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Undergraduate Engineering Tuition

A photo of albud289 albud289
Why is tuition for engineering much more expensive than for other undergraduate programs? For example at Waterloo and McMaster, first year engineering tuition is around $10 000 but first year science tuition is around $6000.
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A photo of plato plato

@albud289 wrote
Why is tuition for engineering much more expensive than for other undergraduate programs? For example at Waterloo and McMaster, first year engineering tuition is around $10 000 but first year science tuition is around $6000.



You are using 40-50% more resources. More classes, tutorials and labs. Look at the schedule of a science major vs. engineering and you will easily see why it costs more.
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A photo of greygoose greygoose
It's more subtle than that. Fields like science, math, and the liberal arts are fields with their tuition highly regulated by the government. Engineering, CS, finance, business programs, etc. are not, so schools can charge much more from them. The idea is that these fields make you more obviously employable, so the tuition doesn't need regulation because you can pay it back later. It's rather stupid, but it's the way it is.

The material costs between an eng and science degree are not that much different; certainly not $4000 different. Science students have labs ad tutorials, too.
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A photo of Yaroslav64 Yaroslav64
You also have to remember engineers take 6 courses a semester while everyone else takes 5.
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A photo of WaterfallOfDestiny WaterfallOfDestiny
It's not necessarily about resources. Commerce and finance students pay higher tuition fees than us (around $13k at UTSG, compared to $10k for engineers), and they certainly have fewer hours of class and no labs. The main reason why they pay so much is because business professors charge a premium for their services. Universities compete with each other for the best professors in order to maintain the reputation of their faculty.

In the case of business professors, imagine how much money an intelligent businessperson would've been making if they were in industry. Now, to make an academic career look more attractive, you have to pay a competitive salary. Same goes for engineering professors, whom could be doing pretty well if they were in industry.

Your intelligent historian, linguist, philosopher, or biologist doesn't have the same number of career opportunities out there. The university doesn't have as much demand for them, so they can offer lower salaries, which translates to lower tuition fees for Arts & Science students.

So if you're going into engineering... be glad that you'll be in higher demand in the job market than the arts and science students. =)

@greygoose: Are you sure the government regulates science, liberal arts, etc. tuition more than engineering tuition? As far as I know, it's a maximum 4.5% increase for the first year and 4% for the years afterward, irrespective of the type of undergraduate program.
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A photo of greygoose greygoose

@WaterfallOfDestiny wrote
@greygoose: Are you sure the government regulates science, liberal arts, etc. tuition more than engineering tuition? As far as I know, it's a maximum 4.5% increase for the first year and 4% for the years afterward, irrespective of the type of undergraduate program.



Yes, but how did the tuition discrepancies arise? There was a point at which CS tuition was entirely unregulated (*cough* dot.com bubble) and yet it hasn't come down since. Look at the basic arts, science, math, etc. tuition at any university, and then look at some of the more vocational programs. The difference is staggering.
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