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Undergraduate Business Ranking

A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
I got this from a thread on another forum site and was wondering if most people on studentawards would agree with this persons ranking???
***these are not my thoughts***


1) The Ivey School of Business, for undergraduates and graduates, is literally known to train their students to be future executives. Ivey’s HBA program is the most selective with their admissions process as only a student with a 3.5+ GPA demonstrating strong leadership and extra-curricular involvement can get you into the 3rd yr direct-entry HBA program. The program accommodates a total of 450 undergraduates, the fewest number of students than any business school. Case study emphasis + Leadership & mentorship programs + impressive advisory board uniquely set Ivey apart from all other schools. Throw in the intangibles such as the beauty of the campus, the school spirit and the girls make this school a "must" on any guy’s shortlist. Only drawback: $19 G tuition/year makes it BY FAR the most expensive B-program in the nation.

2) Schulich School of Business - Instant brand recognition sets this school apart from all others. When you talk about Schulich, you talk about their international outreach, world-class faculty, excellent co-op program and strong alumni support and networking. Lately, however, the recent strike at York is sure to negatively impact the reputation of the BBA program. The diversity in Schulich is perhaps the most defining quality for the sheer number of international students that they recruit.

Queen`s School of Business - This is their baby, their flagship program. Second to Ivey, they admit the best (91% HS avg highest). QSB does a great job in getting their students involved outside of the classroom: plenty of student clubs & organizations and leadership conferences. Their business career centre at Goodes Hall is exceptional and absolutely worth every penny spent from your tuition. The reason why I can’t rank them ahead of York is because they lack the diversity within their student body to be the best and the fact that they don't offer co-op or summer courses to those that want some flexibility to stay ahead.

4) Laurier’s School of Business & Economics may not be the most selective business programs out there, but the overall satisfaction that a student can get is among the very top. Laurier takes fourth as their overall quality of teaching (great student-teacher interaction given the large class sizes in the first 2 years) is exceptional along with having a solid reputation of preparing their students for a career: stock market simulations, case studies, a co-op program that is second to none (50% of BBA students are in co-op), and a whopping 96% rate of employment for all students (the highest in Canada) after 3 months of graduation.

Tie-5) Sauder School of Business: Very competitive to get in as a 1st yr BCom student (84% HS avg cut off) better to apply as a transfer student after your first year. Not many know this, but research-wise Sauder is indisputably among the top 3 in the country with the highest rate of PhD professors (92%) and highest Federal grants than any other business schools. Their B-school also offers so many unique and different avenues for students to pursue such as real estate or the transportation & logistics option. If you're hoping to get a PhD or a DBA and teach one day, you should consider the Commerce Scholars program, which brings the best and the brightest of students together to collaborate with professors in their research. Those hoping to go into finance can get an opportunity to manage a $2 million endowment fund with the help of UBC Portfolio Management Foundation (PMF) mentors - this is the kind of hands-on learning that would help you get an edge. Also, recruitment is pretty strong particularly in Asia and Europe.

Tie-5) When you think McGill - you think of it being the best university in Canada, but the sad truth is that their business program isn't really a first-tier choice as much as it is in arts & sciences. The Desautels Faculty of Management is what it says it is - a faculty and not a "school". McGill doesn't really offer a whole lot of choices or challenges for students to venture into, and there really isn't anything within the BCom program that uniquely sets the school apart compared to others. The one problem that I have with Desautels is that they have 2571 undergraduate students enrolled more than Sauder or Rotman, and one of the key factors of having a stimulating learning environment is to have a low class size. The only school that I know that can pull off that off is Laurier. Also an influx of students migrating to BCom from the Engineering and Sciences practically makes the program a second-rate. Despite my negative critique, I would still think that the strengths of the school itself would make McGill Commerce a good choice to consider. The overall living experience at McGill tramples UBC as it isn’t really a commuter school compared to UBC. I like Desautels’s diversity (multiculturalism in the campus), which isn`t something that Sauder can match. The only reason of having McGill ranked higher than Sauder specifically in Commerce is the fact that their students statistically fare better in getting both a higher starting salary and a higher rate of employment after graduation.

7) The Rotman School of Management (or Rotman Commerce) is a freakin disappointing seventh -- don't get me wrong, they clearly have one of the best MBA programs in the country, but the quality of teaching at the undergraduate level is reputedly poor. Also, the fact that their BCom graduates are said to have the worst time finding jobs on Bay St. is unacceptable. Another turnoff is the fact that students tackle a super-heavy course load with little or no room for extra-curricular activities. So unless you are graduating within the top 15%, you might have some reason to worry.
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A photo of g93 g93
I wouldn't say that this ranking is wrong or anything. Depending on the person the rankings can vary a lot. Most of these schools are pretty close.

I would personally switch Queen's and Schulich, and place Mcgill above Sauder.
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Unless you do Engineering + Ivey or some sort of Science + Ivey, I don't see how it can be ranked ahead of Queen's (this is IMO).

I would say: Queen's, Ivey, Schulich/Laurier, McGill, Sauder, Rotman or something like that.
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A photo of asian123 asian123
Pretty useful information......

But I think that McGill should be rated higher than Laurier....

If you look at the starting salaries as well as the intl' rep.
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@asian123 wrote
Pretty useful information......

But I think that McGill should be rated higher than Laurier....

If you look at the starting salaries as well as the intl' rep.


Laurier doesn't publish starting salaries. The only ones that do are QIMS. Your point is invalid.

But this is why rankings aren't universal: if one is planning to work internationally McGill would be one of the best schools for them. When you add in campus and environment and stuff you get quite different rankings.
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A photo of asian123 asian123
My brother goes to Laurier, and he says that its around 45000.....



Why dont they publish starting salaries though???
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@johnnycanuck wrote
I would say: Queen's, Ivey, Schulich/Laurier, McGill, Sauder, Rotman or something like that.


+ 1

But I think Ivey and Queen's can easily be switched.

Internationally I'd say McGill would be Top 3
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@asian123 wrote
My brother goes to Laurier, and he says that its around 45000.....



Why dont they publish starting salaries though???


That is the approx. average, and considering that it is the largest undergrad business program in Canada, that is pretty good. McGill is only slightly on 45k (not including bonuses).

Most schools don't. I'm assuming it's a lot of work. With a program as big as Laurier's I'm sure it would be difficult, and it is a voluntary survey.
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A photo of IanSharer IanSharer

1) The Ivey School of Business, for undergraduates and graduates, is literally known to train their students to be future executives. Ivey’s HBA program is the most selective with their admissions process as only a student with a 3.5+ GPA demonstrating strong leadership and extra-curricular involvement can get you into the 3rd yr direct-entry HBA program. The program accommodates a total of 450 undergraduates, the fewest number of students than any business school. Case study emphasis + Leadership & mentorship programs + impressive advisory board uniquely set Ivey apart from all other schools. Throw in the intangibles such as the beauty of the campus, the school spirit and the girls make this school a "must" on any guy’s shortlist. Only drawback: $19 G tuition/year makes it BY FAR the most expensive B-program in the nation.



Nothing to disagree with here.


2) Schulich School of Business - Instant brand recognition sets this school apart from all others. When you talk about Schulich, you talk about their international outreach, world-class faculty, excellent co-op program and strong alumni support and networking. Lately, however, the recent strike at York is sure to negatively impact the reputation of the BBA program. The diversity in Schulich is perhaps the most defining quality for the sheer number of international students that they recruit.



A couple of things:

1) There's no co-op
2) Ivey and Queen's alumni is much, much, MUCH stronger



Queen`s School of Business - This is their baby, their flagship program. Second to Ivey, they admit the best (91% HS avg highest). QSB does a great job in getting their students involved outside of the classroom: plenty of student clubs & organizations and leadership conferences. Their business career centre at Goodes Hall is exceptional and absolutely worth every penny spent from your tuition. The reason why I can’t rank them ahead of York is because they lack the diversity within their student body to be the best and the fact that they don't offer co-op or summer courses to those that want some flexibility to stay ahead.



What does diversity have to do with a business program? I don't have the numbers, but I'm pretty sure they have more international students than Schulich. Also, none of the above schools have co-op. Finally, Queen's summer employment numbers are much higher than Schulich.


4) Laurier’s School of Business & Economics may not be the most selective business programs out there, but the overall satisfaction that a student can get is among the very top. Laurier takes fourth as their overall quality of teaching (great student-teacher interaction given the large class sizes in the first 2 years) is exceptional along with having a solid reputation of preparing their students for a career: stock market simulations, case studies, a co-op program that is second to none (50% of BBA students are in co-op), and a whopping 96% rate of employment for all students (the highest in Canada) after 3 months of graduation.



I highly doubt 50% are in co-op (pretty sure it was like 35%?) and I doubt they have the highest employment rate (unless it includes employment in general and not in career-worthy jobs).


Tie-5) Sauder School of Business: Very competitive to get in as a 1st yr BCom student (84% HS avg cut off) better to apply as a transfer student after your first year. Not many know this, but research-wise Sauder is indisputably among the top 3 in the country with the highest rate of PhD professors (92%) and highest Federal grants than any other business schools. Their B-school also offers so many unique and different avenues for students to pursue such as real estate or the transportation & logistics option. If you're hoping to get a PhD or a DBA and teach one day, you should consider the Commerce Scholars program, which brings the best and the brightest of students together to collaborate with professors in their research. Those hoping to go into finance can get an opportunity to manage a $2 million endowment fund with the help of UBC Portfolio Management Foundation (PMF) mentors - this is the kind of hands-on learning that would help you get an edge. Also, recruitment is pretty strong particularly in Asia and Europe.



Don't know much about Sauder.


Tie-5) When you think McGill - you think of it being the best university in Canada, but the sad truth is that their business program isn't really a first-tier choice as much as it is in arts & sciences. The Desautels Faculty of Management is what it says it is - a faculty and not a "school". McGill doesn't really offer a whole lot of choices or challenges for students to venture into, and there really isn't anything within the BCom program that uniquely sets the school apart compared to others. The one problem that I have with Desautels is that they have 2571 undergraduate students enrolled more than Sauder or Rotman, and one of the key factors of having a stimulating learning environment is to have a low class size. The only school that I know that can pull off that off is Laurier. Also an influx of students migrating to BCom from the Engineering and Sciences practically makes the program a second-rate. Despite my negative critique, I would still think that the strengths of the school itself would make McGill Commerce a good choice to consider. The overall living experience at McGill tramples UBC as it isn’t really a commuter school compared to UBC. I like Desautels’s diversity (multiculturalism in the campus), which isn`t something that Sauder can match. The only reason of having McGill ranked higher than Sauder specifically in Commerce is the fact that their students statistically fare better in getting both a higher starting salary and a higher rate of employment after graduation.



Degrading McGill because it doesn't have "school" in its name..?


7) The Rotman School of Management (or Rotman Commerce) is a freakin disappointing seventh -- don't get me wrong, they clearly have one of the best MBA programs in the country, but the quality of teaching at the undergraduate level is reputedly poor. Also, the fact that their BCom graduates are said to have the worst time finding jobs on Bay St. is unacceptable. Another turnoff is the fact that students tackle a super-heavy course load with little or no room for extra-curricular activities. So unless you are graduating within the top 15%, you might have some reason to worry.



Eh, I don't know too much about Rotman.

I have a good feeling whoever wrote this wrote it out of their ass without any substantial backings.

Rankings are pointless without a certain criteria (ie. It's different when looking toward finance, accounting, co-op, cost, environment, international appeal, etc...).
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A photo of immaculatedx immaculatedx
Decent post but this topic is really subjective hence why there are no official rankings.

And for someone who didn't even apply to all the programs mentioned, it's hard to find full credibility :P

(Not saying you don't your stuff - I like the Ivey post, hope you'll be heading there :D )
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@immaculatedx wrote
Decent post but this topic is really subjective hence why there are no official rankings.

And for someone who didn't even apply to all the programs mentioned, it's hard to find full credibility :P

(Not saying you don't your stuff - I like the Ivey post, hope you'll be heading there :D )



I tried to make it as clear as possible that I didn't write this.
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A photo of noxx98 noxx98
Mine:

Tier 1:
Queens, Ivey, Schulich
Tier 2:
Double Degree, McGill
Tier 3:
WLU, Rotman, Sauder
Tier 4:
Mac, Brock (for accounting only)
Tier 5:
Everyone Else.

I feel doing standard rankings of 1, 2... x, is useless since each school has its own advantages, and disadvantages. If you want to go international McGill would be a good bet. If you want IB, Ivey is the best, you want a strong math/analytical basis, then DD is probably the best. Doing standard rankings is just asking for arguements, where as just about everyone will agree Queens, Ivey, and Schulich are top 3, or top 4.
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A photo of GoBarca GoBarca

@dxb2ont wrote
I like Desautels’s diversity (multiculturalism in the campus), which isn`t something that Sauder can match.



Well, sauder has A LOT OF international students. It is VERY diverse !!



@dxb2ont wrote
the quality of teaching at the undergraduate level is reputedly poor.Another turnoff is the fact that students tackle a super-heavy course load with little or no room for extra-curricular activities.



I have talked with several Rotman students, the course load is actually not SUPER-HEAVY, and from what i heard some prof who teaches the undergrad commerce program also teaches MBA. In my opinion, these bschools are actually not that different in terms of the quality of education, im sure rotman has one of the best quality in the country. But rotman's career centre ... not so much.
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A photo of immaculatedx immaculatedx

@dxb2ont wrote

@immaculatedx wrote
Decent post but this topic is really subjective hence why there are no official rankings.

And for someone who didn't even apply to all the programs mentioned, it's hard to find full credibility :P

(Not saying you don't your stuff - I like the Ivey post, hope you'll be heading there :D )



I tried to make it as clear as possible that I didn't write this.



Oh sorry, my bad - didn't read the beginning
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@immaculatedx wrote

@dxb2ont wrote

@immaculatedx wrote
Decent post but this topic is really subjective hence why there are no official rankings.

And for someone who didn't even apply to all the programs mentioned, it's hard to find full credibility :P

(Not saying you don't your stuff - I like the Ivey post, hope you'll be heading there :D )



I tried to make it as clear as possible that I didn't write this.



Oh sorry, my bad - didn't read the beginning



No problem! I see you've been accepted to a fine range of programs. Is Ivey your First choice?
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A photo of immaculatedx immaculatedx

@dxb2ont wrote

@immaculatedx wrote

@dxb2ont wrote

@immaculatedx wrote
Decent post but this topic is really subjective hence why there are no official rankings.

And for someone who didn't even apply to all the programs mentioned, it's hard to find full credibility :P

(Not saying you don't your stuff - I like the Ivey post, hope you'll be heading there :D )



I tried to make it as clear as possible that I didn't write this.



Oh sorry, my bad - didn't read the beginning



No problem! I see you've been accepted to a fine range of programs. Is Ivey your First choice?



I've worshiped Waterloo for the 1.5 years but I had an all-of-a-sudden change of heart (Kind of last minute) and I think I'm set on Western now, yes.

You too?
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A photo of waazup waazup

@noxx98 wrote
Mine:

Tier 1:
Queens, Ivey, Schulich
Tier 2:
Double Degree, McGill
Tier 3:
WLU, Rotman, Sauder
Tier 4:
Mac, Brock (for accounting only)
Tier 5:
Everyone Else.

I feel doing standard rankings of 1, 2... x, is useless since each school has its own advantages, and disadvantages. If you want to go international McGill would be a good bet. If you want IB, Ivey is the best, you want a strong math/analytical basis, then DD is probably the best. Doing standard rankings is just asking for arguements, where as just about everyone will agree Queens, Ivey, and Schulich are top 3, or top 4.



+100000000 !!
This is EXACTLY how I rank them.

To the OP, you have done a great job of ranking them, of course we have subjective answers but the list is pretty accurate. I think as long as Queen's,Ivey and Schulich are in the top 3, or top 5 for that matter (Don't want to dissapoint anyone), it's accurate.
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A photo of goldmansachs goldmansachs
You can't just rank them like that. Each person has different preferences... like some people don't like Ivey's 2+2.. so they think Queen's should be ranked first. Some people want to go into accounting and they see that Schulich/Waterloo is their best bet so they rank them above Ivey and Queen's.

Just like that..

Personally I rank McGill above all of these schools because of McGill's reputation outside of Canada, it's a party university, big city, opportunity to learn french and become billingual and the tuition is 6K! And besides that... I want to get my MBA at an U.S. school so McGill has a pretty good reputation there and the program itself isn't THAT challenging so I might be able to get a good GPA.

Again these are my personal preferences.
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A photo of g93 g93

@goldmansachs wrote
You can't just rank them like that. Each person has different preferences... like some people don't like Ivey's 2+2.. so they think Queen's should be ranked first. Some people want to go into accounting and they see that Schulich/Waterloo is their best bet so they rank them above Ivey and Queen's.

Just like that..

Personally I rank McGill above all of these schools because of McGill's reputation outside of Canada, it's a party university, big city, opportunity to learn french and become billingual and the tuition is 6K! And besides that... I want to get my MBA at an U.S. school so McGill has a pretty good reputation there and the program itself isn't THAT challenging so I might be able to get a good GPA.

Again these are my personal preferences.


+ 1 (but I'm not going to McGill)
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A photo of smarty1 smarty1

@g93 wrote

@goldmansachs wrote
You can't just rank them like that. Each person has different preferences... like some people don't like Ivey's 2+2.. so they think Queen's should be ranked first. Some people want to go into accounting and they see that Schulich/Waterloo is their best bet so they rank them above Ivey and Queen's.

Just like that..

Personally I rank McGill above all of these schools because of McGill's reputation outside of Canada, it's a party university, big city, opportunity to learn french and become billingual and the tuition is 6K! And besides that... I want to get my MBA at an U.S. school so McGill has a pretty good reputation there and the program itself isn't THAT challenging so I might be able to get a good GPA.

Again these are my personal preferences.


+ 1



+2

Ditto.

One can't possibly go wrong with any of these Universities / programs. It all depends on individual preferences at the end of the day. Also, Waterloo AFM and Rotman Commerce should also be on the list. :)
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A photo of thecookiemonster thecookiemonster
You totally forgot Nipissing.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
I'm quite fond of UBC <3 never heard about the others until senior year haha
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A photo of axiom2true axiom2true

@Alizarin wrote
I'm quite fond of UBC <3 never heard about the others until senior year haha



@Alizarin your PM inbox is full!
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@axiom2true wrote

@Alizarin wrote
I'm quite fond of UBC <3 never heard about the others until senior year haha



@Alizarin your PM inbox is full!



Oh okay I emptied it. Sorry bro.
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