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Uoft VS. Queen's

A photo of Linday19 Linday19
I have been accepted to both universities and I am having trouble deciding.

UofT: Studies in Humanities, St. Micheal's College
Queen's: Honours, Bachelor of Arts

I want to major in:
English and International Relations- UofT
English and Global Development- Queen's
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11 replies
 
A photo of heesoup heesoup
Queen's!
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A photo of cdkpsa cdkpsa
I'd go with Queen's.
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A photo of Quickstrike Quickstrike
DEFINITELY QUEEN'S, especially if you're good looking and fun and outgoing.
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A photo of flaunt flaunt
Are you planning on doing anything after your undergrad? If you are, I'd probably go to Queen's.

But from what I heard, U of T's International Relations program is top notch.

I plan on doing International Relations too, so I'm pretty much in the same boat as you.
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A photo of Queens14 Queens14
Wow, that's actually quite the hard decision.

I'm studying English at Queen's now and can say I'm not satisfied with the program, not broad enough and quite dry. Honestly, I pushed to a lot of profs in English this year to get their crap together because the English program is consistently inconsistent with their mark ranges, layout of the ENGL 100 credit and course offerings. Also, the marking scheme is at what I would range as 'difficult' here, not many marks over 80's throughout the people I know and the tutorial grade averages. If you're looking for a challenge, go Queen's: But understand other than with your ENGL and DEVS credit you'll need another three electives in the arts (for example: PHIL, HIST, RELS), it'll probably be the same at UofT anyways though, just different codes.

That's how your semester will look, though: five, full-year classes.

Perk at Queen's, though: Arts/Sci - So if you're strong in classes like Math, Economics, or Physics - you can take those and bump your average.

Now, UofT would be the same but you may be able to choose more extenstive and focalized studies at University of Toronto. I know someone in the International Development program and they said that although dry, he did extremely well (3.8 GPA first year) and was satisfied with the classes he took. From my own research, English Literature is moreso extensive at UofT compared to Queen's.

But, what vibe do you want? City or.. Kingston? UofT has a much bigger campus than Queen's and there's generally more people and hustling to get to class. Queen's is a slow-paced environment, for sure. Nonetheless, they're ceratainly going to both be pricey if you live on campus (~$20,000 Sept. - May all said and done). Ultimately, both great schools andd it's up to you.
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A photo of BeliefTheChief BeliefTheChief
My 2 cents....

UofT = More Work for a high grade.
Queens = Not as much work for a similar grade. This allows you to spend more time enjoying the experience and it wont limit your graduate studies decision is you choose to do so.
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A photo of bladerunner905 bladerunner905
Every single UofT vs. X school is overwhelmingly against UofT. I'm the only one defending it I find.

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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
If I were to sum up the main difference between Queen's and U of T, it would not be a difference in the quality of social life, but a difference that is determined mostly by the amount of funding that each school receives. U of T has a lot more money and resources than Queen's, so it has a lot more specialized and interesting courses than the ones offered at Queen's. There is also more money to go around for studying abroad and trips abroad, which would be of interest to you if you want to study global development/international relations. The downside is that, like any school located in the middle of a city, there is no cohesive school spirit. Any sense of school pride is mostly tied to your college identity or your program choice.
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A photo of Zion Zion

@Spengler wrote
If I were to sum up the main difference between Queen's and U of T, it would not be a difference in the quality of social life, but a difference that is determined mostly by the amount of funding that each school receives. U of T has a lot more money and resources than Queen's, so it has a lot more specialized and interesting courses than the ones offered at Queen's. There is also more money to go around for studying abroad and trips abroad, which would be of interest to you if you want to study global development/international relations. The downside is that, like any school located in the middle of a city, there is no cohesive school spirit. Any sense of school pride is mostly tied to your college identity or your program choice.


While U of T obviously does have more funding than Queen's (since it's so much bigger), I disagree that it's the most significant difference between the two. I would argue it's the atmosphere. Queen's is smaller, U of T is urban. Queen's is known for school spirit, U of T is known for its competitiveness. Queen's students are happy, U of T students are miserable.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@Zion wrote

@Spengler wrote
If I were to sum up the main difference between Queen's and U of T, it would not be a difference in the quality of social life, but a difference that is determined mostly by the amount of funding that each school receives. U of T has a lot more money and resources than Queen's, so it has a lot more specialized and interesting courses than the ones offered at Queen's. There is also more money to go around for studying abroad and trips abroad, which would be of interest to you if you want to study global development/international relations. The downside is that, like any school located in the middle of a city, there is no cohesive school spirit. Any sense of school pride is mostly tied to your college identity or your program choice.


While U of T obviously does have more funding than Queen's (since it's so much bigger), I disagree that it's the most significant difference between the two. I would argue it's the atmosphere. Queen's is smaller, U of T is urban. Queen's is known for school spirit, U of T is known for its competitiveness. Queen's students are happy, U of T students are miserable.



Have you attended either school yet? If you haven't, and you are just regurgitating hearsay, you ought to be more careful about making such sweeping generalizations about both schools. For the record, I am not saying that Queen's is a lesser school than U of T. I recognize that U of T is not for everybody. I am just saying that the funding each school receives, as well as their respective locations, contribute to a different feel in terms of school life and education.

Like I said earlier, I agree that there is no cohesive school spirit at U of T for all three campuses. There is, however, a strong and relatively close-knit community tied to each college, while UTSC and UTM have their own respective communities. To expect all three campuses to have a unified school spirit is like asking every resident of Toronto to feel like they belong to the same cultural identity. It's just not possible on a sociological level. Does that make U of T a bad school? Only for those who are looking for a smaller student population with a more cohesive identity and school spirit, which is perfectly acceptable. To each his own.

(I'd like to point out to the original poster that the IR community at U of T is small, at a level where everyone knows each other and have a lot of fun together.)

I also agree that U of T seems more competitive, but mostly in the life sciences. Some people thrive on competition; others don't. Again, to each his own.

If it's at all relevant, I was pleased with the education and community feel I received from U of T. The connections I made, as well as the opportunities that I took advantage of there, have helped me get to where I want to be, both professionally and socially. Happy U of T students do exist. :)
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A photo of vfenwicksehl vfenwicksehl
If you're having trouble deciding, focus on the atmosphere of the school. Keep in mind that you will be living here for the next four years, and you want to be comfortable with the campus. Honestly, the school where you do your undergrad hold almost no weight when applying to graduate schools. All that matters is what you have done while attending the school (grades, extracurriculars, etc.). I can't speak for U of T with regards to atmosphere, but as a Queen's student, I feel like I am part of a community, and I am very comfortable moving around Kingston. For all I know, it could be the same at U of T, but all that matters is how you feel when you take you campus tour.
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