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***QUEENS CON ED ***

A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
So yeah, ask any questions about Queens ConEd Program. Im applying in two years. I was wondering if you can do a study abroad program at queens while in the ConEd program.
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A photo of Ba Ba Blue Ba Ba Blue
Yes you definitely can do a year abroad :). You're only doing education courses 4/5 of the years, so you can take your placement on that one year with no education component. You can also do a placement abroad, but it's best to talk to the practicum office if you want to look into that opportunity.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
wow that is really helpful thank you :)

do you think it is better to do concurrent or do a degree than go back for the one year teacher program?

Also for concurrent at queens, what average do you realistically need to get in? I have TONS of extra curriculars.
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A photo of Ba Ba Blue Ba Ba Blue
If you know for sure you want to be a teacher, con.ed is definitely the way to go. First, you start on your professional journey much earlier so you can start amassing a killer portfolio to get a job. You also end up doing more weeks of placement which better prepares you for your job as a teacher and also gets you better connected with more principals. Yet another advantage is that you join a very fun and supportive community of future educators. The only disadvantage I see is that you end up paying slightly more for school because of the additional courses, but when you're talking about the overall cost of school the $2000 (total, not annually) you spend on extra tuition isn't much.

As for entry average, I've heard mixed things. People with high 80s get accepted and people with 90s get declined. It really does depend on your PSE and education essay. It's really important that you stay focused in those to get to the true point of the admissions program - what have you done that show's you're (1) a well-rounded individual and (2) a good candidate to become a teacher? The quantity doesn't matter nearly as much as the quality from what I gather.

Any other questions just ask and I'll be happy to respond :).
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A photo of megsoleil megsoleil
hey karbear32, I have been accepted to Queen's con-ed. Realistically, I would think you would need to have a 90% or higher, unless you have ridiculously amazing extracurriculars. I was the kind of kid who did just bout every team, committee, or club, on student council, president of the environment club... Just keep good involvement and do well in school, and you should be okay.

As for concurrent vs consecutive, think about what you want from your degree. Generally, concurrent gets you teaching practica starting year 1, so more overall experience. However, I have a friend doing consecutive so she can do her education degree abroad. Both are great choices, although it is nice to have that guaranteed Faculty of Education acceptance provided in concurrent.
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A photo of Ba Ba Blue Ba Ba Blue
All Queen's education students, con.ed or not, can do a placement abroad. You just have to see if you can afford the flight and accommodation. There will be more information on this as you go through your years at Queen's.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
wow thank you guys so much!! this really has helped me. I definetly have a lot to think about!
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A photo of Ba Ba Blue Ba Ba Blue
Yes you definitely do karbear, haha! If you have any questions about Queen's con.ed (or Queen's-Trent, of course) I'll be more than happy to answer what I can. The program structure is nearly identical for the two programs so I know a lot of the details from an education perspective. The only things I don't know are Queen's-specific, especially degree requirements for your B.Sc or B.A.

Another thing to consider when browsing through different con.ed programs is that not all programs start their placements in year 1 as Megsoleil mentioned. A good example of this is Brock's con.ed program that doesn't start their placement until much later. Look into that when you're shopping around for schools because I found that I learned much more on my short 10-day placement in first year than I did in 2 entire semesters of education theory classes.
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A photo of mallaroid mallaroid
I'm hoping for Queen's Con-Ed with a bachelor in Arts :)
What's the average and prerequisites? Anybody?
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A photo of samwise575 samwise575

@mallaroid wrote
I'm hoping for Queen's Con-Ed with a bachelor in Arts :)
What's the average and prerequisites? Anybody?



The average cutoff is a 87. After that it doesn't matter how high your average is, it's all based on the PSE and I'm pretty sure con ed has another essay you have to write.
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A photo of karenlam1 karenlam1
im definateli gona go for concurrent, & queens looks lke the best uni for it so far (:
i understand the cut off is 87%, and i know wit my advanced functions mark this coming gr.12 year will pull it down fo sure
& i saw the admission requirements is just english & 2 U courses.
shud i drop the math & just take data so i'll have a higher average?
im also involved in school clubs & did children summer camp every summer since gr.8 & swimming instructor for a year.
if i end wit a high 80s average is it realistic to get in?
thankssssssss
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A photo of Ba Ba Blue Ba Ba Blue
Hey karenlam,

Being real, high 80s is not very competitive for the arts stream, but if you're going for science then you MAY be competitive. For Queen's, getting above a 90 average is somewhat important - I don't know very many people who got in without it, and most of the people I do know who had that were waitlisted. Of course this could be a distorted perspective of reality, so take my experience for what it is.

If Queen's con.ed is a program that really appeals to you, then consider also applying for the Queen's-Trent con.ed program. Essentially it's the EXACT same program with a slightly lower entry average (mid-80's is competitive with a good PSE). The difference is merely where you end up doing the first 4 years of the program. Trent is a smaller school than Queen's, but there are certain benefits to that as well (i.e. con.ed students take many of the same classes, and there are proportionately more con.ed students in Trent so you'll be in class with other con.ed students).

Of course there are other options that don't need a 90 average throughout Ontario as well that are all definitely viable options. Consider Brock, Nipissing, York and Windsor who all have concurrent programs.
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A photo of leahcarson1 leahcarson1
I am currently a grade 11 student, that is very interested in the Queen's Con Ed program. However, I am a little confused as to how they look at your average.. Do I send in an average with my PSE? If so, is it only based on your grade 12 - first semester marks or are your grade eleven marks taken into consideration?
Thank you, Leah :)
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A photo of Ba Ba Blue Ba Ba Blue
If you go to high school in Ontario then your guidance department will send in your marks. There will be questions for you to answer on your PSE - you don't have to worry about formulating any sort of response right now.

As for your grade 11 marks, they are used if and only if Queen's wants to consider you for early admission. Otherwise, it's all riding on grade 12 courses.
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A photo of Fawlkes Fawlkes
Hey Leah

I'm in Queen's Con-Ed right now and I thought I could give a little more detail on how Queen's looks at your average. Baba is absolutly right about how Queen's will get your marks. As far as how Queen's looks at your grade 11 marks, the simple answer is, they don't. Queen's has several highly competitive programs, including Con-Ed, for which the academic component of addmissions considerations is based on, generally, grade 12 marks only. The exception to this are major entrance award winners, who are generally accpeted much earlier and potentially on the basis of grade 11 marks. Once the first set of gr. 12 marks come in, some admissions may go out, supported by consistancy in the gr. 11 marks, but Queen's will often wait until receiving the second round of mark updates (usually around early April) to really start rolling out batches of acceptances.

The other exciting thing is that our program is growing! Queen's is increasing the number of first year spots. At the moment, no one is really sure how this will effect the admissions average. My year is the largest class they have had so far, and also had the highest admissions average, but it could easily go the other way. No matter what, we are all very excited to spread more Con-Ed love. Work hard, be involved in your school and community, and strive to be the best you can be. That's all Queen's can ask of you, and all you can expect of yourself. Good luck!
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A photo of Ba Ba Blue Ba Ba Blue
What you say makes me mad Fawlkes. We should be making less spots, not more. This is considering how many unemployed teachers are in Ontario at the present moment.
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A photo of Fawlkes Fawlkes
I agree, which is why, thankfully, Queen's isn't upping the number of graduates from the faculty of education. For every spot they create in Con-Ed, a spot will be taken out of the consecutive program. The logic is that a greater percentage of people applying to Con-Ed truely WANT to become teachers, as opposed to the many people who apply to teachers college as a fall back after completeing an undergraduate degree. So they aren't upping the number of teachers, but they are trying to up the number of passionate and critically reflective teachers. :)
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A photo of Ba Ba Blue Ba Ba Blue
Now that you word it like that, I think I'd already heard about the change. I like it. I personally think that the majority of spots at every institution should be con.ed spots as opposed to consecutive, if for no other reasons than the ones you've mentioned above.
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A photo of Cr?meGlac Cr?meGlac

@Fawlkes wrote
I agree, which is why, thankfully, Queen's isn't upping the number of graduates from the faculty of education. For every spot they create in Con-Ed, a spot will be taken out of the consecutive program. The logic is that a greater percentage of people applying to Con-Ed truely WANT to become teachers, as opposed to the many people who apply to teachers college as a fall back after completeing an undergraduate degree. So they aren't upping the number of teachers, but they are trying to up the number of passionate and critically reflective teachers. :)


I think that's a good idea. :)


I have quite a few questions. Firstly, how big are the classes at Queens? I guess it might average from class to class, but I'm just wondering. And how are the profs?
Also, is it true that Queen's is a party school? My mom told me that and now she does not want me going there, haha.
And is there anywhere I can find out more about the clubs at Queens? Aside from the list in the viewbook? I'm just curious.
My other questions are PSE related. Do awards earned in elementary school within the past 4 years count? Also, I know I asked this before, but what's the difference between volunteering and unpaid employment?
If I tutor for an organization and I do private tutoring as well, should I write those as two separate things?

(Sorry for all the questions. I'm freaking out right now after bombing my Mac Artsci application. If I don't get into Con. Ed, I guess I'm taking a gap year... )
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A photo of Ba Ba Blue Ba Ba Blue
I'll let someone else answer the question about class size, but it's pretty typical for the size of the university.

As for party school, the answer is yes. Queen's definitely parties hard. What you can tell your mom is that there will be parties wherever you go (a university without keggers every weekend is non-existent). What you can tell her is that you have the will-power to resist the urge to attend these and will still take your studies very seriously. The fact that Queen's is known to be a party school only matters if you go to the parties and make poor decisions.

To learn more about the clubs at Queen's, go to http://myams.org/. That's the Queen's student government website. There is a tab for clubs that you can look under to see what you would be interested in.

Past 4 years indicates they want something more recent. Putting them would show that you haven't done enough recently. Instead, try highlighting more recent awards and activities. As for the volunteer vs. unpaid employment, volunteer indicates that it was a repeated commitment that they would've been sad if they didn't see you (i.e. going EVERY WEEK to a hospital to volunteer - committed long-term), whereas a "volunteer" experience could be a one-off event you helped with, or a committee that you were a part of. Really, it's all open to how you interpret your experiences.

As for the 2 tutoring jobs, I would just use 1. Queen's likes to see diversity in your experiences.
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A photo of Cr?meGlac Cr?meGlac

@Ba Ba Blue wrote
I'll let someone else answer the question about class size, but it's pretty typical for the size of the university.

As for party school, the answer is yes. Queen's definitely parties hard. What you can tell your mom is that there will be parties wherever you go (a university without keggers every weekend is non-existent). What you can tell her is that you have the will-power to resist the urge to attend these and will still take your studies very seriously. The fact that Queen's is known to be a party school only matters if you go to the parties and make poor decisions.

To learn more about the clubs at Queen's, go to http://myams.org/. That's the Queen's student government website. There is a tab for clubs that you can look under to see what you would be interested in.

Past 4 years indicates they want something more recent. Putting them would show that you haven't done enough recently. Instead, try highlighting more recent awards and activities. As for the volunteer vs. unpaid employment, volunteer indicates that it was a repeated commitment that they would've been sad if they didn't see you (i.e. going EVERY WEEK to a hospital to volunteer - committed long-term), whereas a "volunteer" experience could be a one-off event you helped with, or a committee that you were a part of. Really, it's all open to how you interpret your experiences.

As for the 2 tutoring jobs, I would just use 1. Queen's likes to see diversity in your experiences.



Alright, thanks for your help! I'm still confused about volunteer vs. unpaid employment though. Do you mean that unpaid employment= repeated commitment, and volunteer= one time experience... or the other way around? I was thinking that Queens would prefer long term activities to one-time experiences?

Oh and I think I'm going to have trouble choosing which clubs to join (if I get accepted into Queens!) Wow, there's so many! Out of curiosity, are there any music/piano clubs that are open for non music students?
The only thing is, I haven't really won many recent awards- so that awards section is going to be pretty empty, there's 5 spaces.

One more question (sorry I have so many)... kind of random, but one of extracurriculars is web design. I have a website about the environment/eco friendly living. Would they want me to put the URL too? I feel kind of weird about doing that, I don't know if its a good EC but I do spend a lot of time on it.

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A photo of Fawlkes Fawlkes
Hey, just wanted to add a bit more to the answers Babablue gave you. :)

First of all, while class sizes vary greatly (my largest has 400 students in one lecture, and my smallest, 80) one of the many great things about Queen's is that there is a lab or tutorial component to almost every single first year course, with a maximum of 25 students in it, meaning lots of contact with TAs and chances for in depth discusions in small group settings. In fact on of my tutorials has only 10 people in it. As for the profs, generally they are pretty good, but as I'm sure you've found with teachers in high school, some are fantastic, others... not so much... That's one thing that really doesn't change once you get to university.

As for Queen's being a party school, it's not nearly as severe as many media outlets (and sometimes Queen's students themselves) would have you believe. Parties happen at every university, including Queen's. But there are also many people at Queen's who choose not to party. I've never been a fan of binge drinking, and the "party culture" at Queen's has never been an issue for me. Also, Con-Ed is a really safe and friendly environment. We're more of a family than a faculty. We tend to laugh when there are big functions like a dance, because most college parties conjure images of well... dirty dancing to say the least. But at Con-Ed jams WE LINE DANCE TO ABBA. We're big on personal space, conga lines, YMCA and the backstreet boy imitations. Con-Ed is probably the most G-rated environment on campus. :)

As for awards, you could also include things for which you were selected to participate, such as representing your school at a conference, achievement levels in a sport or activity such as piano levels or earning a bronze cross in swimming, promotions you were given at work, etc.

And yes, Queen's has MANY clubs. Unfortunatly, not all of them are as active as one might hope. So sign up for whatever appeals to you and you'll soon figure out which are worth your time and effort, and will give you the most enjoyment.

As for the unpaid employment vs. volunteer thing, I got in contact with the Con-Ed office about that one, and aparently unpaid employment is when you are assigned a time and place where you must show up because you made a commitment. Volunteer work is when you are not assigned but choose to show up at a time of your own choosing, even if it is the same time every week. So teaching kids to swim from 3-5 every monday would be unpaid employment, but dropping in to your local food bank, unassigned to volunteer every week at the same time would be volunteer work. However, if you have had 5 or more paying jobs, you may list unpaid employment as volunteer work.

And finally, no, you don't need to put the URL, and it is obviously something you are passionate about and it demonstrates a diverse skill set, so I think it would be a great thing to include! And remember, you have to put an estimate of the time you spend on it, so that alone will show how much you care about it and put into it.

Best of luck!
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A photo of Cr?meGlac Cr?meGlac

@Fawlkes wrote
Hey, just wanted to add a bit more to the answers Babablue gave you. :)

First of all, while class sizes vary greatly (my largest has 400 students in one lecture, and my smallest, 80) one of the many great things about Queen's is that there is a lab or tutorial component to almost every single first year course, with a maximum of 25 students in it, meaning lots of contact with TAs and chances for in depth discusions in small group settings. In fact on of my tutorials has only 10 people in it. As for the profs, generally they are pretty good, but as I'm sure you've found with teachers in high school, some are fantastic, others... not so much... That's one thing that really doesn't change once you get to university.

As for Queen's being a party school, it's not nearly as severe as many media outlets (and sometimes Queen's students themselves) would have you believe. Parties happen at every university, including Queen's. But there are also many people at Queen's who choose not to party. I've never been a fan of binge drinking, and the "party culture" at Queen's has never been an issue for me. Also, Con-Ed is a really safe and friendly environment. We're more of a family than a faculty. We tend to laugh when there are big functions like a dance, because most college parties conjure images of well... dirty dancing to say the least. But at Con-Ed jams WE LINE DANCE TO ABBA. We're big on personal space, conga lines, YMCA and the backstreet boy imitations. Con-Ed is probably the most G-rated environment on campus. :)

As for awards, you could also include things for which you were selected to participate, such as representing your school at a conference, achievement levels in a sport or activity such as piano levels or earning a bronze cross in swimming, promotions you were given at work, etc.

And yes, Queen's has MANY clubs. Unfortunatly, not all of them are as active as one might hope. So sign up for whatever appeals to you and you'll soon figure out which are worth your time and effort, and will give you the most enjoyment.

As for the unpaid employment vs. volunteer thing, I got in contact with the Con-Ed office about that one, and aparently unpaid employment is when you are assigned a time and place where you must show up because you made a commitment. Volunteer work is when you are not assigned but choose to show up at a time of your own choosing, even if it is the same time every week. So teaching kids to swim from 3-5 every monday would be unpaid employment, but dropping in to your local food bank, unassigned to volunteer every week at the same time would be volunteer work. However, if you have had 5 or more paying jobs, you may list unpaid employment as volunteer work.

And finally, no, you don't need to put the URL, and it is obviously something you are passionate about and it demonstrates a diverse skill set, so I think it would be a great thing to include! And remember, you have to put an estimate of the time you spend on it, so that alone will show how much you care about it and put into it.

Best of luck!



Thanks for explaining everything, your explanation about unpaid employment vs volunteering makes so much sense! And now I can fill up my awards section, =D
But I still think I might have to put something like "Honour Roll"
Would that look bad? Because I've been getting the honour roll since grade 9 but I only have space to put one of the years down.

After reading your post I'm even more excited about Queen's :) and less worried about my PSE now (and the partying).
For my ECs, would it make sense to put playing piano/piano lessons/ performing at senior homes/ duets all under one category? They're all kind of related and I'd have trouble estimating the time I spend if I write it down separately. I mean I practise for piano lessons and my performances at the same time...

And wow I just thought of another question... maybe I'm otherthinking.
But if I plan on doing an activity every week for less than I year, what do I put for # of weeks per year? Do I put 52/52 to show that I'm doing it every week, or just write down the actual number of weeks I plan to do the activity?
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A photo of Fawlkes Fawlkes
It makes perfect sense to put all those piano related things into one item.

Also, you only need to put the numer of weeks you plan to do the activity. Remember, the number of characters you can use is limited, so it is best to conserve them while you can. If you are doing it every week for a full year, just put 52. If you are doing it for the school year, put 38 or whatever it works out to. They'll pretty much figure out from that that there is an off season, but that otherwise, you do it every week.
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A photo of Cr?meGlac Cr?meGlac
Thanks again for your help!

For the PSE, do you think having done the activity for a longer period of time would be valued over what the actual activity is?
I started a few great ECs this year/ last year, but I'm worried that it won't be valued as much because I haven't been doing it for a long time. On the other hand, I felt that the experiences were valuable and would be nice to talk about in my essays. So I'm kind of conflicted. I wish we had more than 5 spaces!

Another thing, what if I've been doing an activity for 3 years, but during the first year, I only did it once every 2 months and then started doing it every week... or something like that? I don't want to over/underestimate my hours

Also, I don't have many "official" community service hours. After I hit 40, I kind of stopped bothering with the forms... Will Queen's look at that?

And does anyone know last year's entrance average for Con Ed, both arts and science?
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A photo of Fawlkes Fawlkes
For the PSE all activities are considered equally, for the sub ap, ones that you can relate to teaching or kids are preferable. My advice is to pick the ones you are most passionate about as they will inspire the best writing.

Just try to estimate hours as closely as possible. You'll know if you are being honest with yourself.

No, Queen's won't check your official community hours. They do however call one of every 10 referees to confirm truth in the statements.

And finally, this year's entrance average for Con Ed Arts and Science combined was 93. The entrance average for the class of 2015 across all faculties was 88.
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