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I'll be applying soon and would like some advice on where I should apply. I want to go into Life Sci/Bio-med(...etc) but not sure as to which university to choose. What 5 universities would you suggest?

Note: Range 80%-90%
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A photo of xXxUfacStorAxXx xXxUfacStorAxXx
If you want to go to med school choose a university that has good academics but also where you think you will do the best. With an 80-90% average, I'd say that the best university would be Queen's or U of T - St. George, but those probably aren't wise choices for a premed because of the competition.
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A photo of inthemaking inthemaking
That's what I went into undergrad for (life/biomed sci) and I applied to Queen's, U of T, Western, and Mac. I would recommend any of those schools for life/health/biomed sci programs.
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@inthemaking wrote
That's what I went into undergrad for (life/biomed sci) and I applied to Queen's, U of T, Western, and Mac. I would recommend any of those schools for life/health/biomed sci programs.



YA WESTERN!
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A photo of AnimeGamer31 AnimeGamer31
McGill(Really competitive), Queen's, Western, McMaster, Toronto.

I heard that U of T is difficult and complicated in the later years because they give you incredibly low marks, so I do not recommend U of T for your later years. Also, all universities provide similar material in their undergrad programs, so it doesn't really matter what you pick.
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Note you're putting your future in the hands of people you've never seen before

But.. Choose something you'll do well in, who cares about rank
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A photo of Timeless25 Timeless25

@Qq wrote
Note you're putting your future in the hands of people you've never seen before

But.. Choose something you'll do well in, who cares about rank




Couldn't have said it better...lol.
Yeah you will have to do some research and use the advice others to make a decision. Maybe contact some of the universities u r interested in and ask them bout the programs they have. Good luck :D
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A photo of RamyaB RamyaB
If you want to just get a Bachelor's Degree, than go to Universities like McMaster, U of T, McGill, or Queens. Also I heard Dalhousie in Halifax is pretty good. But if you want to pursue a masters or a PhD, than take it easy on the undergrad, go to a small or medium size university, get good marks, and then apply to big universities for higher degrees.
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Guelph is the best university in Canada no doubt about it ;)
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A photo of mamamia mamamia
http://v1.theglobeandmail.com/partners/free/cur_2010/cur_ezine2011.html

Its the Canadian University Report 2011- a ranking of Canadian universities based on student satisfaction. ( Keep in mind none of such reports are actually reliable. They just give us an Idea ...)

Read from page 47
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Apparently U of T is VERY competitive. But it is very well-known for its science programs, so it's up to you to decide if you think you can handle the stress. Good luck!
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I would say: (arranged in no particular order)
McGill
UofT
Queens
McMaster
Western
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A photo of 123abcuwo 123abcuwo
If you want to go to grad/med school, UofT is not the best choice for undergrad. Unless you're super smart, it's EXTREMELY hard to get a GPA high enough for med school. Go somewhere else where you'll have a much higher chance of getting a high GPA. I've heard that while it's pretty easy to get in, it's extremely hard to graduate & a lot of people get cut from the program each year (e.g. year 1 of their undergrad, year 2, year 3)...and they bell curve DOWN (which is kinda odd considering typically the class gets belled UP, not down)
That being said, Queen's, Mac, UWO, McGill (though I've heard McGill is just like UofT) are good choices.
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A photo of ghonchehd ghonchehd
i would think U of T
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A photo of littleroom littleroom
People exaggerate the horror stories circulating about UofT. Although it is difficult, it is not at all as bad as you'll hear on these forums. If you want to go to medical school, UofT might give you a tougher time in terms of your GPA (not meaning that it's impossible to get 3.7+, it's just hard), but it also provides lots of research opportunities. These sorts of opportunities will be a plus for medical school, and especially for graduate school. By the way, the requirements for medical school and graduate school are different. For medical school, it seems that you have to have a top-notch application throughout (someone can correct me here if they know more), but for graduate school, a low GPA won't be looked on too strictly if you've, say, published in your undergraduate years or have fantastic letters of recommendation.

By the way, only once have I heard about UofT bellcurving down. They're not out to get you. Also, getting good grades at UofT actually becomes easier as the years progress because class sizes drop dramatically and professors no longer have to keep the class's average at C+ (i.e. they're more lenient or understanding in their marking).

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Plus going to a more challenging school has it's benefits. Medical school isn't exactly "easy" so if you can achieve a high GPA at a harder university I think that would make medical school a little easier.
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@mamamia wrote
http://v1.theglobeandmail.com/partners/free/cur_2010/cur_ezine2011.html

Its the Canadian University Report 2011- a ranking of Canadian universities based on student satisfaction. ( Keep in mind none of such reports are actually reliable. They just give us an Idea ...)

Read from page 47



WOW, Western rocks those charts
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mcgill university - 18th in the world this year
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@Qq wrote
Note you're putting your future in the hands of people you've never seen before

But.. Choose something you'll do well in, who cares about rank


Best advice I've read in this topic. +1.



@littleroom wrote
People exaggerate the horror stories circulating about UofT. Although it is difficult, it is not at all as bad as you'll hear on these forums. If you want to go to medical school, UofT might give you a tougher time in terms of your GPA (not meaning that it's impossible to get 3.7+, it's just hard), but it also provides lots of research opportunities. These sorts of opportunities will be a plus for medical school, and especially for graduate school. By the way, the requirements for medical school and graduate school are different. For medical school, it seems that you have to have a top-notch application throughout (someone can correct me here if they know more), but for graduate school, a low GPA won't be looked on too strictly if you've, say, published in your undergraduate years or have fantastic letters of recommendation.

By the way, only once have I heard about UofT bellcurving down. They're not out to get you. Also, getting good grades at UofT actually becomes easier as the years progress because class sizes drop dramatically and professors no longer have to keep the class's average at C+ (i.e. they're more lenient or understanding in their marking).




Yes, they're exaggerated, but the essence of the stories are true. I've actually went to two schools (went to Mac, currently at UofT), and the changes were drastic. For one, there's no curve at Mac that the professors adhere to. They were able to give how many A's they wanted in any class, and the class averages aren't set. At UofT, they're usually set at a C+ for first-year, and about 10%-15% of the class are allowed A's. Any more than that, and the distribution gets skewed. And I would beg to differ about 'profs not trying to screw you'. Some do, especially those from the CHM and PHY departments. It's terrible to see class averages at 35-40% for some term tests.

However, don't let that deter you. If you're able to work hard, everything will fall into place. I do enjoy the breadth of courses at UofT; their science courses are so much more diverse than the ones at Mac. And the 299Y Research Opportunity courses are a fantastic way for students to dip their feet into research. However, if you want it 'easier,' go to another school besides UofT. Chances are, the social atmosphere is more engaging, and for the same amount of work you put into UofT, you'll probably do better at other schools.

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@biosci wrote
Plus going to a more challenging school has it's benefits. Medical school isn't exactly "easy" so if you can achieve a high GPA at a harder university I think that would make medical school a little easier.


False. Don't think schools will give you an advantage just because you went to a 'difficult' undergraduate school. The teaching methodologies are completely different for undergrad vs. medical schools. If you can get into medical school, all, if not most, end up doing quite well as only the best of the best are chosen.
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A photo of rebecca-afford rebecca-afford
I agree with not listening to other people about choosing a university. Have you thought of going somewhere that isn't in ontario? that's all i've heard thats been thrown around in this conversation. for sure look into the mcleans magazine rankings. with your averages, maybe look into a medium sized university. i don't think the teaching quality will be anything less spectacular or detrimental to your future plans.
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If you are thinking of going into a Med school after you finish your undergrad, then DO NOT go to UTSG.
Go to an easier university, get good grades during your 4 years there, then apply to UofT for grad. Afterall, UofT life sci is famous for their GRADUATE studies and RESEARCH, NOT undergrad programs. They simply do not give a sh!t if you fail or drop out before graduating.

And btw, my friend in 4th year life sci told me that UofT rarely take back their own life sci graduates for med school. So there you go.
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A photo of bobbyn4360 bobbyn4360
Does anyone know how good the University of Alberta's medical program is?
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@bobbyn4360 wrote
Does anyone know how good the University of Alberta's medical program is?



Or possibly Manitoba? I would prefer to stay close to family - especially for first year.

What happens if I go into uni thinking that i'll be going into med and later on figure out that that's not my calling? is it going to take me even longer to switch to whatever the other thing is?
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A photo of Atelophobia Atelophobia
Well these are the top ones in canada for life sci/medicine...

1. UofT
2. UBC
3. McGill
4. MAC
5. University of Alberta

Source:
http://www.topuniversities.com/university-rankings/world-university-rankings/2010/subject-rankings/life-science-biomedicine
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