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university of toronto engineering science

A photo of madox madox
hey, i'm just thinking of applying to engineering science, but i hear its really hard to get into, so i'm not sure if i should just choose a different engineering program.
so far my top 6 marks are

advanced functions - 94
calculus/vectors - around 95, i haven't check my report yet
data management - 97
english - 83
chemistry - around 84, again i haven't checked my mark
and physics, which i currently have an 88 in, but i think thats going to go up since i did good on my last lab.

average - about 90.16 percent

some of my main extra curriculars are robotics, piano, guitar, my 40 volunteer hours, and right now im doing a coop at a hospital working with medical physicists. i really hope my coop will help me in the admission process.
so do i have a good chance of getting into engineering science, or should i apply to trackone or mechanical engineering instead?
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A photo of onlymatthew onlymatthew
Engineering science is unlike pretty much any other engineering program.

You may think to yourself that because you are a bright individual in comparison to your classmates now that a prestigious program such as eng sci will be perfect for you! Beware though, as eng sci has perhaps the greatest drop out rate out of all undergraduate programs in Ontario. It's much more difficult than your standard engineering program (which let's admit, is already harder than most people can handle) and has benefits that may not be completely relevant to your interests.

The only scenarios I would recommend someone to go into engineering science is:

a) if they are extremely keen on research, as engineering science is typically more theoretical in nature
b) they are interested in entering one of the specialized fields that they offer (I don't remember all of them, but I know a very popular one is like aircraft engineering)
c) they are such a glutton for pain and hard work that they need to be surrounded by other keeners to derive a sense of purpose for their lives.

If none of these things apply to you, don't even bother with engineering science. Your science marks are also low-high 80's, while your math marks are considerably higher. This makes me wonder if you'd rather prefer a more math-oriented program?

In terms of being accepted, you're sort of on the fence. To be safe, you need about a 92ish, so you'd need to bump up your marks slightly. I know that they do accept a fair amount of people though, just because U of T uses sneaky "reel-in" tactics. U of T accepts a boatload of people, takes their first year money and then bell curves them into oblivion.

Good luck with your decision! Other engineering programs you may want to consider include: normal U of T engineering, UW engineering (great because of their co-op), Queen's engineering.
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A photo of ktel ktel
a) I don't understand the argument that a theoretical degree is more suited for research. Maybe if you're going to do research in the sciences, and not in engineering, but then you should get a science degree anyways. There are a whole lot more students in grad school that did a non eng sci degree than those that did an eng sci degree.
b) The specialized fields that eng sci offers are all offered within other engineering programs as well (aerospace engineering at Ryerson, for example)
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A photo of onlymatthew onlymatthew

@ktel wrote
a) I don't understand the argument that a theoretical degree is more suited for research. Maybe if you're going to do research in the sciences, and not in engineering, but then you should get a science degree anyways. There are a whole lot more students in grad school that did a non eng sci degree than those that did an eng sci degree.
b) The specialized fields that eng sci offers are all offered within other engineering programs as well (aerospace engineering at Ryerson, for example)



a) I didn't suggest a science degree simply because he didn't even express any interest in getting one. Engineering science is still a viable start to a career into research and they have programs that are designed to enrich this process. Research is simply one of the potential options that you can get from the degree. I believe the program is called ESROP.

http://engsci.utoronto.ca/experience/research.htm

And also, your claim of non eng sci degrees outweighing the amount of eng sci students is obvious... just in sheer statistics, there are way more people that didn't go to U of T engineering science than those that did.

b) This might be true for aerospace engineering, but eng sci is the only one that offers the engineering mathematics, statistics and finance module in Canada. You're right though, all of the other modules (nano, energy systems, etc) are offered at other universities, but I don't think that detracts from engineering science :cat:
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A photo of ktel ktel
Funny thing, the other day I was listening to one of the eng sci profs talking about the engineering math, statistics and finance module. He was shocked that they could even approve it as an engineering degree because he feels there is not enough engineering in it, and that they basically took the same program from business and called it engineering. U of T is getting reviewed by the accreditation board this year so we'll see how that goes.
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A photo of rightsaidfred rightsaidfred
Everyone seems to be obsessed with this program because it's the hardest engineering course at the top university in the country.
That's not a good reason to take it. Just because it's hard doesn't mean anything. You won't necessarily have better opportunities than anywhere else.

All engineering degrees are essentially the same coursework everywhere. This is undergrad we're talking about here. You're just learning facts from a facts book, like high school still.

There are minor differences yes, but I know that's not why you're interested.
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