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A photo of StudentAtStPats StudentAtStPats
I heard from a teacher about how physics depends on the development of your brain. Some people have trouble because they just can't understand it. Myth or Fact?
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@StudentAtStPats wrote
I heard from a teacher about how physics depends on the development of your brain. Some people have trouble because they just can't understand it. Myth or Fact?


It's partially true. If your brain is geared towards visualizing applications in the real world, you're more likely to understand physics. If the diagrams/theory doesn't click, you won't get it. What's not true about that statement is that with sufficient practice and by doing experiments, your visualizing skills can improve.

I'll give an example. There is a lesson on relative motion. The student doesn't get why when objects move in opposite directions, the magnitudes of each other's velocity add up. When a car travelling east at 90 km/h collides with a car travelling west at 100 km/h, the impact of the damage would be as if the cars travelled at 190 km/h. Not being able to understand this, the student goes outside and jogs east on the sidewalk. He can notice that cars also travelling east look like they're moving slower than they actually are, because he's moving in the same direction, too. But at the same time, he can notice that the cars travelling west look as if they're going faster than they are, because he's moving in the opposite direction. He also notices that while parked cars are not moving, they are further and further away from him as he jogs away. He may then pick up relative motion more easily.
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partially true. everything is pretty much theory and diagrams. side note being good at math does no mean being good at physics
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A photo of kingsonnest kingsonnest

@bubblepenguin wrote
partially true. everything is pretty much theory and diagrams. side note being good at math does no mean being good at physics



True :) I totally agree. Physics = arithmetic + visual skills. Being good at math does not guarantee that you will be good in physics. Just like math, physics requires LOTS of practice. If you do lots of practice, many of the problems are quite similar.

I used to hate physics but to be honest it is actually FUN. You just have to sit down, think and make sense of it.

It is easy to excel in math without understanding the concepts or the purpose of a derivative of a function. But in physics, you MUST understand the concept in order to be good at it.

That is why I call physics the application of math. Your math skills are useless if you can't apply it to the real world. (Side note: If you can, it is a good idea to always take physics and calculus at the same time)
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