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U of T ECE Question

A photo of TheSingularity TheSingularity
I have always been interested in becoming a electric engineer, or a computer hardware engineer. I am also interested in semiconductor research. I will most definitely wish to pursue a graduate degree in electrical or computer engineering. Having been been accepted into engineering Science @ U OF T, I don't know if it is the best option for ECE. Are there any advantages to doing ENG SCI ECE or core 8 ece, I dont care about difficulty!!!.

I just want to know what pros and cons are in terms of industry and academia. TY.
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A photo of inyoface inyoface
Engsci curriculum includes everything ranging from biology to aerospace. The advantage is that you will know (almost) everything everyone else learns up to 2nd year. Of course, this also makes the program more challenging.
A con of engsci is that you don't get as much student-professor interactions, because engsci does not have its own department - its profs are those from other departments. In terms of job opportunities, if you have the grades and the experience, you will get a job regardless of what you are in. There are very few cases where a company looking to hire for an electrical engineering position chooses an electrical engineer over an engsci.
A pro of engsci is that it prepares you more towards grad school in that its curriculum is very theory intensive.

Having been in and done well in both programs, I think Engsci is a good experience to have, but it is easier to make academic/industry connections (read: knowing profs better, more time with job offers) in ECE. That said, you can always transfer out of Engsci into ECE after first year. I think first year Engsci was a very good experience, it really teaches (read: forces) you to time manage and form good study habits.

Something to note is that ECE offers a semiconductor specialization in 3rd & 4th year. Engsci has a more general specialization in its Physics option.
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A photo of TheSingularity TheSingularity
So, it would be easier to get research done in ece, and get some academic and industry connections. What exactly is engsci good for?

Do grad schools in US prefer engsci's?
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A photo of inyoface inyoface
Well as stated in my first post, engsci teaches you how to time manage, which is the most important thing to take away from university. You will also have fundamental understandings of a variety of subjects that covers most of the core 8 programs. I can't comment on the preference of grad school admission committees, US or otherwise. Also, you will most likely not be doing research in undergrad. Although it is easier to connect with professors as ECE's, the engsci program prepares you more for gradschool.
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A photo of TheSingularity TheSingularity
Do people generally recommend attending firt year engsci then switching to ece.
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A photo of inyoface inyoface

@TheSingularity wrote
Do people generally recommend attending firt year engsci then switching to ece.


Hahaha I don't think so! That is what I've done and I don't regret any of it. I think it was a great learning experience and I made a lot of good friends along the way. One of the main complaints from people that transfer (not drop) out of engsci is that you learn way too much. But this isn't necessarily a bad thing, especially when you don't know what you want to do or should do. For example, I went in thinking I'd do the energy option, but have since decided to do energy systems and controls systems in ECE because it doesn't deal with policies as much and is focused on electrical energy (which is what I'm interested in). All in all, if you work hard and manage your time well, you will do well in either program. I can't stress enough the importance of time management in university, but you will surely see this after you come here.

Regardless, both programs are excellent and you won't go wrong with either. If you indeed come to UofT for ECE or Engsci, I'd be happy to answer any questions you may have in detail.
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A photo of TheSingularity TheSingularity
TY for your help inyoface, I am going to engsci, and if I dont like it or I think ECE or another core8 option is better for me, I will be sure to switch.
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A photo of inyoface inyoface
Glad to hear it!
The areas you mentioned are actually UofT's strong point, especially computer hardware. There are some brilliant professors here in that area. I think you will enjoy it quite a bit, especially after you specialize and start taking hardware courses.
Good luck!
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A photo of TheSingularity TheSingularity
I got a question though, does U of T grad school pick an ece engsci with say 3.5 gpa over Electrical Engineer with 3.7 gpa for grad school?
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A photo of inyoface inyoface
You'll have to understand that you're asking a question that nobody can answer. I can only suspect that the admissions committee would look at other qualifications.
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