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Undergrad Calender/Timetable for Math/CA

A photo of RyanJones123 RyanJones123
The undergraduate calender for Math/CA doesn't seem to be working.

Does anybody know where I can find a list of courses I'll be taking each term in the Math/CA program?

Thanks!
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A photo of g93 g93
http://ugradcalendar.uwaterloo.ca/page/MATH-Math-or-Chartered-Accountancy-Co-op-Requiremt
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A photo of IanSharer IanSharer

@g93 wrote
http://ugradcalendar.uwaterloo.ca/page/MATH-Math-or-Chartered-Accountancy-Co-op-Requiremt



What on earth do some of those math courses have to do with accounting >.>

I swear Waterloo just likes to create fancy programs with the name "Chartered Accountant" in it to attract ambitious asians from across the world.

inb4 my sig
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A photo of immaculatedx immaculatedx
This is Math/CA not AFM, you get a Bmath ... ofc there are gonna be some math courses not related to accounting, if one wanted only accounting related courses, they would choose AFM ....
Not defending Math/CA as a great/excellent program or anything though (I'm probably not going).
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A photo of IanSharer IanSharer

@immaculatedx wrote
This is Math/CA not AFM, you get a Bmath ... ofc there are gonna be some math courses not related to accounting, if one wanted only accounting related courses, they would choose AFM ....
Not defending Math/CA as a great/excellent program or anything though (I'm probably not going).



That's what I'm questioning: What's the point of the program? What practical use will accounting knowledge have with a math degree (or vise-versa)?

Seems like such an odd combination the more I think about it, yet it's one of the most competitive programs to get into. Am I missing something or is Waterloo just really good at marketing themselves to naive high schoolers?
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A photo of g93 g93

@IanSharer wrote

@immaculatedx wrote
This is Math/CA not AFM, you get a Bmath ... ofc there are gonna be some math courses not related to accounting, if one wanted only accounting related courses, they would choose AFM ....
Not defending Math/CA as a great/excellent program or anything though (I'm probably not going).



That's what I'm questioning: What's the point of the program? What practical use will accounting knowledge have with a math degree (or vise-versa)?

Seems like such an odd combination the more I think about it, yet it's one of the most competitive programs to get into. Am I missing something or is Waterloo just really good at marketing themselves to naive high schoolers?


The one I find stranger is Biotech/CA... when I first saw that I was like WTF!?
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A photo of IanSharer IanSharer

@g93 wrote

@IanSharer wrote

@immaculatedx wrote
This is Math/CA not AFM, you get a Bmath ... ofc there are gonna be some math courses not related to accounting, if one wanted only accounting related courses, they would choose AFM ....
Not defending Math/CA as a great/excellent program or anything though (I'm probably not going).



That's what I'm questioning: What's the point of the program? What practical use will accounting knowledge have with a math degree (or vise-versa)?

Seems like such an odd combination the more I think about it, yet it's one of the most competitive programs to get into. Am I missing something or is Waterloo just really good at marketing themselves to naive high schoolers?


The one I find stranger is Biotech/CA... when I first saw that I was like WTF!?



That I can actually understand. They have different backgrounds and can potentially attract those (usually asian) kids that want to have med school and accounting options open.

However, Math and Accounting... I doubt too many people are split between actsci and accounting. I also highly doubt those in the program have anything else (besides accounting) in mind anyway.
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A photo of immaculatedx immaculatedx
Math/CA has existed for a while now, definitely the oldest program for a math and business double background concentration. The double degree directors and other important people in fostering the new math/cs + business programs are from Math/CA.

It has less to do with the content but more so of the fact that the AFM program is rather one dimensional for getting ands staying a CA. The education and math could potentially open many MANY doors in the future for Math/CA'ers.

I think its a beautiful combination depending on the person, just imo.
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A photo of IanSharer IanSharer

@immaculatedx wrote
Math/CA has existed for a while now, definitely the oldest program for a math and business double background concentration. The double degree directors and other important people in fostering the new math/cs + business programs are from Math/CA.

It has less to do with the content but more so of the fact that the AFM program is rather one dimensional for getting ands staying a CA. The education and math could potentially open many MANY doors in the future for Math/CA'ers.

I think its a beautiful combination depending on the person, just imo.



What opportunities would a math degree provide for accountants? I can understand math and business or even math and finance, but math and accounting?

I'm looking at its history and level of competitiveness, but can't seem to understand why...
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A photo of immaculatedx immaculatedx
I think you're views are a little narrow-minded. People often forget the purpose of higher-order education. Do you really think that most of the DD's who combine finance and math are going to be doing calculus in algebra in their careers? No. Its the thinking power they harnessed from studying mathematics that allows them to do their jobs.

This is quoted from wsj - "There is a drastic difference between "a trade or employable vocation" and an education. You blur the two. And there is nothing wrong with either, they just serve different purposes."

I think if one had the ability for Math/CA, it'd definitely be advantageous over AFM because of the enrichment one gained from the higher-order thinking, the problem solving skills ... that can all be applied to the real world.

Education has very little to do actually especially for higher-order subjects in its applications but rather its the benefits and developments it provides to people that is applicable and useful. Many of the largest CEOs and important people on Wall Street and finance have engineering backgrounds - coincidence? I dont think so.

Now I got a little off-track but I think you should get my drift now.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@immaculatedx wrote
I think you're views are a little narrow-minded. People often forget the purpose of higher-order education. Do you really think that most of the DD's who combine finance and math are going to be doing calculus in algebra in their careers? No. Its the thinking power they harnessed from studying mathematics that allows them to do their jobs.

This is quoted from wsj - "There is a drastic difference between "a trade or employable vocation" and an education. You blur the two. And there is nothing wrong with either, they just serve different purposes."

I think if one had the ability for Math/CA, it'd definitely be advantageous over AFM because of the enrichment one gained from the higher-order thinking, the problem solving skills ... that can all be applied to the real world.

Education has very little to do actually especially for higher-order subjects in its applications but rather its the benefits and developments it provides to people that is applicable and useful. Many of the largest CEOs and important people on Wall Street and finance have engineering backgrounds - coincidence? I dont think so.

Now I got a little off-track but I think you should get my drift now.



+1

Not to mention if you decide you don't like accounting and wish to pursue something else...you have a math degree which allows you to do something else or pursue a masters in another math related field.
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A photo of g93 g93

@immaculatedx wrote
I think you're views are a little narrow-minded. People often forget the purpose of higher-order education. Do you really think that most of the DD's who combine finance and math are going to be doing calculus in algebra in their careers? No. Its the thinking power they harnessed from studying mathematics that allows them to do their jobs.

This is quoted from wsj - "There is a drastic difference between "a trade or employable vocation" and an education. You blur the two. And there is nothing wrong with either, they just serve different purposes."

I think if one had the ability for Math/CA, it'd definitely be advantageous over AFM because of the enrichment one gained from the higher-order thinking, the problem solving skills ... that can all be applied to the real world.

Education has very little to do actually especially for higher-order subjects in its applications but rather its the benefits and developments it provides to people that is applicable and useful. Many of the largest CEOs and important people on Wall Street and finance have engineering backgrounds - coincidence? I dont think so.

Now I got a little off-track but I think you should get my drift now.


With an average like yours, I'm hpoing your poor spelling/grammar is only because you are writing on a computer.
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A photo of immaculatedx immaculatedx

@g93 wrote

@immaculatedx wrote
I think you're views are a little narrow-minded. People often forget the purpose of higher-order education. Do you really think that most of the DD's who combine finance and math are going to be doing calculus in algebra in their careers? No. Its the thinking power they harnessed from studying mathematics that allows them to do their jobs.

This is quoted from wsj - "There is a drastic difference between "a trade or employable vocation" and an education. You blur the two. And there is nothing wrong with either, they just serve different purposes."

I think if one had the ability for Math/CA, it'd definitely be advantageous over AFM because of the enrichment one gained from the higher-order thinking, the problem solving skills ... that can all be applied to the real world.

Education has very little to do actually especially for higher-order subjects in its applications but rather its the benefits and developments it provides to people that is applicable and useful. Many of the largest CEOs and important people on Wall Street and finance have engineering backgrounds - coincidence? I dont think so.

Now I got a little off-track but I think you should get my drift now.


With an average like yours, I'm hpoing your poor spelling/grammar is only because you are writing on a computer.



The ideas are little incoherent and jumbled ... but I don't see (that many) spelling/grammar mistakes :\
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A photo of IanSharer IanSharer

@immaculatedx wrote
I think you're views are a little narrow-minded. People often forget the purpose of higher-order education. Do you really think that most of the DD's who combine finance and math are going to be doing calculus in algebra in their careers? No. Its the thinking power they harnessed from studying mathematics that allows them to do their jobs.

This is quoted from wsj - "There is a drastic difference between "a trade or employable vocation" and an education. You blur the two. And there is nothing wrong with either, they just serve different purposes."

I think if one had the ability for Math/CA, it'd definitely be advantageous over AFM because of the enrichment one gained from the higher-order thinking, the problem solving skills ... that can all be applied to the real world.

Education has very little to do actually especially for higher-order subjects in its applications but rather its the benefits and developments it provides to people that is applicable and useful. Many of the largest CEOs and important people on Wall Street and finance have engineering backgrounds - coincidence? I dont think so.

Now I got a little off-track but I think you should get my drift now.



I understand what you mean, and if that's really the reason most people are attracted to the program then good for them. But from talking to other people who've also applied to it, it just seems like they're only interested in the accounting aspect and think the competitiveness of it means it's a good program. I agree with your other statement: It can definitely be a great combination depending on the person, though the Math and Business double degree beats this by a long shot in that regard (yet it's not nearly as competitive to get into, which just reinforces my earlier statement).


@g93 wrote
With an average like yours, I'm hpoing your poor spelling/grammar is only because you are writing on a computer.



I'm hoping that was just a typo.
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A photo of immaculatedx immaculatedx

@IanSharer wrote

@immaculatedx wrote
I think you're views are a little narrow-minded. People often forget the purpose of higher-order education. Do you really think that most of the DD's who combine finance and math are going to be doing calculus in algebra in their careers? No. Its the thinking power they harnessed from studying mathematics that allows them to do their jobs.

This is quoted from wsj - "There is a drastic difference between "a trade or employable vocation" and an education. You blur the two. And there is nothing wrong with either, they just serve different purposes."

I think if one had the ability for Math/CA, it'd definitely be advantageous over AFM because of the enrichment one gained from the higher-order thinking, the problem solving skills ... that can all be applied to the real world.

Education has very little to do actually especially for higher-order subjects in its applications but rather its the benefits and developments it provides to people that is applicable and useful. Many of the largest CEOs and important people on Wall Street and finance have engineering backgrounds - coincidence? I dont think so.

Now I got a little off-track but I think you should get my drift now.



I understand what you mean, and if that's really the reason most people are attracted to the program then good for them. But from talking to other people who've also applied to it, it just seems like they're only interested in the accounting aspect and think the competitiveness of it means it's a good program. I agree with your other statement: It can definitely be a great combination depending on the person, though the Math and Business double degree beats this by a long shot in that regard (yet it's not nearly as competitive to get into, which just reinforces my earlier statement).


@g93 wrote
With an average like yours, I'm hpoing your poor spelling/grammar is only because you are writing on a computer.



I'm hoping that was just a typo.



Firstly, ahahahhahahahhaha hoping he doesn't take too much offense to that.

Your points make a lot of sense based on the pure "usefulness" of the combination. One of the main reasons that I mentioned is that relative existences of the program. Math/CA has been around for a while and people know about it. The first graduating class from MathDD was 2010 and there hasn't even been a graduating class yet for FARM, CFM or CsDD (I may be wrong). If more people want a program, then admissions is obviously the more competitive it is to get in.

Overall, I agree that DD is better and that's why I'm going : )
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A photo of g93 g93

@immaculatedx wrote

@g93 wrote

@immaculatedx wrote
I think you're views are a little narrow-minded. People often forget the purpose of higher-order education. Do you really think that most of the DD's who combine finance and math are going to be doing calculus in algebra in their careers? No. Its the thinking power they harnessed from studying mathematics that allows them to do their jobs.

This is quoted from wsj - "There is a drastic difference between "a trade or employable vocation" and an education. You blur the two. And there is nothing wrong with either, they just serve different purposes."

I think if one had the ability for Math/CA, it'd definitely be advantageous over AFM because of the enrichment one gained from the higher-order thinking, the problem solving skills ... that can all be applied to the real world.

Education has very little to do actually especially for higher-order subjects in its applications but rather its the benefits and developments it provides to people that is applicable and useful. Many of the largest CEOs and important people on Wall Street and finance have engineering backgrounds - coincidence? I dont think so.

Now I got a little off-track but I think you should get my drift now.


With an average like yours, I'm hpoing your poor spelling/grammar is only because you are writing on a computer.



The ideas are little incoherent and jumbled ... but I don't see (that many) spelling/grammar mistakes :\


First of all, ha ha ha I put o after p in hoping.

Let's see: you're instead of your

its instead of it's

largest CEOs? so they're fat?

calculus in algebra?

just at first glance, I've noticed it in other posts. If u write like this that's fine but if u r writng in full sentences, then I would think that grammar and spelling would be near flawless, except for a few typos.
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A photo of immaculatedx immaculatedx

@g93 wrote

@immaculatedx wrote

@g93 wrote

@immaculatedx wrote
I think you're views are a little narrow-minded. People often forget the purpose of higher-order education. Do you really think that most of the DD's who combine finance and math are going to be doing calculus in algebra in their careers? No. Its the thinking power they harnessed from studying mathematics that allows them to do their jobs.

This is quoted from wsj - "There is a drastic difference between "a trade or employable vocation" and an education. You blur the two. And there is nothing wrong with either, they just serve different purposes."

I think if one had the ability for Math/CA, it'd definitely be advantageous over AFM because of the enrichment one gained from the higher-order thinking, the problem solving skills ... that can all be applied to the real world.

Education has very little to do actually especially for higher-order subjects in its applications but rather its the benefits and developments it provides to people that is applicable and useful. Many of the largest CEOs and important people on Wall Street and finance have engineering backgrounds - coincidence? I dont think so.

Now I got a little off-track but I think you should get my drift now.


With an average like yours, I'm hpoing your poor spelling/grammar is only because you are writing on a computer.



The ideas are little incoherent and jumbled ... but I don't see (that many) spelling/grammar mistakes :\


First of all, ha ha ha I put o after p in hoping.

Let's see: you're instead of your

its instead of it's

largest CEOs? so they're fat?

calculus in algebra?

just at first glance, I've noticed it in other posts. If u write like this that's fine but if u r writng in full sentences, then I would think that grammar and spelling would be near flawless, except for a few typos.



Okay, the first two things should be w/e since its a forum. Why can't CEO's be large? ... and I put in instead of and sorry : (

but in all seriousness, no need to be a grammar nazi - I like to type in full sentences especially if I'm explaining something... but that doesn't I'm typing more carefully compared to when I typz lik dis w/msn lang. Point is just because I use periods, doesn't mean I have to give you any better spelling/grammar than the next guy on this forum o_O

no disrespect or anything, just sayin`
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A photo of g93 g93
My point was that you use contractions and generally attempt to have proper spelling and grammar. If u r typing like this or w e u r not really concerned at all with spelling and grammar. Once you use sentences and full words, you begin using fairly proper spelling and grammar.

If you put can't instead of cant, you would put it's instead of its.

And large CEOs would imply that the CEOs themselves are large, not that the companies that they are executives at are large.

Just something I noticed. w/e
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