yconic - Wanting to become an accountant, should I consider schools that don't have a co-op?
Explore yconic
Explore Student Life Topics
Scotiabank
STUDENT CHAMPION
yconic proudly recognizes Student Champion Partners who are providing our community with superior support for their student journeys. Learn More
Student Help Brands

Wanting to become an accountant, should I consider schools that don't have a co-op?

A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Programs such as Ivey AEO & HBA, Queen's Commerce, Schulich Business, etc. do not have a co-op, so for someone who is dead set on becoming an accountant while other things such as tuition, residence, etc. are not a concern, do you think these programs hold comparable value to programs such as Waterloo AFM, Brock Accounting, Laurier Business, etc. who do have a co-op? Waterloo and Brock have the added benefit of having a MAcc, additionally all Waterloo SAF students who have an average equal or higher than 75% are automatically admitted into it.
Was this helpful? Yes 1
9 replies
 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
You can consider it, just keep in mind that you do have to complete 30 months of work experience so co op will help you a lot. If you don’t want to study then work then study or if you don’t want to worry about applying to a position at a company,working on your resume, and practicing your skills while your supposed to be studying and finishing work  or having to skip classes just to go to interviews, and dealing with the struggles of getting the notes later, and teaching yourself the lesson, then a co op option is not right for you. Then you should take a program without co op and then just work and complete those 30 months of experience after. Ideally, a program with co op is the best in universities like Waterloo, Brock, Guelph, Ottawa or Windsor because it does save you time. You can also use non coop programs as a back up. However, in the end it is up to you and what you feel comfortable with. Sorry about my poor grammar.
Was this helpful? Yes 1

 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
The problem with your line of reasoning, OP, is thinking that coop guarantees you a job and that there is no other way for you to get work experience besides coop. Plenty of students at these non-coop schools like Rotman, Schulich, Ivey, and Queen's go into accounting and get their CPA designations. In addition, how certain are you that 100% you want to become an accountant? High school accounting is a joke in comparison. I know some people who changed from accounting and thankfully they were in actual business programs which allowed them to do so. What are you going to do if you get into Waterloo AFM and Brock Accounting and realize later on that you dislike accounting?
Was this helpful? Yes 1

 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
I don't believe co-op guarantees a job and that you can't get work experience without one. What I'm saying is that the likelihood of getting work experience is higher with a co-op and asking if there are any non-co-op universities that have any significant advantages which redeem themselves and make them an equal or even better option than the listed co-op programs, not only from the perspective of work experience but overall. I'm certain I want to become an accountant because I've not only been taking the accounting courses but worked as an intern at an accounting firm for the past two years.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Co-op doesn't guarantee you a job but it does limit your competition. If you go to Waterloo, most of their co-ops are in the winter (busy season where most accounting firms hire) and the only schools you'll be competing for co-ops are Brock and Laurier.  That's much easier to obtain work experience than doing  summer internships (non-busy season) and competing  against the other 90% business schools (Queen's, Ivey, Schulich) that don't have co-op programs.
Was this helpful? Yes 2

 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Ok, so my top 3 unis are still Waterloo AFM, Brock Accounting, and Laurier BBA. Thanks for the help.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Waterloo AFM is super tough though. Good luck!
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
How so? Like what does the University do to make it a tough program?
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
^

The university doesn't have to do anything. It's supply and demand. If a program receives more applicants and more students want to go there, then they can boost the averages as they have a high demand. 
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Its tough because you have to balance the course load as well as go to a lot of networking events. Personally, the environment is pretty competitive as well, which does make it harder, but AFM is a super good program overall (stellar reputation, co-op, networking opportunities, professional development opportunities etc.)
Was this helpful? Yes 0