yconic - So how exactly does University work? NEED ANSWERS!
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So how exactly does University work? NEED ANSWERS!

A photo of comebackkid comebackkid
I know this sounds like a stupid question, probably because it is, but I'm curious to know:

If I'm taking bio, chem, psych, anatomy, and math for example, will I have each class every day?
How many hours of class will I have a week?

For Science students:
What do you do for 3 hours in a bio/chem lab?
What are bio lectures like? Too much information at once, or manageable?
What is/was the "competition" like at your school, not like it matters if you're working hard and are determined though.

For res experts:
Did you find it easy to get work done in your dorm?
If I want to live in a suite/apartment style residence, will I be able to compromise between having a social life and studying life science?
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A photo of Ba Ba Blue Ba Ba Blue
Competition is nonexistent here. Anyone who competes is kind of laughed at and/or shunned, as we have a really nice collaborative atmosphere. I think it's mainly since we're a teacher school, and teachers are the kind of people who like to help others out. I love being here because it warms my heart and gives me hope for society. When I go back to Mississauga to visit on the other hand...

As for residence, it does so happen that I am an expert since I work in a residence!

It is generally not too bad getting work done in your room. The problem is that the rooms are often too small to distance yourself from distractions, so often people get distracted by Facebook and things like that. Also, if you're planning to study in the late evenings it might be more difficult (depending on the type of residence you live in), so I'd plan to do things more during the day if I were you.

As for the style, I say the compromise is definitely possible regardless of where you live. It really has more to do with how you are than the building you live in. Self control will be your key to a nice, balanced lifestyle.
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A photo of inthemaking inthemaking
You'll most likely have at least one class per day since most courses at Mac operate on a MWF and TTh lecture schedule (and then labs and tutorials alternate weekly). For example, you could have anatomy lectures Mon, Wed and Fri and then either a lab or tutorial that week. You end up being in class for less than you're used to in high school (typically 3-4 h) if you're taking 5 courses, longer if you have a lab/tutorial that day. Some days I only had 1-2 hours of class.

For bio/chem labs, you have to hand in your lab report at the end of the lab period (aside from the one formal lab you do where you take it home and type it up), so usually the first part you're doing the experiment and then you spend the rest of the time writing it up and answering the discussion questions. Lectures are very manageable if you paid attention at all in grade 12 bio/chem.

Competition was high in health sci but not towards each other, if that made any sense. Everyone was competitive but mostly with themselves. There was a lot of collaboration and helping each other out still.

Yes it was easy to get work done, I lived in Keyes though so it was a lot less noisy. It was nice because I had my own room to study in; but because there's a living room (and one of my suitemates brought a TV), we always had people over for pre-drinks, dinner, hanging out, watching tv etc.



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A photo of comebackkid comebackkid

@inthemaking wrote
You'll most likely have at least one class per day since most courses at Mac operate on a MWF and TTh lecture schedule (and then labs and tutorials alternate weekly). For example, you could have anatomy lectures Mon, Wed and Fri and then either a lab or tutorial that week. You end up being in class for less than you're used to in high school (typically 3-4 h) if you're taking 5 courses, longer if you have a lab/tutorial that day. Some days I only had 1-2 hours of class.

For bio/chem labs, you have to hand in your lab report at the end of the lab period (aside from the one formal lab you do where you take it home and type it up), so usually the first part you're doing the experiment and then you spend the rest of the time writing it up and answering the discussion questions. Lectures are very manageable if you paid attention at all in grade 12 bio/chem.

Competition was high in health sci but not towards each other, if that made any sense. Everyone was competitive but mostly with themselves. There was a lot of collaboration and helping each other out still.

Yes it was easy to get work done, I lived in Keyes though so it was a lot less noisy. It was nice because I had my own room to study in; but because there's a living room (and one of my suitemates brought a TV), we always had people over for pre-drinks, dinner, hanging out, watching tv etc.







Thanks for the advice!

Since you graduated in health science I was wondering if you could answer this one question: I missed the dead line for the supplementary application, and wanted to apply to see if I could get in, but I'll be attending this fall for level 1 life science. If I've maintained my marks and study habits at the end of first year, should I reapply for health science? I'd like to be a health professional (med or dent), probably after an MSc, and will the courses in health science or the experience provide me with any sort of "competitive edge"? The honours life science course list does include some health science courses, and geography courses (Im pretty interested in geography), but in your opinion would transferring be worth it?
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A photo of inthemaking inthemaking

@comebackkid wrote


Thanks for the advice!

Since you graduated in health science I was wondering if you could answer this one question: I missed the dead line for the supplementary application, and wanted to apply to see if I could get in, but I'll be attending this fall for level 1 life science. If I've maintained my marks and study habits at the end of first year, should I reapply for health science? I'd like to be a health professional (med or dent), probably after an MSc, and will the courses in health science or the experience provide me with any sort of "competitive edge"? The honours life science course list does include some health science courses, and geography courses (Im pretty interested in geography), but in your opinion would transferring be worth it?



I see that you're interested in a MSc in global health, and in that case I think health sci would be a better fit for you because health sci has a global health specialization where you get to spend a semester abroad in a third world country (eg. Ghana, Kenya). But actually I'm not sure if transfer students can specialize because you apply to specialize at the end of 1st year and transfer students don't find out until later if they've been accepted or not. Either way though, there are upper year health sci global health electives (which are only open to health sci students to take), I don't believe there are any in life sci.

The only other possible "edge" health sci has over life sci is that in 3rd year, you have to complete an "inquiry project", which is essentially like a mini-thesis. You have a project, a supervisor, and you have to hand in a report at the end (+ whatever else your supervisor chooses to evaluate you with, eg. lab notebook, lab presentations etc). And you can choose to continue on with your project for your 4th year thesis. This means a) you start getting research experience earlier, b) if you choose to stay with your supervisor, you don't have to compete to find a thesis supervisor in March/April when everyone is scrambling like mad to find one, c) your thesis will be a lot more productive since you already know the ropes (generally there's a huge learning curve and the first couple of months are just spent familiarizing yourself with protocols). I chose to do my inquiry project in a research lab in the pathology and molecular medicine department of the hospital but you're not limited to only lab research, a lot of people conducted clinical trials. You can also choose to find a non-health sci supervisor (eg. some of my classmates ran psych experiments, others did epidemiology field studies).

In the end it's up to you, life sci and health sci are both good programs but they are different. Life sci is broader and focuses mainly on pure science whereas health sci is more focused on the human health care field and focuses on both science and social science.
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