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Schools for undergrad - GPA differences

A photo of LawBound LawBound
I'm applying to universities next year, and was only going to apply to McGill and Trin at UofT... but now I've gotten thinking about other universities in Canada.

I've always only like Trin and McGill, but a lot of my friends (who currently go to these schools) tell me about how it's much more difficult to get a very high GPA at their schools than others like UofO or Lakehead.

I know that Law Schools don't really look at which school you went to for your undergrad, but will they not take into consideration the fact that someone has a certain GPA from say, UofT or McGill compared to another school of lesser standing?

I'm a hard worker, but if I could work the same amount at a lesser school, and get a higher GPA, then is it worth it?

I think I'm looking for reassurance, because I really love McGill and Trin, but I don't want to hurt my chances at getting into a good law school.
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A photo of canta93loupe canta93loupe
It's funny because I'm in the EXACT same position as you. McGill and Trinity are my top two choices for university next year and I'm thinking about applying to law school. And I know that law schools only care about your GPA and your LSAT score, but when it comes down to it, it all depends on where you want to apply for law school. If you want to go to a less prestigious or well-known school, then going to Lakehead and getting a 4.0 is fine. But if you want to go to one of the best law schools Canada, then prestige does start to come into play. And then when you start to look at REALLY good law schools (internationally speaking aka Harvard, Yale, etc.) then yeah, no one is going to care if you got a 4.0 from a no-name university for your undergrad.

If you really love McGill and Trinity then it really shouldn't matter though. I personally want to go to McGill/Trin because I KNOW they're going to challenge me and prepare me for law school. I want to go to a school that I KNOW I'll love for the next four years of my life. So yeah. That's just my two cents.
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A photo of stukuntz stukuntz
I'm in the same situation, torn between Trinity and Ryerson (which okay, is not prestigious but for where I am located, makes more financial sense). Honestly, in the end if you decide to do something other than law, you might want to be at a school like McGill that offers many alternatives. Keep in mind most people change their majors about 4 times :)
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A photo of nazzealcozai nazzealcozai
How about York University?
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A photo of LawBound LawBound

@canta93loupe wrote
It's funny because I'm in the EXACT same position as you. McGill and Trinity are my top two choices for university next year and I'm thinking about applying to law school. And I know that law schools only care about your GPA and your LSAT score, but when it comes down to it, it all depends on where you want to apply for law school. If you want to go to a less prestigious or well-known school, then going to Lakehead and getting a 4.0 is fine. But if you want to go to one of the best law schools Canada, then prestige does start to come into play. And then when you start to look at REALLY good law schools (internationally speaking aka Harvard, Yale, etc.) then yeah, no one is going to care if you got a 4.0 from a no-name university for your undergrad.

If you really love McGill and Trinity then it really shouldn't matter though. I personally want to go to McGill/Trin because I KNOW they're going to challenge me and prepare me for law school. I want to go to a school that I KNOW I'll love for the next four years of my life. So yeah. That's just my two cents.



I'm set on applying to either an Ivy League, Oxbridge, LSE or UofT for grad school. I wouldn't even consider applying to a lesser grad school, as I know how much grad schools matter when it comes to getting a job (especially in Law).

So do they take schools into account? Like, say, a 3.7 (UofT) vs. 4.0 (Lakehead)?
I just really don't want to mess up my chances of getting into a good law school.

I know that it will be much more difficult to get a 4.0 at UofT and McGill, rather than a lesser university, but is it possible? I wouldn't say that I'm naturally brilliant, but I make up for that in hard work. So do you think that it will be a mistake for me to choose Trin or McGill?

Thanks!
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A photo of LawBound LawBound

@nazzealcozai wrote
How about York University?



I have a few friends that go to York, and they all think that it's rubbish. Also, the teacher's union doesn't help its rep either.

I'll probably only apply to McGill and UofT. But thanks for the suggestion!
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A photo of canta93loupe canta93loupe
I think this is the best answer I have gotten in terms of this question:

If an individual has the ability to go to Harvard Law School and do well and graduate, then he or she would also have the capability of going to UofT or McGill and succeeding there.

So I think that in a way, undergrad will be a good indicator as to whether or not law school will be the right place for you. Because if you can't succeed at UofT or McGill, then how can you expect to do well at one of the best universities in the entire world? Harsh, but true.
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A photo of niklo90 niklo90

@canta93loupe wrote
I think this is the best answer I have gotten in terms of this question:

If an individual has the ability to go to Harvard Law School and do well and graduate, then he or she would also have the capability of going to UofT or McGill and succeeding there.

So I think that in a way, undergrad will be a good indicator as to whether or not law school will be the right place for you. Because if you can't succeed at UofT or McGill, then how can you expect to do well at one of the best universities in the entire world? Harsh, but true.



+1

Agreed. Undergraduate studies is a preliminary test to graduate studies. If you can't handle the work load regardless of the university, you will likely do poorly or not even qualify for graduate studies.

I suggest going to the more prestigious school. If you have the potential to get into the school with the most reputation do it. When I applied to university it was York, Uottawa, Queens, U of T and Western. I was about to settle for York for financial purposes. But Then I realized, nothing comes to you in life without hard work and determination. And I accepted Queens. Best Decision of my life. and Heck i'm not even doing to poorly at all. Im on track to getting into Law school.
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