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Queen's vs. UWO vs. U of T vs. Laurier

A photo of Quickstrike Quickstrike
Which of these is best for Arts + has a good social life?
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A photo of heesoup heesoup
Western all the way!
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A photo of jessie191 jessie191
Queen's!
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A photo of PeoplesChamp PeoplesChamp
Queen's bud. The school reputation speaks for itself and you can take a look at their acceptance rate versus people rejected. Not that this means much, but it does say something that there are a lot of people interested in the university and apply, yet only 37% approximately of applicants actually get in. Also it's important to note the combined entering final average of entering first year Queen's students is 87.7% one of the highest in the country and the students at Queen's are some of the brightest in the bunch. All in all, choose whatever floats your boat, just laying down the facts for yah.

Cheers.
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A photo of Doorhandle Doorhandle
Honestly, for Arts, I dont think it matters. Go visit the schools, see which one fits you the best, and go there.
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A photo of poeticallydemented poeticallydemented
U of T gives you a lot of flexibility in your degree. You can choose from half year courses to full year and not really be restricted (within reason) with what you take.They obviously won't let an English Literature student take an immunology course, but that's wherever you go. The social life is not that hoppin', unfortunately. A lot of people who just want to go, study, and graduate. It can be a cold place if you don't get involved. That being said, Toronto has way more opportunities to do things off campus with your friends and the city is beautiful.

UWO can kind of get a bit of a reputation. I've heard the school itself is fantastic and the profs are great, but they make you take five year long courses in your first year which is a bit restrictive if you're looking for some variety. The social life there is awesome, a lot of parties, etc. However, the degree may not hold as much prestige as you would think - when I was looking at Western, my parents (who both have had to hire university graduates in their professions) warned me about the stigma that employers have against Western: they're more likely to think you partied your way through your undergrad.

Queen's is an excellent school. Kingston can be a bit dank if you're from a big city like I am. I've heard great things, everyone I know who goes there loves it and has 0 complaints!

Laurier doesn't hold the kind of prestige and academic excellence the other three hold. Unless you live in Waterloo and can't afford to go away, I'd pick one of the others. Besides, they're a huge party school as well.
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A photo of Emaad13 Emaad13

@Doorhandle wrote
Honestly, for Arts, I dont think it matters. Go visit the schools, see which one fits you the best, and go there.



+11111
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A photo of heesoup heesoup

@poeticallydemented wrote
U of T gives you a lot of flexibility in your degree. You can choose from half year courses to full year and not really be restricted (within reason) with what you take.They obviously won't let an English Literature student take an immunology course, but that's wherever you go. The social life is not that hoppin', unfortunately. A lot of people who just want to go, study, and graduate. It can be a cold place if you don't get involved. That being said, Toronto has way more opportunities to do things off campus with your friends and the city is beautiful.

UWO can kind of get a bit of a reputation. I've heard the school itself is fantastic and the profs are great, but they make you take five year long courses in your first year which is a bit restrictive if you're looking for some variety. The social life there is awesome, a lot of parties, etc. However, the degree may not hold as much prestige as you would think - when I was looking at Western, my parents (who both have had to hire university graduates in their professions) warned me about the stigma that employers have against Western: they're more likely to think you partied your way through your undergrad.
.




For Western, you don't have to take 5 "year-long" courses. You just need 5 credits. You can take a variety of half-courses...And it does not matter if you "partied your way through your undergrad" if you have the marks.
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A photo of Zion Zion

@poeticallydemented wrote
Queen's is an excellent school. Kingston can be a bit dank if you're from a big city like I am. I've heard great things, everyone I know who goes there loves it and has 0 complaints!


This is what turned me on to Queen's too. Doesn't seem like you can go wrong.
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A photo of poeticallydemented poeticallydemented

@heesoup wrote


For Western, you don't have to take 5 "year-long" courses. You just need 5 credits. You can take a variety of half-courses...And it does not matter if you "partied your way through your undergrad" if you have the marks.



When I went to their open house, one of the people who did academic counselling told me that the majority of their courses were year long courses and they offered 'a few' half credit courses. I could be wrong, I haven't actually looked at the course calendar since I've decided not to go there.

Granted, someone who manages to pull off good marks usually won't have a hard time finding a job. However, you do have to recognize the reputation that goes along with the school. It may not necessarily be accurate but its there.
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A photo of heesoup heesoup

@poeticallydemented wrote

@heesoup wrote


For Western, you don't have to take 5 "year-long" courses. You just need 5 credits. You can take a variety of half-courses...And it does not matter if you "partied your way through your undergrad" if you have the marks.



When I went to their open house, one of the people who did academic counselling told me that the majority of their courses were year long courses and they offered 'a few' half credit courses. I could be wrong, I haven't actually looked at the course calendar since I've decided not to go there.

Granted, someone who manages to pull off good marks usually won't have a hard time finding a job. However, you do have to recognize the reputation that goes along with the school. It may not necessarily be accurate but its there.



I really doubt that rep matters too much...
And the course book is very detailed and there are actually quite a lot of half courses.
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A photo of jessie191 jessie191

@heesoup wrote

@poeticallydemented wrote

@heesoup wrote


For Western, you don't have to take 5 "year-long" courses. You just need 5 credits. You can take a variety of half-courses...And it does not matter if you "partied your way through your undergrad" if you have the marks.



When I went to their open house, one of the people who did academic counselling told me that the majority of their courses were year long courses and they offered 'a few' half credit courses. I could be wrong, I haven't actually looked at the course calendar since I've decided not to go there.

Granted, someone who manages to pull off good marks usually won't have a hard time finding a job. However, you do have to recognize the reputation that goes along with the school. It may not necessarily be accurate but its there.



I really doubt that rep matters too much...
And the course book is very detailed and there are actually quite a lot of half courses.


I don't think employers would discriminate against a school for having a partying rep, I mean it's not a bad thing. I'm sure they're more open minded than that.
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A photo of poeticallydemented poeticallydemented

@jessie191 wrote

@heesoup wrote


I really doubt that rep matters too much...
And the course book is very detailed and there are actually quite a lot of half courses.


I don't think employers would discriminate against a school for having a partying rep, I mean it's not a bad thing. I'm sure they're more open minded than that.



One can only hope...
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A photo of emotycka emotycka
[quote=Emaad13]
@Doorhandle wrote
Honestly, for Arts, I dont think it matters. Go visit the schools, see which one fits you the best, and go there.



So true. Go where you feel most comfortable.
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A photo of RichardS RichardS
What criteria are you using for finding the "best fit".

I'm trying to decide between Laurier and Western. I'm looking at course availability and internships for the academic side. I'm also considering the campus facilities, grad school readiness, school location and campus activities. Anything else?
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A photo of bladerunner905 bladerunner905
Anything that's not UofT is a scrub school.

Just saiyan.
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A photo of m27xx m27xx
UofT - it has the most programs and courses to choose from in the arts & science department than any other school, and its reputation is among the best. socially, its a big school with lots of people, lots of clubs, lots of sports and opportunities to get involved. plus its in toronto - there's always something to do (which you may not experience in Kingston or Waterloo). hope that helps a bit! :)
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