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Physics 4U Help !

A photo of Beejeong Beejeong
A iron ball swings on the end of a rigid steel rod at a constant speed in a vertical circle of radius. What is the direction of the acceleration of the mass at points X and Y?

The diagram is..

A circle with a centre point. The steel rod is connected to the centre on one side, and the iron ball on the other. The iron ball is spinning counterclockwise. Point X is on the right side of the circle (3 o'clock), and point Y is on the left (9 o'clock)

Hope you guys can help me out. Greatly appreciated..
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20 replies
 
A photo of smandair smandair
Acceleration is always towards the centre of the circle.
Eg Gravity; it's the same situation.
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A photo of Beejeong Beejeong
If the rod SNAPS at the bottom of the circle, describe the motion of the ball.
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A photo of cyynthiia cyynthiia
Centripetal acceleration!
Points the same way as your centripetal force, which is always towards the centre of the circle.

Not sure about the rod snapping. I know I learnt this before but I totally forgot.
But once the rod snaps.. it's no longer spinning in a circle, so isn't the only and net force acting on it just gravity.. making the acceleration point downwards? Don't quote me on that one, not 100% sure.
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A photo of Nyx Nyx
I agree with cyynthiia :)
Also, since the rod snaps at the bottom of the circle, the ball doesn't go flying off on a tangent on either the left or the right and falls straight down.
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A photo of Beejeong Beejeong

@Nyx wrote
I agree with cyynthiia :)
Also, since the rod snaps at the bottom of the circle, the ball doesn't go flying off on a tangent on either the left or the right and falls straight down.



Oh noo.. I f-ed that up on the test..
it's soo obvious now that you say itt.

erryday
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A photo of Nyx Nyx
It's OK, it gets better. You still have time to make up for it :)
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A photo of cyynthiia cyynthiia
LOL Don't sweat it.
Happens to be all the time, I only realize it AFTER the test.
I just got 68 on my physics test, life goes on.
Thank god that was my lowest test and it got omitted. :D
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A photo of tigerwoods tigerwoods

@Beejeong wrote

@Nyx wrote
I agree with cyynthiia :)
Also, since the rod snaps at the bottom of the circle, the ball doesn't go flying off on a tangent on either the left or the right and falls straight down.



Oh noo.. I f-ed that up on the test..
BSSS, it's soo obvious now that you say itt.

I PHUCKED UP! I PHUCKED UP!
erryday




Wait. What? It makes no sense that the ball would fall straight down if the rod snaps at the bottom of the circle.


The ball is being spun around in a circle with constant v, so centripetal accel is v^2/r towards the centre of the circle. If this ball is spinning in deep space, away from any gravitational wells, then for both the 3 o'clock and 9 o'clock positions, the acceleration is v^2/r towards the centre of circle. However, if this ball is spinning on earth in the vertical plane, the acceleration is the sum of the centripetal acceleration towards the centre of the circle and the acceleration due to gravity towards the earth.


If the rod snaps at the bottom of the circle, the ball will follow the path of a parabolic projectile on earth with v_initial pointing directly right and the acceleration being g.

What kind of physics are you people doing at your creationist schools? :scratch:
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A photo of Beejeong Beejeong

@tigerwoods wrote
Wait. What? It makes no sense that the ball would fall straight down if the rod snaps at the bottom of the circle.


The ball is being spun around in a circle with constant v, so centripetal accel is v^2/r towards the centre of the circle. If this ball is spinning in deep space, away from any gravitational wells, then for both the 3 o'clock and 9 o'clock positions, the acceleration is v^2/r towards the centre of circle. However, if this ball is spinning on earth in the vertical plane, the acceleration is the sum of the centripetal acceleration towards the centre of the circle and the acceleration due to gravity towards the earth.


If the rod snaps at the bottom of the circle, the ball will follow the path of a parabolic projectile on earth with v_initial pointing directly right and the acceleration being g.

What kind of physics are you people doing at your creationist schools? :scratch:



YO THAT's WHAT I was thinkinnn yoo.
If the rod snaps at the bottom, it would fly horizontally to the right until gravity takes over and forces the tennis ball downwards in a trajectory arc-shaped motion. Is that right?
That's what I wrote down for the test, bruh.



" tiger woods " - doin worrkk, yet again
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A photo of iliketurtles iliketurtles
What tigerwoods said, it goes straight to the right and its horizontal displacement remains constant (assuming we're neglecting air resistance) and its acceleration is straight down because of gravity, so it makes a parabola yay!
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A photo of cyynthiia cyynthiia
^
Is that not what I said about the acceleration being straight down?
Or are you guys discussing what Nyx said?
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A photo of iliketurtles iliketurtles
I thought you meant the ball goes straight down, sorry didn't really read it thoroughly lol
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A photo of cyynthiia cyynthiia
^
Oh, that's what Nyx said haha.
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A photo of Nyx Nyx
Well, then i guess it's a good thing i'm not going into physics, since i was horribly wrong :tongue:
*sigh* oh well.
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A photo of kb4 kb4
man if your going into engineering u better get ur physics down pact
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A photo of kb4 kb4
next year in university engineers take calculus based physics and you will be taken to a whole new level
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A photo of Nyx Nyx
yeah well not going into engineering either...i won't need physics unless i do kines, which i probably won't.
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A photo of DoctorLawyerDentist DoctorLawyerDentist


@Beejeong wrote

@Nyx wrote
I agree with cyynthiia :)
Also, since the rod snaps at the bottom of the circle, the ball doesn't go flying off on a tangent on either the left or the right and falls straight down.



Oh noo.. I f-ed that up on the test..
it's soo obvious now that you say itt.

erryday



It's OK, it gets better. You still have time to make up for it :)



This reminds me of the time Google lured me to a page on yahoo answers.
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