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Question about BBA/BComm

A photo of prodarkhunter prodarkhunter
Hey guys, I have a question due to confusion.
If I take BBA program in say Laurier, or Commerce program in queen's, where could I work when I graduate?
Say I take BBA, and I specialize in finance or accounting, I don't neccesarily have to be a manager, I could work as an accountant or some finance related jobs?
So basically after graduating a BBA/BComm program where do I stand as a person? What are the career paths I can take?
I am just generally very confused because there really is no information of what you are after you graduate one of these programs.
Would appreciate if someone could explain me these things.
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A photo of g93 g93
It may sound cliche, but the possibilities are endless. There are people who graduate from a business program and don't work in business. In business, there's accounting, finance, marketing, HR, operations and supply chain management, consulting, and more (and all of the areas in between). Within each of those broad areas is a ton of other areas. As an accountant, you could work at an accounting firm preparing taxes for small businesses, you could work as an accounting manager at a manufacturer where you report to upper management all of the firm's financial results, you could work as a forensic accountant assisting law authorities with large fraud cases, or you could work at a large accounting firm auditing the financial statements of some of the biggest companies you know. There's tons of things you could be doing, and it doesn't just have to be doing accounting.

When you graduate your BBA/BComm program, you will start from the ground-up almost, or you could start higher up if you have had co-op/internships. For example, if you worked at KPMG as an auditor you could be a Senior Staff Accountant by the time you graduate Laurier (with co-op). You're not at the bottom, but you're far from the top.

Does that help? I suggest that you do some more research.
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A photo of prodarkhunter prodarkhunter
Thanks for the reply.
The thing that I am most confused about is, if I go to business administration/ commerce, Do I necessarily need to be a manager? As in, could I work in the same position as an accountant per say if I were to take a dedicated accounting program in say Brock university?
My dad keeps telling me that if I finish BBA / Commerce I am going to be "nobody". As in it is a very big subject and I am going to know a lot about business but not going to be specialized in any of the fields, making me useful only as a manager, and nobody would take me as an accountant or any job for that matter of fact.
Is that true?
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A photo of g93 g93

@prodarkhunter wrote
Thanks for the reply.
The thing that I am most confused about is, if I go to business administration/ commerce, Do I necessarily need to be a manager? As in, could I work in the same position as an accountant per say if I were to take a dedicated accounting program in say Brock university?
My dad keeps telling me that if I finish BBA / Commerce I am going to be "nobody". As in it is a very big subject and I am going to know a lot about business but not going to be specialized in any of the fields, making me useful only as a manager, and nobody would take me as an accountant or any job for that matter of fact.
Is that true?


Not true. If you specialize in accounting at Laurier BBA or Queen's BComm or any other program you are no different than someone in Brock BAcc or Waterloo AFM (although stuff such as reputation and the fact that Waterloo and Brock have co-op during tax season and all that fun stuff does apply).

At a dedicated accounting program, you learn a lot about accounting. In first year at Waterloo, we have two accounting courses, whereas you might not have your first until second year at a business program. While there is a greater focus on accounting, essentially you learn the same thing. In a business program, you will learn marketing, HR, operations, etc (you do get some of this stuff at Waterloo and Brock btw) and then start taking less of that stuff and more accounting as you specialize. Most programs have the courses available for you to complete your CA designation, so in the end you get there, with only slight variations.

The difference? In a full business program, you have the option to study anything business-related. In an accounting program, you are directed more at accounting, and are taking the most direct route to get there. Although you could get to other business areas in a roundabout way, accounting programs limit your options to mostly accounting and in the case of Waterloo finance as well. Business programs don't have that limit, but might not be quite as direct.

So, in short, going to a BBA/BComm program you can indeed specialize. You can very easily come out of, say, Laurier BBA and work at, say, Meyers Norris Penny, and work alongside, say, a recent Brock BAcc grad.
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A photo of prodarkhunter prodarkhunter
Thanks for the info.
But if I specialize in say finance, I will still get bachelors of business administration, but will I get another bachelor stating I specialized in finance?
My dad has hard time believing me that I can work as an accountant or even as a financial analyst or anything similar to that if I graduate with BBA / Commerce. All he thinks is that BBA / Commerce is a program that teaches me everything about business and when I graduate I don't know something specific and I am left to be no one. Is there a website/ place where I can show him and prove him wrong because he is giving me hard time nowadays saying he doesn't want me to go study BBA and makes me find other career paths I am not even interested in.
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A photo of g93 g93

@prodarkhunter wrote
Thanks for the info.
But if I specialize in say finance, I will still get bachelors of business administration, but will I get another bachelor stating I specialized in finance?
My dad has hard time believing me that I can work as an accountant or even as a financial analyst or anything similar to that if I graduate with BBA / Commerce. All he thinks is that BBA / Commerce is a program that teaches me everything about business and when I graduate I don't know something specific and I am left to be no one. Is there a website/ place where I can show him and prove him wrong because he is giving me hard time nowadays saying he doesn't want me to go study BBA and makes me find other career paths I am not even interested in.


Depending on the university, you will get a Bachelors of Business Administration (or a BComm) with likely a specialization in finance and some I think will just say BBA or BComm.

You will be showing employers your transcript when you apply for jobs. When they see all of the finance courses that you took, they will know that you are educated on finance.

Business programs start general and then you can eventually narrow your focus. There is an opportunity to stay very broad if you don't know what to do, but you can also be very focused.

Each university website will mention the different specializations/areas of study for their business programs. You can look up all of the courses in a particular discipline that you can take. You could also take a look at the different co-op jobs that students get. I also suggest that you look up the program brochures and/or annual reports. This is the area that the university will rave about their program. They will talk about what you can specialize in and what they can provide you with that will set you apart. It will also mention co-op if that is applicable and also possibly jobs post-graduation (and earnings).
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A photo of rightsaidfred rightsaidfred
Nothing.
There isn't much you can do with a Bachelors degree in business or commerce or finance.

It just provides a good baseline for master or PHD... in a similar sense, you cannot really do anything with a bachelor in math or physics either. You need a master/PHD to get a job or recognized.

I'm not sure WHAT you can get with a degree in business beyond jobs that every day people get.

If you want a job in mathematical finance like quantitative analysis or statistics, well, they don't want "commerce" or "finance" on your degree - they don't even want an "actuarial science" degree. Check the google search results - they want Math PHD's and Physics PHD's.

So honestly, I don't know the jobs you can get. I doubt you could get anything substantial with JUST a bachelor of commerce.
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A photo of rightsaidfred rightsaidfred
To suceed in the math, physics, chemistry field, you essentially need to get a master/PHD.
Every professor I've talked to about this has told me this. ANd it's so difficult to get a job that they don't recommend it.

THey said the same thing for business majors. I'm just repeating what I said. Just because your teacher tells you you can get a job if you go to university doesn't mean it's true.
There are lots of people who go get arts and business degrees. They end up as part of the OWS movement crying that they're in debt studying a degree that has no jobs.
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A photo of Nick0rz Nick0rz

@rightsaidfred wrote
To suceed in the math, physics, chemistry field, you essentially need to get a master/PHD.
Every professor I've talked to about this has told me this. ANd it's so difficult to get a job that they don't recommend it.

THey said the same thing for business majors. I'm just repeating what I said. Just because your teacher tells you you can get a job if you go to university doesn't mean it's true.
There are lots of people who go get arts and business degrees. They end up as part of the OWS movement crying that they're in debt studying a degree that has no jobs.


A wild counter example appears!

97.6% of Laurier BBA grads have jobs after 6 months. http://www.wlu.ca/page.php?grp_id=169&p=2671

70% of OWS'ers have jobs. (More then Tea Partiers) http://dailyinfographic.com/face-off-occupy-wall-street-vs-tea-party-infographic

To succeed in RESEARCH in math, physics, chemistry etc you need a PHd. To get a solid job. You need an undergrad.


EDIT: The OWS movement is about the wealth disparity between the richest and poorest. It's a legitimate problem, because the richest people are able to influence the government in order to make beneficial decisions. In the US there are NO limitations on the amount someone can donate to a political campaign, thus allowing the richest people to set up "awareness" organizations which run ads battering political candidates who have a viewpoint differing from there own. Here's an excellent article detailing one example of this: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/10/10/111010fa_fact_mayer

The OWS movement is NOT people whining about how theyre in debt, its about how the rich are getting richer because their rich, and the poor are getting poorer because the rich want to get richer. In a democratic society Congress should listen to the majority, NOT the majority of the wealth.

Note: I support the point of the OWS movement, theyve been able to generate a lot of discussion, but its time for the movement to begin bringing ideas forward, or to continue the discussion without disrupting the lives of everyone else.
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A photo of rightsaidfred rightsaidfred
A single counterexample doesn't disaprove anything. That's called an outlier.
Also LOL: "Chief Risk Officer".
That's like saying "Yes you should go to university and major in theatre: that way, you can become an actor and be as rich as Angelina Jolie because ALL actors become hollywood millionaires!"
Just wow.

Being employed in 6 months has nothing to do with what I said. That could mean employment at McDonald's or Burger King which definitely doesn't require a business degree. That's what most universities leave out. You're naive if you believe otherwise.

That's right. To do research, you need a PHD. Name some companies that'll hire math and physics bachelors for things relevant to their degrees.


The OWS movement is NOT people whining about how theyre in debt, its about how the rich are getting richer because their rich, and the poor are getting poorer because the rich want to get richer. In a democratic society Congress should listen to the majority, NOT the majority of the wealth.



One, I know what it's about, but I don't care. Why did you tell me?
Two, what should happen and what does happen are two very different things. Crying about it isn't going to do anything.

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A photo of g93 g93
Combined the Big 5/6 accounting firms in Canada hire well over 1000 people, many of these from a business undergrad.

1000+ students successfully write the UFE each year, the majority of them do not have anything past an undergrad. The vast majority of them are already hired or will be hired shortly.

Are these outliers too?
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A photo of rightsaidfred rightsaidfred

@g93 wrote
Combined the Big 5/6 accounting firms in Canada hire well over 1000 people, many of these from a business undergrad.

1000+ students successfully write the UFE each year, the majority of them do not have anything past an undergrad. The vast majority of them are already hired or will be hired shortly.

Are these outliers too?



They're worse than outliers. It's heresay until I see some sources.
And even if they are hired - enjoy working for $15 an hour 9-5 for the rest of your life, Mr. Business Major.
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A photo of g93 g93

@rightsaidfred wrote

@g93 wrote
Combined the Big 5/6 accounting firms in Canada hire well over 1000 people, many of these from a business undergrad.

1000+ students successfully write the UFE each year, the majority of them do not have anything past an undergrad. The vast majority of them are already hired or will be hired shortly.

Are these outliers too?



They're worse than outliers. It's heresay until I see some sources.
And even if they are hired - enjoy working for $15 an hour 9-5 for the rest of your life, Mr. Business Major.


Perhaps you should be taking a look at the CA Salary Report (and the CMA and CGA ones while you're at it). The average salary for first-year CAs was $70,400 iirc in 2010. The number rises steeply from there.

Much of this information can be found online.

And I'm not a business major.
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A photo of mxfire mxfire

@rightsaidfred wrote
Nothing.
There isn't much you can do with a Bachelors degree in business or commerce or finance.

It just provides a good baseline for master or PHD... in a similar sense, you cannot really do anything with a bachelor in math or physics either. You need a master/PHD to get a job or recognized.

I'm not sure WHAT you can get with a degree in business beyond jobs that every day people get.

If you want a job in mathematical finance like quantitative analysis or statistics, well, they don't want "commerce" or "finance" on your degree - they don't even want an "actuarial science" degree. Check the google search results - they want Math PHD's and Physics PHD's.

So honestly, I don't know the jobs you can get. I doubt you could get anything substantial with JUST a bachelor of commerce.



Really?

Now mind you, that's only for one business school. I seriously can't tell if you're trolling or are just plain ignorant.
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A photo of Nick0rz Nick0rz

@rightsaidfred wrote

@g93 wrote
Combined the Big 5/6 accounting firms in Canada hire well over 1000 people, many of these from a business undergrad.

1000+ students successfully write the UFE each year, the majority of them do not have anything past an undergrad. The vast majority of them are already hired or will be hired shortly.

Are these outliers too?



They're worse than outliers. It's heresay until I see some sources.


No, the weight is on you to support your claim. You can't go X IS TRUE, PROVE THAT IT ISNT. Go X is true, here's the proof. Back up what youre saying, with something other then anecdotal evidence from people that you may of talked to. You say that profs have told you this, but you haven't told us the exact questions you asked them, and their exact response. That leaves far to much ambiguity in your claim.

Beyond that, people have showed you examples of people who have made it up the ranks with just an undergrad. You've been shown employment rates, and now employment placement statistics. Its on you to support your claim with actual facts now.
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A photo of Gymmonkey Gymmonkey

@rightsaidfred wrote

@g93 wrote
Combined the Big 5/6 accounting firms in Canada hire well over 1000 people, many of these from a business undergrad.

1000+ students successfully write the UFE each year, the majority of them do not have anything past an undergrad. The vast majority of them are already hired or will be hired shortly.

Are these outliers too?



They're worse than outliers. It's heresay until I see some sources.
And even if they are hired - enjoy working for $15 an hour 9-5 for the rest of your life, Mr. Business Major.



You have to hand it to this guy, he is pretty funny. Obviously the kid is in a joke program and is jealous of the business majors at his school.

I have my first co op term this summer and looking pretty far down at $15/hr. Oh ya, and this figure goes up in every co op term I participate in. Oh ya, 60% of students continue to find employment after graduation from a previous co op placement; 37& of others find it elsewhere in a related field.

It really is too bad that you hate your job at McDonalds.
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