarships. Yay.

I actually think I can lose some of my grad school funding if I work more than 10 hours a week.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@ktel wrote

@ARMY101 wrote
Then let me summarize by saying yes, it's incredibly worth it and it should be required that you maintain a job of at least 15-20 hours a week. I maintained two full time jobs throughout most of high school and all of university, and I graduated from both with an A average.



Or you can not work and do extracurriculars and sports and get good grades and get lots of scholarships. Yay.

I actually think I can lose some of my grad school funding if I work more than 10 hours a week.



I had plenty of scholarships while still working. Working is a requirement to become a productive member of society.
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A photo of cherrypie725 cherrypie725

@ARMY101 wrote

@ktel wrote

@ARMY101 wrote
Then let me summarize by saying yes, it's incredibly worth it and it should be required that you maintain a job of at least 15-20 hours a week. I maintained two full time jobs throughout most of high school and all of university, and I graduated from both with an A average.



Or you can not work and do extracurriculars and sports and get good grades and get lots of scholarships. Yay.

I actually think I can lose some of my grad school funding if I work more than 10 hours a week.



I had plenty of scholarships while still working. Working is a requirement to become a productive member of society.


Personally I feel that some of my community leadership roles (as volunteer work) allow me to make a much more valuable contribution to society than I would as a cashier or burger flipper, which is why I'm hesitant to get a job if it means I might have to sacrifice some of those activities.
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@cherrypie725 wrote
Personally I feel that some of my community leadership roles (as volunteer work) allow me to make a much more valuable contribution to society than I would as a cashier or burger flipper, which is why I'm hesitant to get a job if it means I might have to sacrifice some of those activities.


Completely backwards. You should be working first then volunteering with any time left over. Besides, helping homeless people is worth less than helping people get their fries at McDonald's.
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A photo of cherrypie725 cherrypie725

@ARMY101 wrote
Completely backwards. You should be working first then volunteering with any time left over. Besides, helping homeless people is worth less than helping people get their fries at McDonald's.


How so?
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A photo of kraken kraken
You can always give homeless people fries. Best of both worlds?
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A photo of cherrypie725 cherrypie725

@kraken wrote
You can always give homeless people fries. Best of both worlds?


I like how you think.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
No offence cherrypie, but I find IB unreal. Seven people in my district graduated with an average of exactly 99% and all of them are IB. I don't know, but I think there is a secret behind those bragging people saying, "I'm an IB student."
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A photo of cherrypie725 cherrypie725

@econnected wrote
No offence cherrypie, but I find IB unreal. Seven people in my district graduated with an average of exactly 99% and all of them are IB. I don't know, but I think there is a secret behind those bragging people saying, "I'm an IB student."


Yeah I get what you're saying. I hear a lot of people (especially on SA) talking about how they have super high averages in IB.

The way it works at my school is that marks are not curved at all in grade 11. Just to give you an idea of the grade distribution, most of my class averages are in the high 60s. No one fails (since we're all pretty motivated students) but very few people even have 90 averages.

In grade 12, our marks are curved using an OSSD mark conversion scale, which is probably how some people get those super high averages.

Regardless of marks, IB is still a significant additional time commitment compared to many regular programs, which is partly why I posted this question in the first place!
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@cherrypie725 wrote

@econnected wrote
No offence cherrypie, but I find IB unreal. Seven people in my district graduated with an average of exactly 99% and all of them are IB. I don't know, but I think there is a secret behind those bragging people saying, "I'm an IB student."


Yeah I get what you're saying. I hear a lot of people (especially on SA) talking about how they have super high averages in IB.

The way it works at my school is that marks are not curved at all in grade 11. Just to give you an idea of the grade distribution, most of my class averages are in the high 60s. No one fails (since we're all pretty motivated students) but very few people even have 90 averages.

In grade 12, our marks are curved using an OSSD mark conversion scale, which is probably how some people get those super high averages.

Regardless of marks, IB is still a significant additional time commitment compared to many regular programs, which is partly why I posted this question in the first place!



I guess I was correct. I knew there was some kind of secret, but the "conversion scale" thing blew me off. Really? No wonder all the top scholars in my district are IB students. I agree with you though, IB is very useful, especially on a resume. However, I have to admit that with all this comes the stereotype that all IB students = smarty pants (I hope that this is really a stereotype and not always true).
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A photo of cherrypie725 cherrypie725
Not everyone in IB is super smart. I would say most people in my grade are above average intelligence, but most aren't really "gifted". You can get decent marks in IB if you work hard, which most people do.

But yeah I agree that the conversion thing should be more uniform. I don't think any student in my program has even gotten 99% in one course, let alone as an average. It seems pretty unfair that my 95% is the highest in my grade at my school, while at other schools it would be pretty standard. That's life, I guess.
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A photo of Haala93 Haala93
Although I don't have a reply to your question ... I hope you don't mind if I add a question to what you asked. I'm also going to grade 12 and am doing a university course alongside my high school courses and want to know if I should also get a job. I do need the money because there is no guarantee that my parents will be able to pay of my university tuition but they are willing to do what they can. But I also need to acquire 3 years worth of Volunteer Work and extra-curricular activities because as I have stated in a previous thread I started that I'm new to the country and have basically lost everything I've worked for since 9th grade. So yes, would you all advise me to get a job on top of that or just focus on the load I have at the moment? (sorry if it seems like I'm ranting but I figure that's all relevant to the choice I need to make.) Thank you in advance.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@cherrypie725 wrote

@ARMY101 wrote
Completely backwards. You should be working first then volunteering with any time left over. Besides, helping homeless people is worth less than helping people get their fries at McDonald's.


How so?


Helping productive people be more productive is better than helping unproductive people. Sorry, that's just the cold reality.
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A photo of cherrypie725 cherrypie725
Volunteering to help the homeless (or anyone else in need, for that matter) makes society as a whole more productive/functional. McDonalds is certainly not a requirement for productivity. Homeless people, however, do need basic necessities i.e. food and shelter to survive.

Personally, I'm thankful to live in a country where many people in need are able to get help, either from the government or from charities which rely on volunteers. Sure, it isn't a perfect system and there are still lots of people who fall through the cracks, so to speak, but it's definitely better than nothing.
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A photo of ktel ktel
Homeless people aren't necessarily unproductive. Many of them work for a living. Ever heard of the working homeless?
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@ktel wrote
Homeless people aren't necessarily unproductive. Many of them work for a living. Ever heard of the working homeless?


No? If you're working, even on minimum wage, you should have enough money for a decent apartment.
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A photo of CailynBrown CailynBrown
There are many people who work in such low wages that they could arrange only a their food and other minimum requirements. They couldn't arrange money to own an apartment also. Their number might be less, but such people do exist.
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A photo of cherrypie725 cherrypie725

@CailynBrown wrote
There are many people who work in such low wages that they could arrange only a their food and other minimum requirements. They couldn't arrange money to own an apartment also. Their number might be less, but such people do exist.


Especially if they have children/others to take care of.

Also, this thread has gone so off topic lol. I don't even volunteer to help homeless people.
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A photo of ktel ktel

@ARMY101 wrote

@ktel wrote
Homeless people aren't necessarily unproductive. Many of them work for a living. Ever heard of the working homeless?


No? If you're working, even on minimum wage, you should have enough money for a decent apartment.



Not in some of the more expensive cities. Not to mention there may be other factors at play.
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