yconic - Ryerson or Waterloo?
Hide Menu

My Feed Money for School Student Help Brands Winners Support Center



Explore yconic
Explore Student Life Topics
Scotiabank
STUDENT CHAMPION
yconic proudly recognizes Student Champion Partners who are providing our community with superior support for their student journeys. Learn More
Student Help Brands

Ryerson or Waterloo?

A photo of SShah SShah
I have gotten accepted at Ryerson for computer engineering and got an alternate offer from Waterloo for computer science (regular). If I go to Ryerson, I'll be getting an engineering degree, will be working with not only the software aspect but also the hardware aspect and I'll finish in 4 years. Downside of Ryerson is that it's Ryerson (It's a decent university, just not the best) and that I most likely will be commuting from home (I want to move out). For Waterloo the pros are that it's Waterloo, I will be moving out and there's a possibility I can switch into engineering after 1st year. The cons are that it's computer science so I won't be working with any hardware aspects and I wasn't offered co-op. Now I love programming but the prospect of doing just programming (if I was to do computer science) for 30+ years seems like a drag.

Any advice is greatly appreciated!
Was this helpful? Yes 0
6 replies
 
A photo of baller25 baller25
go to Ryerson.I may be biased cause im going for electrical engineering. But it also sounds like you prefer an engineering degree over a computer science one. And remember a degree is a degree no matter where you go.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of SShah SShah

@baller25 wrote
go to Ryerson.I may be biased cause im going for electrical engineering. But it also sounds like you prefer an engineering degree over a computer science one. And remember a degree is a degree no matter where you go.


I do prefer and engineering degree over a computer science degree.
How is electrical engineering at Ryerson? There's no difference between electrical and computer engineering first year so I was wondering if it's difficult/easy, worth the 10+ thousand you have to spend to take the course?
And I've heard that before but I always saw it as something people from lesser known universities would say to make themselves feel better.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of greygoose greygoose

@SShah wrote
I have gotten accepted at Ryerson for computer engineering and got an alternate offer from Waterloo for computer science (regular). If I go to Ryerson, I'll be getting an engineering degree, will be working with not only the software aspect but also the hardware aspect and I'll finish in 4 years. Downside of Ryerson is that it's Ryerson (It's a decent university, just not the best) and that I most likely will be commuting from home (I want to move out). For Waterloo the pros are that it's Waterloo, I will be moving out and there's a possibility I can switch into engineering after 1st year. The cons are that it's computer science so I won't be working with any hardware aspects and I wasn't offered co-op. Now I love programming but the prospect of doing just programming (if I was to do computer science) for 30+ years seems like a drag.

Any advice is greatly appreciated!



A CS degree gives you the ability to do much more than just program. I hate development, but I like computer science, and so I am studying it!

I mentioned this somewhere in another post regarding jobs.


@greygoose wrote

[Quality assurance,] systems administration, project planning, contract work, network design and maintenance, business systems analysis (tech planning with a business spin), software design (rather than coding), algorithm design, academia, and research are all fields that you could potentially be working in.

I might add, I thought I would hate development. I specifically avoided going into CS because I thought it wasn't something I wanted to do for a living. I learned though, that especially at high levels, development jobs are much more thinking and problem solving than churning out code. Even in my entry-level co-op position, I'm learning so much and doing so much thinking I'm not bored of some of the less exciting tasks.

Ended up switching to a joint major for that reason.




I would also mention that:

- There are lots of options for you to work with hardware as a CS major at Waterloo, in particular, the "digital hardware" option on your degree. However, it sounds like you want this kind of thing to be the focus of your degree, rather than some fun side stuff, in which case I'd recommend going for the engineering degree. It's good to know your options, but follow your passion rather than what you think you should do.
- Even as a CS major, you can override into ECE (electrical/computer engineering) courses at Waterloo if you're a strong student. A friend of mine in her 2B term is taking ECE 413--pretty cool! Mind you, she has very strong math skills, being an advanced math student, and has done a bit of catchup to get to that level, but her and I are *far* from the top of the advanced classes. It's doable. As she said, it's "engineering math" and "really cool!"
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of SUMmer123456 SUMmer123456
Go to Waterloo.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of SShah SShah

@SUMmer123456 wrote
Go to Waterloo.


Any specific reason why?
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of greygoose greygoose

@SShah wrote
Any specific reason why?



Because he said so.

Seriously, this is your decision. It's up to you to get the facts and weigh the decision for yourself. I trust you will make the right decision for you, and not just blindly follow others :) If you have any other questions, I apologize for being completely unknowledgeable about Ryerson, but I will do my best to answer them!
Was this helpful? Yes 0