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Problem with choosing double majors..

A photo of kriispsmile kriispsmile
Hi, I'm in grade 12 and I applied to UofT, UTM and York for political science.
I'm having a problem with choosing double majors.
I've already had a post about this but I've been bumping into more problems lately.

I'm fluent in both Korean and English, so I really want to be an interpreter/translator for a corporation. If not, an immigration worker or Foreign Service Officer, which I hear is competitive.
Since immigration worker/FSO is my backup, I decided to take political science.
I'm also interested in Economics; I'm taking it right now and getting mid 80's. I'm pretty strong at math and I think taking Economic in uni would be helpful to go into business(corporations).

Thus, I'm comptemplating between:
-Poli sci & East Asian Studies(to study Korean)
-Poli sci & Economics
-Economics & East Asian Studies


Which would be the best "path" to go into?
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19 replies
 
A photo of Qq Qq
Eco/Poli Sci.

Economics opens more doors
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A photo of Zion Zion
Poli sci and Economics, definitely. If you're already fluent in Korean then don't worry about East Asian Studies. And that doesn't mean you can't still take a few courses in it.

Also, don't you need to be a US citizen to be an FSO?
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A photo of HeroOfCanton HeroOfCanton

@Zion wrote
Poli sci and Economics, definitely. If you're already fluent in Korean then don't worry about East Asian Studies. And that doesn't mean you can't still take a few courses in it.

Also, don't you need to be a US citizen to be an FSO?


Canada has a foreign service too.

From my understanding, East Asian studies is more humanities-based. I'd agree with the people saying econ/poli sci.
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A photo of kriispsmile kriispsmile
Thanks for the replies.

But don't you have to go to graduate school for both poli sci and economics to actually get a job? I would like to get a job right after my BA, although I doubt that's likely..
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A photo of Zion Zion
Poli sci, yes. Econ, not necessarily. If you want options (and $$$) then you'll need to go to grad school. But with a Bachelors you can work pretty much the same jobs as Commerce grads.
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A photo of Qq Qq
I highly doubt you'll get a job with East Asian Studies over Economics or Poli. Sci.
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A photo of kriispsmile kriispsmile
Thanks guys.

Btw, I was wondering, are there such thing as electives in university?
I don't really get how courses work..
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A photo of clairec21 clairec21

@kriispsmile wrote
Thanks for the replies.

But don't you have to go to graduate school for both poli sci and economics to actually get a job? I would like to get a job right after my BA, although I doubt that's likely..


Law school perhaps? Since you want to work with corporations, become a corporate lawyer? Practising law could help you get a position as a foreign service officer. If not, you have law to fall back on :cheers:
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A photo of Zion Zion

@kriispsmile wrote
Thanks guys.

Btw, I was wondering, are there such thing as electives in university?
I don't really get how courses work..


Yes, there are. You have to take a certain amount of required or optional courses to fulfill the credit minimum for your major(s) and any minor(s). Then the credits you have left are spent on general education (first year or two) and any electives that you have the appropriate pre-reqs for. In a word, yes, but with some complications.
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A photo of rishnarale rishnarale
yeah, definately choose polisci and econ. theres a lot more you can do with that and more accessible jobs/money. also, uni does have electives. there are obviously courses u must take for your major. your first year is mostly chosen for you, and sometimes some of the second year, depending on the program. most of the third and fourth year is electives, which allows you to choose a specific topic within your program, or take courses from other programs/faculties.
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A photo of treecows treecows
Just go into first year with an open mind. You don't declare a major until 2nd year. There's probably just one pre-req course for each major. Take courses in all 3 areas and see which ones you enjoy the most and get you the best marks. In the end, your GPA matters more for grad school.
I went into first year thinking I was going to minor with the slight chance of majoring in political science. Now I'm never going to take another polisci course. Most people end up changing their mind in what they're going to study.
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A photo of apack1 apack1
I agree with the last post. Take it easy in first year and get a feel for a variety of subjects... Don't pressure yourself to know what you want to major in until second year until you know more! But I would have to say a poli sci/econ double major looks the most appealing, and would open many more doors!
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A photo of stuiecam123 stuiecam123
Hey just to say something fresh don't view your university time merely as career training...Spend a day asking around "mediocre" jobs and you'll see many people have many degrees out there! Plus we are entering a generation of multiple careers so it's best to also focus on devloping general life skills while at school, as though are becoming a lost "art"
best of luck and enjoy your break!
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A photo of Qq Qq
Your electives are going to go towards your second major
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A photo of scbloom scbloom
You are in Grade 12 and in most university programs you do not have to declare your majors the first or second years. First year courses can be pretty general and you could look at your program of study and what electives you need as well as what pre-requisites you will need for second year courses. Focus on that your first year and that may give you a better idea of what exactly you want to do. Also, it would be very beneficial for you to contact Academic Advising in the faculties you are interested in and go talk to them to discuss your options. There is also a Student Careers services at most universities and they can also set up an appointment to speak to someone there to discuss your options. Good luck
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A photo of deathangel deathangel
Poli Sci + International Relations (Economics included)
or
Poli Sci + Asian Pacific studies (offers more interesting courses than East Asian studies)

I know quite a number of people under those two double majors are thinking of working in the government/embassy/UN/law firm, which(I think) is quite similar to the jobs you wanted in the future.
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A photo of MReiser MReiser
Econ and Poli Sci would be great for opening a lot of doors but in terms of immigration work you might want to look at adding a diploma to your program. Many Universities offer diplomas that you can take on top of your degree (at the same time) that are more specific to things like immigration work. Diplomas like community development, intercultural education, intercultural dispute resolution or other programs like this could really help you out!
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A photo of Ashton Ashton
I agree with the many people that said to not worry about declaring a major in your first year. Most universities don't require this until second year. First year is suppose to introduce you to fields that you may be interested in and give you a sense of where you'd like to be when you finish school.

I completely agree with the person who said that university is suppose to be a time to develope skills and experience that can help you in the real world. There are plenty of ways to make yourself competitive in the job market without focusing on courses. Joining clubs that are related to your career goals can help you network with people that can open the doors you need to get the job you want. We've all heard the solgan "It's not what you know, but who you know." Making the right connections is just as important (and in many case more important) as having the "right" degree.

Also, it's important to know the market for the type of job you want. Don't let anyone tell you what degrees will open what doors. There are many people with philosophy, music, and fine arts degrees practising as lawyers, politicians, diplomats, CEO's, etc. It's the skills that their degree has provided them with that have landed them these positions. Keep your mind open to the possibilities and in the end do what you're passionate about.
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A photo of Alison.Perovich Alison.Perovich
Hey,

If I were you I would do political science and economics, and study Korean and East Asian culture outside of school (in an extra class or just on your own time when you feel like reading about it or looking things up online) but no one can pick what you want to study except you!

Try to think about what you enjoy learning about the most. And if after your first semester you decide you want to switch programs, it's not the end of the world!

Best of luck,

Alison
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