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Starting Close to Home, Then Big University?

A photo of dkonieczny dkonieczny
I've been faced with the dilemma of starting out in a small college, or straight into big city University. I'm planning on getting my Bachelor of Science, then moving on to become a Dietitian. I'm from a small town, and live in the country, so I figured if I go to the college, and take one year there and move on, would it be an easier transition? I've been accepted into the college, but I await details from the university. But then If I start there will I be behind in the social aspect of University? Would I be behind in learning the campus? What's your opinion.
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A photo of clarab clarab
Why not just go to a smaller university?

Size does not necessarily indicate quality, and there are plenty of small universities which offer excellent degrees in nutrition and dietetics, such as Acadia.
Or, why not go to a university's affiliate college, such as Huron at Western? That way you'll still be at a big university, but you'll be in a much smaller community within the school.

I've met plenty of people at UWO (where I currently go) who come from smaller towns and they seem to be getting on fine. I myself come from a small community just outside a larger city in the Maritimes, and by "large city" I mean 60,000 people, so really it is quite small, and I went to school in that city. For me there's been absolutely no problem transitioning to a larger city/university.

But then again, it's really about who you are, where your comfort zone is, and what you feel would benefit you the most.
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
Yeah, I know a few people from Western who are from small towns (pop < 10 000), and I know A LOT of people from U of A (which is in Edmonton) who are from small towns... probably half of my class fits that description and most of my friends do. They all seemed to have adapted without a hitch.
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A photo of biosci biosci
I would say just go to university, it was a big change even for me coming from a bigger city but I love Guelph and the university too. You get accustomed to things really fast. It's just the experience of leaving home too. The freedom,responsibility and independence that comes with it. It's amazing.
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A photo of Zion Zion
I'm planning on moving away from home and going into a big university/city. I think I need a change and the adjustment will provide me with an experience to mature and learn. I say go for it, unless you're the type who gets homesick really easily.
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A photo of cosstickxx cosstickxx

@dkonieczny wrote
I've been faced with the dilemma of starting out in a small college, or straight into big city University. I'm planning on getting my Bachelor of Science, then moving on to become a Dietitian. I'm from a small town, and live in the country, so I figured if I go to the college, and take one year there and move on, would it be an easier transition? I've been accepted into the college, but I await details from the university. But then If I start there will I be behind in the social aspect of University? Would I be behind in learning the campus? What's your opinion.



why don't you just go into a program that will give you a bachelor of science in foods & nutrition? it would save you a few years.
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A photo of dkonieczny dkonieczny

why don't you just go into a program that will give you a bachelor of science in foods & nutrition? it would save you a few years.



That's actually what I'm doing thanks.In order to become a Registered dietitian, i need that bachelor of science, then an internship after.
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A photo of cosstickxx cosstickxx
sorry... I was confused. i thought you wanted to do general science and then nutrition.
also, I think it would be kind of a waste of time to do a year of college if you don't need to. what schools are you looking at? I come from a small town, and the transition to a "larger city" was actually a lot easier than i expected (granted that London may be smaller than other cities)
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