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Stating Language Proficiency on a Resume

A photo of Gorges26 Gorges26
Anybody know how proficient you have to be in a language before you can list it as a skill in your resume?

I've been studying Spanish for a while now, and while I'm nowhere near fluent and still have much more studying to do, I can understand and communicate basic sentences. How proficient someone feels they are in a language is subjective yet you have to be completely honest on a resume, so is there some way to gauge whether or not you're "proficient enough"?
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I guess it depends on what you're applying for. If you were to be a translator, listing Spanish when you're not fluent wouldn't be a good idea. But if you're applying for a job where you're 99.999999% sure you'll never use it, you'll probably never be tested to prove you're more/less proficient than you claim. But then there's the argument of why it needs to be put on your resume if it's not needed. The only thing you could really do is back it up with credentials. If you have some sort of certificate, are a native speaker (doesn't apply to you), or have taken multiple language courses then you can list that. Otherwise you could just put that you have basic proficiency and if they ask you about it you could explain why you think you have basic proficiency. Or you could always put it under "interests" or "hobbies" or whatever such a section may be called if it exists on your resume.

But you're right, it's completely subjective for the most part.
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A photo of Gorges26 Gorges26
For sure; thanks for the response. I've actually been studying Spanish for a job I plan on applying for next summer which would involve work in Latin America, so I have a bit of time to get better at it. Since learning the language would just be for basic communication there, so I'm hoping my potential employer wouldn't be too picky with how much I know. lol

A proficiency test/certification sounds like a good idea though.
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A photo of ninetyfour ninetyfour
Yeah with a proficiency test/certification, you can put down a specific level of your language fluency so that it isn't vague. My French teacher just told me that everyone graduating from high school after doing French all throughout will be at a B1 level, or something like that, so I know what I can put on a resume.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@Gorges26 wrote
Anybody know how proficient you have to be in a language before you can list it as a skill in your resume?

I've been studying Spanish for a while now, and while I'm nowhere near fluent and still have much more studying to do, I can understand and communicate basic sentences. How proficient someone feels they are in a language is subjective yet you have to be completely honest on a resume, so is there some way to gauge whether or not you're "proficient enough"?




You could of course take the government's language test. They use rankings as follows:

A - basic: can use basic words and sentences to communictae
B - intermediate: can have a fairly fluid conversation with someone with few errors
C - advanced: fully fluent in the language

If you think you can meet one of these levels, put it down. Otherwise, don't bother until you can be objectively measured by one of these levels.

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A photo of SUMmer123456 SUMmer123456

@ARMY101 wrote

@Gorges26 wrote
Anybody know how proficient you have to be in a language before you can list it as a skill in your resume?

I've been studying Spanish for a while now, and while I'm nowhere near fluent and still have much more studying to do, I can understand and communicate basic sentences. How proficient someone feels they are in a language is subjective yet you have to be completely honest on a resume, so is there some way to gauge whether or not you're "proficient enough"?




You could of course take the government's language test. They use rankings as follows:

A - basic: can use basic words and sentences to communictae
B - intermediate: can have a fairly fluid conversation with someone with few errors
C - advanced: fully fluent in the language

If you think you can meet one of these levels, put it down. Otherwise, don't bother until you can be objectively measured by one of these levels.





ARMY's way is probably the most objective way of doing it. Also, allows you to keep yourself safe in the future if they ever need you to use your proficiency and you aren't up to their standards.
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