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What fields are for Math/Business?

A photo of waazup waazup
Hi. I'm in gr. 11 and currently interested in going into Business studies. For the past couple semesters, my average has been around 91-92+. My best and favourite subject is math. I am just curious to see what I can become if I go into something involving math or business? Currently I want to go to Schulich or any of the other 4 top business schools, but I am worried about the potential? I hear things like business is a field which has little employment nowadays, since a lot of ppl went into it. From my school, about 80% of the students want to go into science...so can we see a "turn-around" in the future? I'm even opening my options more to mathematics now, for something like an actuary. Is there anything that only accepts "EXCEPTIONAL" math students? Not just your typical 85 or 90+?

I do not like science, although I do exceptional at it. My main focus is math and/or business. So, what are the chances of obtaining a crazy finance career in business if I go to schulich or the other top 4 (Rotman, queen's, ivey) ??

And also, if you know, what are the chances of getting a good job in science vs. math/business?
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A photo of immaculatedx immaculatedx
Anyone who tells you there are better/more jobs in science (Specifically on the medical, health related side) than business is a fool. There are exponentially more jobs in the business world compared to the medical job field. Job prospectives on the engineering side of science however may or may not have better jobs compared to business but the lines between the fields are being more and more blurred in the present (Depending on what you like).

You seem to be off on a few things. You will not be doing much math at all on the business side of things - to be realistic. If you go to any of the top 4 B-Schools, you'll be well equipped simply name-wise to find a good job. There are different reasons to go to each though - Schulich is good for accounting, Ivey & Queens are good for finance/ibanking/consulting/etc. and Rotman is good for a more theoretical/textbook method of study and I guess a more broad business degree.

So if you want a "crazy finance career" your best bet would be to go to Ivey or Queens. Keep in mind however, that's pretty much going to be it for your math/technical education - the focus in these programs is to develop your soft-skills - ones that you'll need to succeed in Business. E.g. in Ivey, you won't ever need a textbook - your class will consist of case-methods where you will argue and debate cases.

Regarding jobs for EXCEPTIONAL math students - it's usually in finance - becoming a quant doing some crazy ass derivative pricing or whatnot.

If you want to COMBINE your interests in math and business - I heavily recommend Waterloo programs - they have many innovative and interdisciplinary programs that contain both fields. The jobs you get will be in the business field, and you'll be using the analytical skills you gained from learning math. You'll be well prepared to enter specifically the field of finance where strong quantitative skills are necessary. You can find jobs in sales and trading, etc.

Now I've kept this post VERY VERY [size=9]VERY[/size]broad to cover all points and get my point across. I was kind of in your mindset a year or so ago, so feel free to ask me questions.

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A photo of IanSharer IanSharer
Just to clarify, you're basing your math abilities on more than high school math, right? Functions and Advanced functions aren't that hard, especially in some schools. If you genuinely have an interest (do some math contests) then I'd definitely recommend Waterloo. Their Math/FARM, Math/CA and the Math/Business Double Degree with Laurier are good choices to check out.
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A photo of waazup waazup
Thank you a hella' lot. Lots of info. I know for a fact Schulich is known for accounting, since 80% of the students literally graduate to become accountants.

Well yeah my main field would be Finance. That's what I'm interested in and love about business. Queens and Ivey seem good, I might just take the plunge for it rather than Schulich. I'm starting to close out on Rotman, like you said it has a more broad business degree, but also that they accept students with mid 80s.

Besides the marks, do you know what/how many EC's are good?
Currently I'm in "3" solid clubs/teams. I can also write a bunch of other smaller stuff that I volunteered here and there, did this here and there (some of it even BS lol)..
If more is required, for sure I will join more. But will that basically sum up the requirements? (marks + essays + EC's)

I know that I'm only in gr. 11 but I was just curious, don't wanna get into trouble later on right.. Yeah thanks a lot man.
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A photo of immaculatedx immaculatedx
There was a thread posted before - and I'll quote it:

"The fit of the program also depends on what kind of finance you want to get into. Essentially, there are two overarching finance streams: Corporate finance and asset management. Corporate finance is more accounting based and requires more market knowledge; asset management is more math based and require more statistics knowledge.

Corporate finance roles include- Investment banking, Corporate banking, Private equity, Hedge fund, etc
Asset management roles include- Asset/risk management, Quant, passive investment, portfolio management, etc"
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A photo of waazup waazup
Yup, I have researched all those careers. Seems like finance is the best way to go for me. I really like corporate finance but also have a passion for asset management. Investment banking was my main goal but the options you've listed have opened up more possibilities, especially the others relating to math. Maybe the business world is the best place for me!...Still, is there really any potential in just a major in math (which I am sure there is)...if it is good, what schools are in Canada/America that are actually good? I know i'm getting a little to ahead of myself and you probably do not know American schools that well, do you know anything good that's down there?

Harvard, Stanford and Princeton are the most flashy universities and often projected as the best. It seems that it is too hard to get into? Just something with high expectations and I will definitely consider it. thanks for the brilliant info!!
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A photo of apple123 apple123
LET ME TLL YOU SOMETHING IF YOU HAVE THE MARKS THEN BECOME A ACTURIST!!! YOU WILL MAKE GOOD $$$
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A photo of FunnyBone FunnyBone
Is it true for Ivey that the case-method is mostly debating and arguing?
I wanted to go into finance, but I'm not the best at debating, or verbally communicating my ideas.

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A photo of immaculatedx immaculatedx

@FunnyBone wrote
Is it true for Ivey that the case-method is mostly debating and arguing?
I wanted to go into finance, but I'm not the best at debating, or verbally communicating my ideas.





If you're not in to the whole social side but you're deadset on finance - I'd suggest Waterloo Math/FARM or Math BBA Double Degree w/ Laurier.

The point of Ivey (Now I can only tell you what I've researched), is dive into real life issues, make and defend REAL decisions, "feel the pressure and take action".

This is quoted directly from Ivey's brochure - "Ivey is not about textbooks and lectures, it's about learning by doing" - and they do achieve this by mainly using the case method for learning.
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A photo of immaculatedx immaculatedx
If you're into finance and you want to understand it from a technical perspective, Waterloo Math & CA/Farm/BBA combinations would be a good fit depending on what type of business exposure you want.
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A photo of immaculatedx immaculatedx

@waazup wrote
Yup, I have researched all those careers. Seems like finance is the best way to go for me. I really like corporate finance but also have a passion for asset management. Investment banking was my main goal but the options you've listed have opened up more possibilities, especially the others relating to math. Maybe the business world is the best place for me!...Still, is there really any potential in just a major in math (which I am sure there is)...if it is good, what schools are in Canada/America that are actually good? I know i'm getting a little to ahead of myself and you probably do not know American schools that well, do you know anything good that's down there?

Harvard, Stanford and Princeton are the most flashy universities and often projected as the best. It seems that it is too hard to get into? Just something with high expectations and I will definitely consider it. thanks for the brilliant info!!



K, many people want iBanking because the description is so god dam sexy, but it's really not suited for everybody.

If you're in grade 11 by now and haven't been preparing for the States (SATs and getting extraordinary EC's) there's no way you can get in no matter how much crap you do from now on.

For pure math, Waterloo and UofT have the best programs. Waterloo being better for applicability for work and uoft better in terms of academics and research.
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A photo of FunnyBone FunnyBone
From what I've heard, both of those programs are VERY intense, and the workload is enormous.
I'm not the strongest math student, so I'm not sure I'd be able to handle Waterloo math.

Based on that, if I want to go into finance, which school would be better?

Because on one hand, I feel that debating and arguing is something you can practice, and improve upon.
Whereas math - I just don't have that natural ability for it.
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A photo of immaculatedx immaculatedx
I explain to you the general two sides of finance ... you don't like both of them ... and yet you still want to go into finance ... o_O

If you hate the idea of the case method - which isn't just purely classified as debating, orelse it'd be called debate, and not business case methods, ... then you FOR SURE won't like Ivey. Queens is an option but again, if you don't like the soft skills, you won't succeed. You say you don't like math do that eliminates all the more quantitative sides of finance... what do you want me to say lol.
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A photo of FunnyBone FunnyBone
Haha noo. Maybe I wasn't clear, sorry.

I do enjoy math, it's just I know I don't have a natural aptitude for it. It takes me far, far longer than others to grasp a concept, and I'm not sure if I'd be able to keep up with others in an intense program such as DD. (even if I do enjoy math)

And it's not that I don't enjoy the soft skills, but I'm just really mediocre at debating.

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A photo of saber33 saber33
Perhaps Marketing is a better path for you.
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