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Stuff my father is forcing me to study Petroleum in UA.........

A photo of funnie funnie
I was originally planning to studying track one engineering in UofT.
But then I accidentally let my dad know that University of Alberta has a Petroleum engineering program last.night...
So now he wants me to give up UofT and be prepare to enter the juicy oil industry........

I dont know what to do now... I think UofT has a much better reputation than UA... thats why i want to study in UofT.
Do you guys think I should use the argument that UofT has a mineral engineering program, which is somewhat similar to Petroleum?
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A photo of greygoose greygoose

@funnie wrote
I was originally planning to studying track one engineering in UofT.
But then I accidentally let my dad know that University of Alberta has a Petroleum engineering program last.night...
So now he wants me to give up UofT and be prepare to enter the juicy oil industry........

I dont know what to do now... I think UofT has a much better reputation than UA... thats why i want to study in UofT.
Do you guys think I should use the argument that UofT has a mineral engineering program, which is somewhat similar to Petroleum?



Petroleum engineers definitely have the highest salaries, because the oil industry is so lucrative... for now.

Tell your father to bugger off, and do what you'd like to do. The reputation of the engineering school you attend in Canada really doesn't matter; if it's a university, it's pretty much equivalent. You might see discrimination between Ryerson and UofT, but not UofT and UofA.

I think you should figure out if you actually want to be staring at hydrocarbons the rest of your career, and see if you actually like playing with them before you commit to the field. I hope you really like the chemistry of things that burn. What do you think you're interested in?
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A photo of funnie funnie

@greygoose wrote

@funnie wrote
I was originally planning to studying track one engineering in UofT.
But then I accidentally let my dad know that University of Alberta has a Petroleum engineering program last.night...
So now he wants me to give up UofT and be prepare to enter the juicy oil industry........

I dont know what to do now... I think UofT has a much better reputation than UA... thats why i want to study in UofT.
Do you guys think I should use the argument that UofT has a mineral engineering program, which is somewhat similar to Petroleum?



Petroleum engineers definitely have the highest salaries, because the oil industry is so lucrative... for now.

Tell your father to bugger off, and do what you'd like to do. The reputation of the engineering school you attend in Canada really doesn't matter; if it's a university, it's pretty much equivalent. You might see discrimination between Ryerson and UofT, but not UofT and UofA.

I think you should figure out if you actually want to be staring at hydrocarbons the rest of your career, and see if you actually like playing with them before you commit to the field. I hope you really like the chemistry of things that burn. What do you think you're interested in?




well i havent found one area that i am interested in yet...
I am actually okay about studying oil stuff, but just really dont want to study in Alberta...
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A photo of ktel ktel
If you want to do petroleum engineering you should go to U of A hands down. The oil industry is in Alberta, it makes no sense to study it elsewhere. If you don't want to do petroleum engineering, then go wherever you want, but do a general first year program if you're unsure.

I'm totally biased towards the U of A, did my undergrad there. U of T does have better reputation, but not MUCH better, U of A is considered among the top in the country. I would NEVER suggest you should choose a school based on reputation. You should choose it based on program availability, courses, atmosphere, size, etc. but reputation should be pretty far down on your priority list.

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A photo of funnie funnie
What about Mineral Engineering? Both UA and UT offer this program.
Anybody knows what Mineral Engineering is like?
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A photo of greygoose greygoose

@funnie wrote
What about Mineral Engineering? Both UA and UT offer this program.
Anybody knows what Mineral Engineering is like?



You study rocks...? Seriously, don't take the word of an internet forum. Go study this for yourself.

Why do you want to be an engineer? List five reasons, and maybe people can help guide you in the right direction.

By the way, if the reasons are: job security, good pay, respectable work, etc... while respectable work is an admirable goal, the former two are *not* good enough reasons to choose a career. Never get stuck doing something you're not crazy about, at least until you're 40 and job security matters. :) What fields have interested you in terms of study, inside and outside school?
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A photo of rightsaidfred rightsaidfred

@funnie wrote
I was originally planning to studying track one engineering in UofT.
But then I accidentally let my dad know that University of Alberta has a Petroleum engineering program last.night...
So now he wants me to give up UofT and be prepare to enter the juicy oil industry........

I dont know what to do now... I think UofT has a much better reputation than UA... thats why i want to study in UofT.
Do you guys think I should use the argument that UofT has a mineral engineering program, which is somewhat similar to Petroleum?



Your DAD is forcing you to study something?
Are you Asian?

Anyway petroleum engineering is great. You'll be the top of the salary for engineers.
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A photo of funnie funnie
well why not... I don't find studying C++ or robotics interesting...
And geology is fairly new to me, so maybe I will like it.
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A photo of greygoose greygoose

@funnie wrote
well why not... I don't find studying C++ or robotics interesting...
And geology is fairly new to me, so maybe I will like it.



C++ is a really ugly language, so no wonder you don't like it. You do realize that very little of what a proper CS major does is monkey out code, right? The people making the big bucks in the field are developing algorithms to solve problems cleverly. And the top people in the field rarely will use C++. Even if you're doing embedded systems. Then you'll be doing C and assembly. And on the other end of the spectrum, you're likely to be using Haskell or some form of Lisp, which can be compiled to run as fast as C.

What do you know about robotics? If you confine your knowledge to Lego, you're not doing yourself any favors.

You've basically told me that you've confined your career choices to "mechanical engineer" and "code monkey." No wonder you feel forced to go into a field to look at rocks. Why is it that you don't like robotics? You're going to find a lot of very engineer-y things about that field that will also apply to geological engineering.

Don't you think it's a bit silly to base your life's decision on "it's fairly new to me, maybe I will like it"? You should at least *start* looking into the fields. Here are some wikipedia links to get you started.

Petroleum Engineering: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petroleum_engineering
Geological Engineering: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Engineering_geology
http://ugradcalendar.uwaterloo.ca/page/ENG-Geological-Engineering (a blurb from UW)

There are some other kinds of engineering you ought to look at, Electrical in particular is always in high demand because it's a challenging field (they use lots of very difficult mathematics): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_engineering
http://ugradcalendar.uwaterloo.ca/page/ENG-Computer-Engineering-Electrical-Engineering

And one last one to get you looking, here are a few introductory topics in computer science that aren't your run-of-the-mill C++:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_search
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_O_notation
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_tree
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linked_list
This language is Scheme, so you don't think programming is limited to the C-like language paradigm: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scheme_%28programming_language%29

Note that if you refuse to read all this, you've basically said that you refuse to do any research for your future and you're basing the next 50 years of your life on an uninformed decision. Think about that.
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A photo of ktel ktel

@greygoose wrote

By the way, if the reasons are: job security, good pay, respectable work, etc... while respectable work is an admirable goal, the former two are *not* good enough reasons to choose a career. Never get stuck doing something you're not crazy about, at least until you're 40 and job security matters. :) What fields have interested you in terms of study, inside and outside school?



I completely disagree. I think the first two reasons are GREAT reasons to choose a career, and far more students should keep this in mind before they pick what degree to get. That's why our generation can't find jobs, because they're unemployable.

And U of A doesn't have "mineral engineering". Do you mean mining or materials?

You're going to have to take a programming course regardless of what engineering discipline you're in. You may hate it but pay attention because it is pretty useful.
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A photo of greygoose greygoose

@ktel wrote

@greygoose wrote

By the way, if the reasons are: job security, good pay ...



I completely disagree. I think the first two reasons are GREAT reasons to choose a career, and far more students should keep this in mind before they pick what degree to get. That's why our generation can't find jobs, because they're unemployable.



No, it's because every bub goes out and gets an English literature degree, *then* tries to find work, because they think a degree is necessary in order to find work. But they have no idea what kind of work to be looking for, and so they just end up getting themselves in debt over nothing.

No. The vast majority of people know where the money is in terms of careers. It's currently in finance and business. How long will that last? Financial and business people are overpaid for their work. There's a bit of a bubble in that sector of the workforce. When it pops, all those people that went out to specialize in business are going to be out of work.

What about actuarial science? Look at the incredible amount of interest in the field. UW has a marks cutoff for the major because it's too competitive. But wait... there are only 3000 licensed actuaries in Canada, and a few more in the United States. Sure, the job is high paying, secure, and damn well boring. But how the heck do people justify graduating with this kind of degree with 500 others every year when the demand is so low? Well, the field sure is fashionable...

Look at how many people go into "computer science" because they think it makes money, when they were more appropriate for a technical school.

I know far too many unhappy engineers and financial majors and premed students and prelaw students because their parents pushed them into the field or they're just doing it for the money or whatever. In reality, they never took the time to figure out what they wanted to do, they end up sinking over $40,000 into a degree they don't really want over four years, and they're miserable for the rest of their livings making their 90k salary. Maybe it's 6-figures. If they're unhappy, they're not going to get promoted, and no amount of money is going to buy them happiness.
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A photo of funnie funnie

@ktel wrote

@greygoose wrote

By the way, if the reasons are: job security, good pay, respectable work, etc... while respectable work is an admirable goal, the former two are *not* good enough reasons to choose a career. Never get stuck doing something you're not crazy about, at least until you're 40 and job security matters. :) What fields have interested you in terms of study, inside and outside school?



I completely disagree. I think the first two reasons are GREAT reasons to choose a career, and far more students should keep this in mind before they pick what degree to get. That's why our generation can't find jobs, because they're unemployable.

And U of A doesn't have "mineral engineering". Do you mean mining or materials?

You're going to have to take a programming course regardless of what engineering discipline you're in. You may hate it but pay attention because it is pretty useful.



Oh so there is a difference between Mineral and Mining? I thought they are the same.
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A photo of ktel ktel
I'm saying U of A doesn't call it mineral engineering, they call it mining engineering. That's where you will learn about mining (duh). It's a fairly lucrative field if you want to live up North.
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@ktel wrote
I'm saying U of A doesn't call it mineral engineering, they call it mining engineering. That's where you will learn about mining (duh). It's a fairly lucrative field if you want to live up North.


i though there are fairly amount of mining companies in Ontairo right.....
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A photo of ktel ktel
Yup, there are a lot of mining companies in Ontario, but as a mining engineer you'll typically be on site in remote locations. You're likely not going to begin your career as a mining engineer in an office in a major urban center
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A photo of AKhan11 AKhan11
Here try taking this quiz offered by the university of Waterloo:
[url]http://www.engineering.uwaterloo.ca/future/undergrad/quiz/quiz.html[/url]
This quiz is not intended to shove you into an engineering field, rather it provides you with options that you may be interested in.
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