yconic - To all former IB students
Hide Menu

My Feed Money for School Student Help Brands Winners Support Center



Explore yconic
Explore Student Life Topics
Scotiabank
STUDENT CHAMPION
yconic proudly recognizes Student Champion Partners who are providing our community with superior support for their student journeys. Learn More
Student Help Brands

To all former IB students

A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
I just wanted to know if being an IB student actually helped for university in terms of admissions and first year university life.

Thanks a lot! :)
Was this helpful? Yes 0
20 replies
 
A photo of LXY LXY
It really depends on perspective. I'll try to tackle your question on admissions as I'm in Year 2 IB right now.

It really depends on the type of person you are. For the most part, the marks of a typical IB student will be slightly lower than that of an academic. Some schools use a conversion system, some do not. It really depends on your school. If there is no conversion system, I feel that some people(usually the people who had lower marks to begin with) will feel "screwed-over" by the system. Generally, (from my school), the people who quit IB find a 10-15 percent rise in their marks. However, if you think about it, if you got 90s in IB, chances are your marks won't rise more than 1-2 percent.

No university will ever openly and concisely claim that IBs are better than other students. It is generally accepted however, that IBs did more work to get the same marks. Also, the idea of grade inflation is greatly reduced, so you will not have a lot of people whose marks drop about 30 percent first year. However, I don't believe that there has been an IB graduate who has not gotten into university from my school.

My advice for you is this: If you feel like you will be near the top of your class, or at least significantly above average: I would go for it. I felt like I would have trouble getting into some programs this year. I still got into most of them, despite having lower marks than some others.

In terms of first year, most people come back saying how it's completely chills. Of course, this depends on the program.

Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Serendipity Serendipity
I'm currently in the IB Diploma Program.

Considering that you are eligible to "skip" 3 courses minimum first year I expect to have a easy first year :)
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of jessiexo jessiexo
In IB2... I think it's worth it. The style of learning prepares you a lot. Esp if you take HL Sciences, the way you do labs is like university.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Snack Snack
my school doesnt even offer IB or AP
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@LXY wrote
It really depends on perspective. I'll try to tackle your question on admissions as I'm in Year 2 IB right now.

It really depends on the type of person you are. For the most part, the marks of a typical IB student will be slightly lower than that of an academic. Some schools use a conversion system, some do not. It really depends on your school. If there is no conversion system, I feel that some people(usually the people who had lower marks to begin with) will feel "screwed-over" by the system. Generally, (from my school), the people who quit IB find a 10-15 percent rise in their marks. However, if you think about it, if you got 90s in IB, chances are your marks won't rise more than 1-2 percent.

No university will ever openly and concisely claim that IBs are better than other students. It is generally accepted however, that IBs did more work to get the same marks. Also, the idea of grade inflation is greatly reduced, so you will not have a lot of people whose marks drop about 30 percent first year. However, I don't believe that there has been an IB graduate who has not gotten into university from my school.

My advice for you is this: If you feel like you will be near the top of your class, or at least significantly above average: I would go for it. I felt like I would have trouble getting into some programs this year. I still got into most of them, despite having lower marks than some others.

In terms of first year, most people come back saying how it's completely chills. Of course, this depends on the program.





Thanks for your response!

I was just wondering if you know of any body (or even yourself) who has gotten into competitive programs with marginally lower averages than the given cut off?
And do you know if universities like IB students?
I mean, obviously if a student in IB is doing poorly (i.e. 70s) vs a student in the academic stream who is doing excellent (i.e. 90s), they're obviously going to accept the latter. However, if both students had similar averages, would universities recognize IB status and the caliber of the IB student?

Thanks!
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Tlee93 Tlee93

@unibound888 wrote

@LXY wrote
It really depends on perspective. I'll try to tackle your question on admissions as I'm in Year 2 IB right now.

It really depends on the type of person you are. For the most part, the marks of a typical IB student will be slightly lower than that of an academic. Some schools use a conversion system, some do not. It really depends on your school. If there is no conversion system, I feel that some people(usually the people who had lower marks to begin with) will feel "screwed-over" by the system. Generally, (from my school), the people who quit IB find a 10-15 percent rise in their marks. However, if you think about it, if you got 90s in IB, chances are your marks won't rise more than 1-2 percent.

No university will ever openly and concisely claim that IBs are better than other students. It is generally accepted however, that IBs did more work to get the same marks. Also, the idea of grade inflation is greatly reduced, so you will not have a lot of people whose marks drop about 30 percent first year. However, I don't believe that there has been an IB graduate who has not gotten into university from my school.

My advice for you is this: If you feel like you will be near the top of your class, or at least significantly above average: I would go for it. I felt like I would have trouble getting into some programs this year. I still got into most of them, despite having lower marks than some others.

In terms of first year, most people come back saying how it's completely chills. Of course, this depends on the program.






Thanks for your response!

I was just wondering if you know of any body (or even yourself) who has gotten into competitive programs with marginally lower averages than the given cut off?
And do you know if universities like IB students?
I mean, obviously if a student in IB is doing poorly (i.e. 70s) vs a student in the academic stream who is doing excellent (i.e. 90s), they're obviously going to accept the latter. However, if both students had similar averages, would universities recognize IB status and the caliber of the IB student?

Thanks!



To answer your first question, I'm in IB Year 2 right now. I got into UWO's IVEY with an average of 89, which is slightly lower than the usual 90 +.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@Tlee93 wrote

@unibound888 wrote

@LXY wrote
It really depends on perspective. I'll try to tackle your question on admissions as I'm in Year 2 IB right now.

It really depends on the type of person you are. For the most part, the marks of a typical IB student will be slightly lower than that of an academic. Some schools use a conversion system, some do not. It really depends on your school. If there is no conversion system, I feel that some people(usually the people who had lower marks to begin with) will feel "screwed-over" by the system. Generally, (from my school), the people who quit IB find a 10-15 percent rise in their marks. However, if you think about it, if you got 90s in IB, chances are your marks won't rise more than 1-2 percent.

No university will ever openly and concisely claim that IBs are better than other students. It is generally accepted however, that IBs did more work to get the same marks. Also, the idea of grade inflation is greatly reduced, so you will not have a lot of people whose marks drop about 30 percent first year. However, I don't believe that there has been an IB graduate who has not gotten into university from my school.

My advice for you is this: If you feel like you will be near the top of your class, or at least significantly above average: I would go for it. I felt like I would have trouble getting into some programs this year. I still got into most of them, despite having lower marks than some others.

In terms of first year, most people come back saying how it's completely chills. Of course, this depends on the program.






Thanks for your response!

I was just wondering if you know of any body (or even yourself) who has gotten into competitive programs with marginally lower averages than the given cut off?
And do you know if universities like IB students?
I mean, obviously if a student in IB is doing poorly (i.e. 70s) vs a student in the academic stream who is doing excellent (i.e. 90s), they're obviously going to accept the latter. However, if both students had similar averages, would universities recognize IB status and the caliber of the IB student?

Thanks!



To answer your first question, I'm in IB Year 2 right now. I got into UWO's IVEY with an average of 89, which is slightly lower than the usual 90 +.



Wow congrats! Just wondering, what were your extracurriculars? :) Thanks!
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of QCman QCman
I did IB in high school and im finishing my first year qt Queen's. Here are the plus points i would give IB

1) Reduced workload later due to credits transfer
2) You learn a lot more about other subject areas making you more knowledgeable then your normal school peers.
3) If you take HL math with Stats as your option paper, you will find first year math a breeze
4) Teaches you how to think, i am convinced that learning science helps you think better and makes you question things and are more critical which is a key skill for business success.
5) You are more prepared for the workload

Would i do IB again, yes, plus i feel a standardized testing system is much better then the garbage Ontario system. I have met people with 97% averages who are not as intelligent as people with 87% averages from a different school. This isnt the case so much in IB schools in Canada but at my school the grading was also done to an IB scale which meant all my tests were really difficult and getting a 6 in HL physics needed a 67% or something which converts to a 90% in Ontario. Though this may seem insane but i can totally see how my 67% compared to an Ontario grade of a 90% because grades in ontario are insanely inflated. This also meant i was well prepared for the shock of getting a 60 on an exam in uni because i was used to it, where as ontario kids who got 90's all their life were freaking out.

Not a doubt in my mind, im putting my kids in IB or whatever the equivalent will be by then.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@QCman wrote
I did IB in high school and im finishing my first year qt Queen's. Here are the plus points i would give IB

1) Reduced workload later due to credits transfer
2) You learn a lot more about other subject areas making you more knowledgeable then your normal school peers.
3) If you take HL math with Stats as your option paper, you will find first year math a breeze
4) Teaches you how to think, i am convinced that learning science helps you think better and makes you question things and are more critical which is a key skill for business success.
5) You are more prepared for the workload

Would i do IB again, yes, plus i feel a standardized testing system is much better then the garbage Ontario system. I have met people with 97% averages who are not as intelligent as people with 87% averages from a different school. This isnt the case so much in IB schools in Canada but at my school the grading was also done to an IB scale which meant all my tests were really difficult and getting a 6 in HL physics needed a 67% or something which converts to a 90% in Ontario. Though this may seem insane but i can totally see how my 67% compared to an Ontario grade of a 90% because grades in ontario are insanely inflated. This also meant i was well prepared for the shock of getting a 60 on an exam in uni because i was used to it, where as ontario kids who got 90's all their life were freaking out.

Not a doubt in my mind, im putting my kids in IB or whatever the equivalent will be by then.



Cool, thanks for the response! And congratulations on your success so far! :)

I'm just wondering, what programs did you apply for? Did you apply to Ivey?
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of speedy48 speedy48

@Tlee93 wrote

@unibound888 wrote

@LXY wrote
It really depends on perspective. I'll try to tackle your question on admissions as I'm in Year 2 IB right now.

It really depends on the type of person you are. For the most part, the marks of a typical IB student will be slightly lower than that of an academic. Some schools use a conversion system, some do not. It really depends on your school. If there is no conversion system, I feel that some people(usually the people who had lower marks to begin with) will feel "screwed-over" by the system. Generally, (from my school), the people who quit IB find a 10-15 percent rise in their marks. However, if you think about it, if you got 90s in IB, chances are your marks won't rise more than 1-2 percent.

No university will ever openly and concisely claim that IBs are better than other students. It is generally accepted however, that IBs did more work to get the same marks. Also, the idea of grade inflation is greatly reduced, so you will not have a lot of people whose marks drop about 30 percent first year. However, I don't believe that there has been an IB graduate who has not gotten into university from my school.

My advice for you is this: If you feel like you will be near the top of your class, or at least significantly above average: I would go for it. I felt like I would have trouble getting into some programs this year. I still got into most of them, despite having lower marks than some others.

In terms of first year, most people come back saying how it's completely chills. Of course, this depends on the program.






Thanks for your response!

I was just wondering if you know of any body (or even yourself) who has gotten into competitive programs with marginally lower averages than the given cut off?
And do you know if universities like IB students?
I mean, obviously if a student in IB is doing poorly (i.e. 70s) vs a student in the academic stream who is doing excellent (i.e. 90s), they're obviously going to accept the latter. However, if both students had similar averages, would universities recognize IB status and the caliber of the IB student?

Thanks!



To answer your first question, I'm in IB Year 2 right now. I got into UWO's IVEY with an average of 89, which is slightly lower than the usual 90 +.



I am actually not an IB student nor have ever been enrolled in the program but I also recently received AEO status with an 89.5 average.

Truthfully, I don't believe IB students receive any preferences unless they apply to schools outside of their country. That's the whole point of IB isn't it though? It's internationally recognized and standardized across the world so if your doing it I think it's only beneficial if you apply outside Canada.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
This post was deleted

 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
@Speedy48 Then you probably had some amazing ECs!

I just think that IB students are more prepared for the work load at least. I'm not saying that IB kids are better or whatever. I just was wondering if for most former IB students, they were given a little bit of leeway with their averages because of the fact that they were IB.

And yes, you're right, IB is definitely recognized overseas, but most Ontario students prefer to say in Ontario for some reason (maybe b/c of family, friends, etc.)Either way, I think IB has its pros and cons.

Thanks for the reply, though! :)
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of QCman QCman
i did apply to ivye and laurier also, got in both.

With regards to grades leeway, obviously no one on this forum can answer because none of us work in admissions but what i can tell you is my grades were on the lower side, a 35 predicted , queens asks for a 34( without bonus), which isn't that high, but to be fair i had a lot of ec's and i had done a lot of them for 3-4 years. Also i was the only person at my school applying to queens ( i didnt go to highschool in canada) so i was the default for chancellors even though technically i wasn't qualified to apply with my grades. Ivey asks for a 36 with bonus, my school doesn't predict bonus points so i sent in a transcript with a 35 on it and i still got in first round.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@QCman wrote
i did apply to ivye and laurier also, got in both.

With regards to grades leeway, obviously no one on this forum can answer because none of us work in admissions but what i can tell you is my grades were on the lower side, a 35 predicted , queens asks for a 34( without bonus), which isn't that high, but to be fair i had a lot of ec's and i had done a lot of them for 3-4 years. Also i was the only person at my school applying to queens ( i didnt go to highschool in canada) so i was the default for chancellors even though technically i wasn't qualified to apply with my grades. Ivey asks for a 36 with bonus, my school doesn't predict bonus points so i sent in a transcript with a 35 on it and i still got in first round.



I see. That's interesting, thanks! I'm just really nervous because I want to get into Ivey, but my average is a 86.5%. My ECs, I would say are pretty much up there. My essays aren't bad either... So given that my supplementary was good and given that I'm an IB student, will they kinda look past the low average?
Was this helpful? Yes 1

 
A photo of speedy48 speedy48
haha thanks! I don't want to say anything that will give you false hope or bring you down but I think it will come down to your essays and ECs. I remember going to the Ivey open house and talking to one of the admission officers and they said that in the past they have accepted people with less than your current average (86.5%).

The most memorable applicant they accepted with a lower average was a student who played on the canadian rugby team and was a part of deca. Those were his only ECs and he got in with an 85%.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of North North
As has been said before, in Ontario there really isn't a big distinction between IB and non-IB students with regards to admissions that anyone can see.

Where I believe IB helped me was the challenge of it. I honestly believe that I would have done significantly worse in my core classes if I had not taken IB. Most of the Ontario Curriculum and corresponding assignments are ridiculous. I truly think I would have been bored in the regular academic stream. But a lot of it is the way that you learn. If you think you'd learn better in IB than academic then take it, but if you'll learn better without IB then don't take it.

It all comes down to how well you learn and how you can show that knowledge.

The other benefit of IB though is the trandsfer credits you can get at some universities. Most prominently at my school were students going to McGill - a bunch went straight into 2nd year. The ones that didn't skip all of first year only didn't because they needed specific pre-requisite university courses because they were in neuroscience.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Serendipity Serendipity
Western takes transfer credits I believe from HL courses which you score 6+ in.

So you save some money and time :)
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of colakid123 colakid123
I'm in year 2 of IB and have done 2 SLs and all my IAs already. If your school doesn't convert IB marks, I don't recommend it, NOT worth it. If it does and you think you can handle it, it's an option. IB didn't help me get in per se because I would have gotten into everything anyway (my marks are high and my programs were easy).

PROS
-early acceptances (this might be due to having my top 6 already, but I got in really early for everything)
-higher level courses do university styles papers and labs
-surrounded by motivated people (group work is better)
-transfer credit
-CONVERSIONS!!!

CONS
-not actually beneficial assuming you want to stay in Canada
-people can be competitive pricks who lie and use each other (not nearly everyone though, and this doesn't only happen in IB by any means)
-doesn't give you as much university credit as you thought it would
-unnecessarily stressful
-fees if there are any
-there will still be a HUGE difference in how teachers mark, standardized schmandardized (even if they get modded, it's too late to change much because predicted marks are it)
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of LXY LXY

@unibound888 wrote

@LXY wrote
It really depends on perspective. I'll try to tackle your question on admissions as I'm in Year 2 IB right now.

It really depends on the type of person you are. For the most part, the marks of a typical IB student will be slightly lower than that of an academic. Some schools use a conversion system, some do not. It really depends on your school. If there is no conversion system, I feel that some people(usually the people who had lower marks to begin with) will feel "screwed-over" by the system. Generally, (from my school), the people who quit IB find a 10-15 percent rise in their marks. However, if you think about it, if you got 90s in IB, chances are your marks won't rise more than 1-2 percent.

No university will ever openly and concisely claim that IBs are better than other students. It is generally accepted however, that IBs did more work to get the same marks. Also, the idea of grade inflation is greatly reduced, so you will not have a lot of people whose marks drop about 30 percent first year. However, I don't believe that there has been an IB graduate who has not gotten into university from my school.

My advice for you is this: If you feel like you will be near the top of your class, or at least significantly above average: I would go for it. I felt like I would have trouble getting into some programs this year. I still got into most of them, despite having lower marks than some others.

In terms of first year, most people come back saying how it's completely chills. Of course, this depends on the program.





Thanks for your response!

I was just wondering if you know of any body (or even yourself) who has gotten into competitive programs with marginally lower averages than the given cut off?
And do you know if universities like IB students?
I mean, obviously if a student in IB is doing poorly (i.e. 70s) vs a student in the academic stream who is doing excellent (i.e. 90s), they're obviously going to accept the latter. However, if both students had similar averages, would universities recognize IB status and the caliber of the IB student?

Thanks!




Well I'll use myself and a couple of friends as examples.
I recently got into Ivey, as well as UW/WLU Double degree(UW side). My Average is 90.5. I have slightly above average ECs.
My friend has 96ish average. She's gotten wait-listed by Harvard/Yale, and got into NYU.
My other friend has 95ish average, and he's gotten both engsci and mechatronics.

I know for a fact that UBC looks really favorably on the IB. Some other schools don't say it. Think about it, if you were an admissions officer, and were tasked with finding the brightest students, how can you ignore the IB?
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of scribbles scribbles
I'd say if you plan on staying in Canada, don't take IB, especially if McGill is your first choice. McGill does not look at your IB score at all, which is really disappointing since your percentages will be lower than those of others in regular programs.

Still, IB is a great program that I think definitely prepares you for university. It's stressful and all, but it provides you with an academic experience that a regular school program just doesn't give you.
Was this helpful? Yes 0