yconic - So yeah, EngSci
Hide Menu

My Feed Money for School Student Help Brands Winners Support Center



Explore yconic
Explore Student Life Topics
Scotiabank
STUDENT CHAMPION
yconic proudly recognizes Student Champion Partners who are providing our community with superior support for their student journeys. Learn More
Student Help Brands

So yeah, EngSci

A photo of LRooke LRooke
I went to the EngSci open house yesterday, and I saw some things that I liked (Praxis) and some things that I didn't (programming). Right now i'm just going to mirror most of the questions in this subforum:

So far I have a:

90 for Functions(12)

87 for Physics(12)

83 for Chemistry(12. Don't ask, teacher disliked me for some reason)

86 for English (12)

Right now i'm taking Calc, which should result in a low 90, Data Management(90something) and Grade 12 programming(80 IF I'M LUCKY. This won't go in my application anyway.) I've got little to no ECAs, but I have come second in a national videography competition.

What I'd like to know is how good are my chances of getting into UoT EngSci? I see that some people have gotten offers from UoT already, and their marks discourage me, but I'm still holding on to the slight glimmer of hope I might get selected. The guys over at UoT said low nineties, and I'll probably end up with high eighties as you can see, so is it sensible to believe that I'll be able to secure an offer? I've listed my second choice as ECE, and they said that you can get in with an 80, is it true?

I've also applied to Waterloo Electrical. Will I be able to get in with my marks?

P.S I applied to MacMaster Engineering, and they offered me a spot late in February.

Thanks for your help.
Was this helpful? Yes 0
18 replies
 
A photo of ChubbyNotebook ChubbyNotebook
You'll probably get into Waterloo. I have no idea about EngSci, I haven't looked into the program at all.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of wraith wraith
Assuming that you get a 90 in calc and 90 in data management, your average ends up to be ~88%, which means that the chances of you getting into engsci is very very very slim (virtually zero). You usually need at least a 90 average to have a good chance.

You should be able to get into waterloo engineering, so dont worry.

Engsci is a lot different from what it looks from the outside,and also praxis is a huge pain.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of luckystar luckystar

@wraith wrote
Assuming that you get a 90 in calc and 90 in data management, your average ends up to be ~88%, which means that the chances of you getting into engsci is very very very slim (virtually zero). You usually need at least a 90 average to have a good chance.

You should be able to get into waterloo engineering, so dont worry.

Engsci is a lot different from what it looks from the outside,and also praxis is a huge pain.



why praxis is a huge pain?
thanks
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@wraith wrote


You should be able to get into waterloo engineering, so dont worry.




Noticed you are doing ECE at UT, any comment on the quality/difficulty of the program? In relation to Waterloo's ECE program?
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of donrgt donrgt

@luckystar wrote

@wraith wrote
Assuming that you get a 90 in calc and 90 in data management, your average ends up to be ~88%, which means that the chances of you getting into engsci is very very very slim (virtually zero). You usually need at least a 90 average to have a good chance.

You should be able to get into waterloo engineering, so dont worry.

Engsci is a lot different from what it looks from the outside,and also praxis is a huge pain.



why praxis is a huge pain?
thanks



Praxis is TOO much work...When you`re being swamped by problem sets, labs, homework and project, the last thing in your mind is to write a freaking paper. And not just an ordinary report or paper, a well-argued and well-researched paper. Even grade 12 english is easier than praxis. and BTW Praxis destroyed friendships, that`s how stressful it is, so choose your group wisely. It`s the most frustrating course in first year eng sci
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of wraith wraith

@plato1 wrote

@wraith wrote


You should be able to get into waterloo engineering, so dont worry.




Noticed you are doing ECE at UT, any comment on the quality/difficulty of the program? In relation to Waterloo's ECE program?




This is my first semester in ece, so I dont think I can give you a very good comparison. Based on what I heard from my waterloo ece friends and from my u of t ece friends, I can say that it seems to me waterloo has a higher workload, but u of t has harder tests/exams, so its probably harder to get higher marks in u of t (my u of t friend didnt do as well as my waterloo ones).

In my oppinion, if your plan is to work after uni, then you should go to waterloo. Their co-op program gives you extreamly valuable exp which will help you a great deal when look for a job. However, its not very easy to get a co-op position (20% of eces of the 1T4 class did not get a position as of feb 17th). Also, co-op will only help you if are able to get engineering related job.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of wraith wraith

@donrgt wrote

@luckystar wrote

@wraith wrote
Assuming that you get a 90 in calc and 90 in data management, your average ends up to be ~88%, which means that the chances of you getting into engsci is very very very slim (virtually zero). You usually need at least a 90 average to have a good chance.

You should be able to get into waterloo engineering, so dont worry.

Engsci is a lot different from what it looks from the outside,and also praxis is a huge pain.



why praxis is a huge pain?
thanks



Praxis is TOO much work...When you`re being swamped by problem sets, labs, homework and project, the last thing in your mind is to write a freaking paper. And not just an ordinary report or paper, a well-argued and well-researched paper. Even grade 12 english is easier than praxis. and BTW Praxis destroyed friendships, that`s how stressful it is, so choose your group wisely. It`s the most frustrating course in first year eng sci




Exactly!
But one good thing is that you can do well in this course without going to lectures. I pretty much stopped going after the first few weeks.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@wraith wrote


This is my first semester in ece, so I dont think I can give you a very good comparison. Based on what I heard from my waterloo ece friends and from my u of t ece friends, I can say that it seems to me waterloo has a higher workload, but u of t has harder tests/exams, so its probably harder to get higher marks in u of t (my u of t friend didnt do as well as my waterloo ones).

In my oppinion, if your plan is to work after uni, then you should go to waterloo. Their co-op program gives you extreamly valuable exp which will help you a great deal when look for a job. However, its not very easy to get a co-op position (20% of eces of the 1T4 class did not get a position as of feb 17th). Also, co-op will only help you if are able to get engineering related job.



Thanks for the info. Actually, I am not interested in working after school, lolz. I'm going back to school from being an IT professional, and looking for the best ECE program, don't really care too much about co-op. Just trying to figure out which program has better academics, more design projects, etc. Hard to get a good comparison unless you've attended both schools, but having friends in both schools like you do is pretty close. I've sifted through some of the exams on the u of t web site, and they do seem advanced, mostly because I am not familiar with the material. But even the programming exams - where I am familiar - seemed a bit advanced for first year, especially if you're not in ECE. I'm looking for a challenge, but don't want to needlessly overwork myself for exams that are purposely designed to lower grades.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Mig Mig
I'm just a prospective student so take what I say with a spoonful of salt; it seems to me that either university can provide you with excellent preparation for grad school (which is what you seem to be after). However at U of T you are likely going to try a lot harder to get noticed (larger university). Perhaps what you should do instead is consider the specific research at each university, and see if contributing it would


@plato1 wrote

@wraith wrote


This is my first semester in ece, so I dont think I can give you a very good comparison. Based on what I heard from my waterloo ece friends and from my u of t ece friends, I can say that it seems to me waterloo has a higher workload, but u of t has harder tests/exams, so its probably harder to get higher marks in u of t (my u of t friend didnt do as well as my waterloo ones).

In my oppinion, if your plan is to work after uni, then you should go to waterloo. Their co-op program gives you extreamly valuable exp which will help you a great deal when look for a job. However, its not very easy to get a co-op position (20% of eces of the 1T4 class did not get a position as of feb 17th). Also, co-op will only help you if are able to get engineering related job.



Thanks for the info. Actually, I am not interested in working after school, lolz. I'm going back to school from being an IT professional, and looking for the best ECE program, don't really care too much about co-op. Just trying to figure out which program has better academics, more design projects, etc. Hard to get a good comparison unless you've attended both schools, but having friends in both schools like you do is pretty close. I've sifted through some of the exams on the u of t web site, and they do seem advanced, mostly because I am not familiar with the material. But even the programming exams - where I am familiar - seemed a bit advanced for first year, especially if you're not in ECE. I'm looking for a challenge, but don't want to needlessly overwork myself for exams that are purposely designed to lower grades.



Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@Mig wrote
I'm just a prospective student so take what I say with a spoonful of salt; it seems to me that either university can provide you with excellent preparation for grad school (which is what you seem to be after). However at U of T you are likely going to try a lot harder to get noticed (larger university). Perhaps what you should do instead is consider the specific research at each university, and see if contributing it would





That makes a lot of sense. And you are correct, a good grad school placement is my objective. The choice would be a lot easier if I could scrap waterloo's co-op. The research pool to choose from at U of T is so diverse, I'm almost guaranteed to find a research assistant placement for summers. Anyway, thanks for your thoughts, very succinct and perceptive.... you must have read my other thread :)

Cheers

ps. Sorry to hijack this thread :(
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of donrgt donrgt

@plato1 wrote

@Mig wrote
I'm just a prospective student so take what I say with a spoonful of salt; it seems to me that either university can provide you with excellent preparation for grad school (which is what you seem to be after). However at U of T you are likely going to try a lot harder to get noticed (larger university). Perhaps what you should do instead is consider the specific research at each university, and see if contributing it would





That makes a lot of sense. And you are correct, a good grad school placement is my objective. The choice would be a lot easier if I could scrap waterloo's co-op. The research pool to choose from at U of T is so diverse, I'm almost guaranteed to find a research assistant placement for summers. Anyway, thanks for your thoughts, very succinct and perceptive.... you must have read my other thread :)

Cheers

ps. Sorry to hijack this thread :(




I agree that the research pool in UofT is diverse however I would like to point out that it's extremely difficult to find a PAID research position in UofT, they only accept really good students. However, it's easy to find a professor and volunteer in their lab and if you're lucky they might even sponsor your research. I have emailed a lot of professors and so far they're willing to accept me but in a volunteer position. I don't know if this is true, but I think being in EngSci and having a good GPA actually help me in securing this spots. Of course I would like to be paid but in worst case scenario at least I would gain some research experience which is vital in grad school applications. There are a LOT of research opportunities, especially as an EngSci-er, however, you should be a really really really smart guy or a good writer (for writing application essays) lol :P

I've also seen your other thread and based from my experience most bell-curve helps students rather than pulling them down. Only when the class average is higher than the profs. expected average would it be bell curved down... and trust me most engineering classes have low average

And another EngSci myth... marks are not bell curved (well according to Prof. Cluett), the distribution remains the same, the marks are just increased or decreased so that the average would remain the same...
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of plato plato

@donrgt wrote

I agree that the research pool in UofT is diverse however I would like to point out that it's extremely difficult to find a PAID research position in UofT, they only accept really good students. However, it's easy to find a professor and volunteer in their lab and if you're lucky they might even sponsor your research. I have emailed a lot of professors and so far they're willing to accept me but in a volunteer position. I don't know if this is true, but I think being in EngSci and having a good GPA actually help me in securing this spots. Of course I would like to be paid but in worst case scenario at least I would gain some research experience which is vital in grad school applications. There are a LOT of research opportunities, especially as an EngSci-er, however, you should be a really really really smart guy or a good writer (for writing application essays) lol :P

I've also seen your other thread and based from my experience most bell-curve helps students rather than pulling them down. Only when the class average is higher than the profs. expected average would it be bell curved down... and trust me most engineering classes have low average

And another EngSci myth... marks are not bell curved (well according to Prof. Cluett), the distribution remains the same, the marks are just increased or decreased so that the average would remain the same...




Thanks for the heads up, always good to hear from actual students, rather than "my friend says", "they say", "everyone says"...lolz. To be honest I'm not too concerned about 'paid' positions. My interest is having the opportunity to participate in research and get direction in some of my own endeavors. One negative for UT compared to UW is the IP policy. How UT owns 'half' of anything you design/research...

As for opportunities mostly being available for eng sci... I think the brightest and most eager make opportunities for themselves. No doubt Praxis helps your writing, but I don't need to endure that pain to become a skilled technical writer :p

I was referring to mark deflation rather than bell curves, if they are in fact different things. I believe pulling 60 hour - non-midterm - school weeks in engineering is part of the success formula. Knowing the material inside and out, along with gaining an intuitive understanding of concepts rather than being a slave to formulas is also key.

Well, thanks again for the inside scoop. I'm regretting not applying for eng sci, despite my average being well within the acceptance range. I'm pretty settled on ECE with a physics minor.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of donrgt donrgt

@plato wrote

@donrgt wrote

I agree that the research pool in UofT is diverse however I would like to point out that it's extremely difficult to find a PAID research position in UofT, they only accept really good students. However, it's easy to find a professor and volunteer in their lab and if you're lucky they might even sponsor your research. I have emailed a lot of professors and so far they're willing to accept me but in a volunteer position. I don't know if this is true, but I think being in EngSci and having a good GPA actually help me in securing this spots. Of course I would like to be paid but in worst case scenario at least I would gain some research experience which is vital in grad school applications. There are a LOT of research opportunities, especially as an EngSci-er, however, you should be a really really really smart guy or a good writer (for writing application essays) lol :P

I've also seen your other thread and based from my experience most bell-curve helps students rather than pulling them down. Only when the class average is higher than the profs. expected average would it be bell curved down... and trust me most engineering classes have low average

And another EngSci myth... marks are not bell curved (well according to Prof. Cluett), the distribution remains the same, the marks are just increased or decreased so that the average would remain the same...




Thanks for the heads up, always good to hear from actual students, rather than "my friend says", "they say", "everyone says"...lolz. To be honest I'm not too concerned about 'paid' positions. My interest is having the opportunity to participate in research and get direction in some of my own endeavors. One negative for UT compared to UW is the IP policy. How UT owns 'half' of anything you design/research...

As for opportunities mostly being available for eng sci... I think the brightest and most eager make opportunities for themselves. No doubt Praxis helps your writing, but I don't need to endure that pain to become a skilled technical writer :p

I was referring to mark deflation rather than bell curves, if they are in fact different things. I believe pulling 60 hour - non-midterm - school weeks in engineering is part of the success formula. Knowing the material inside and out, along with gaining an intuitive understanding of concepts rather than being a slave to formulas is also key.

Well, thanks again for the inside scoop. I'm regretting not applying for eng sci, despite my average being well within the acceptance range. I'm pretty settled on ECE with a physics minor.




If you're pretty set to go to ECE then there's actually no need to go to EngSci. I'm in EngSci but I would not recommend the program to people who already know exactly what career path they want, (ie Civ, Chem, ECE) unless they want to go to research. Most people in EngSci right now don't know what they are going to choose as a major (including me). First two years of engsci is good for exploring your actual interests and passion. It's like, would you still love math when you are actually failing it? Because let's be honest, the things you're really good at and the things you love are not necessarily the same thing.

A 60 hour school week seems a bit too much even for EngSci. As long as you stay on top with the material that would be enough. I completely agree with you that it's actually good to have the complete understanding of concepts rather than just using formulas but sometimes it's just too much (well especially for us engsci). It's like we can't use a formula until we have proven it rigorously. And in some cases all we did in lecture is deriving the forrmula but not actually use it (incoming engscis beware of PHY180). It's like I could derive the formula for you and use it in simple problems but give me a complex problem and I would be completely lost.

Sorry if I'm ranting here haha it's just that some things are just not worth learning (proving the limit, integrability), and some things are just so obvious that you don't actually need to prove them (c'mon seriously do you really need to prove the commutativity property of addition)

Well goodluck on ECE
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Sadly the average of accepted students' reported averages for engsci tends to be 91-92%.

Below 90% average and you likely can't get in - but if you take, say, AP or IB exams and report the exam marks they can substitute for the course mark. I never reported my calculus, physics, or chemistry high school marks - just the AP exam results (all 5's, which translated into 96 per course). I did my APs in grade 10 and 11 though - you need to have finished the AP BEFORE your application.

Also, engsci sucks. I didn't stay for more than a semester even though my average was more than high enough for me to stay if I wanted to. ECE ftw.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of LRooke LRooke
Thanks for your help. I was leaning towards EE anyway.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of LRooke LRooke
Sorry, just one more general question:

Suppose I join the CF for two years; will it raise my mark in any way once I reapply after the end of my stint?
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@LRooke wrote
Sorry, just one more general question:

Suppose I join the CF for two years; will it raise my mark in any way once I reapply after the end of my stint?



does CF mean canadian forces?

It doesn't matter when you apply, when you enroll, you're still a frosh beginner and you're in the exact same boat as everyone else. You can enroll 10 years later and nothing special will be given to you, and you don't lose anything either.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of luckystar luckystar

@wraith wrote

@donrgt wrote

@luckystar wrote

@wraith wrote
Assuming that you get a 90 in calc and 90 in data management, your average ends up to be ~88%, which means that the chances of you getting into engsci is very very very slim (virtually zero). You usually need at least a 90 average to have a good chance.

You should be able to get into waterloo engineering, so dont worry.

Engsci is a lot different from what it looks from the outside,and also praxis is a huge pain.



why praxis is a huge pain?
thanks



Praxis is TOO much work...When you`re being swamped by problem sets, labs, homework and project, the last thing in your mind is to write a freaking paper. And not just an ordinary report or paper, a well-argued and well-researched paper. Even grade 12 english is easier than praxis. and BTW Praxis destroyed friendships, that`s how stressful it is, so choose your group wisely. It`s the most frustrating course in first year eng sci




Exactly!
But one good thing is that you can do well in this course without going to lectures. I pretty much stopped going after the first few weeks.



thanks: you guys are so helpful
Was this helpful? Yes 0