yconic - What is your opinion on hard teachers?
Hide Menu

My Feed Money for School Student Help Brands Winners Support Center



Explore yconic
Explore Student Life Topics
Scotiabank
STUDENT CHAMPION
yconic proudly recognizes Student Champion Partners who are providing our community with superior support for their student journeys. Learn More
Student Help Brands

What is your opinion on hard teachers?

A photo of brady23 brady23
Is it worth the lower mark for more knowledge?

For example, a hard english teacher will benefit you if you are going into English or Social Sciences, but if you are going into math or science, will it really help you?

Also, a hard math teacher will benefit you if you are going into engineering, but will it be worth it if you are going into life science? Sure, I'll take math in first year, but I'm not going to be taking it all the way until fourth year and I won't be getting a phd in math.

Also, do you think it is fair to have a very hard teacher when someone else has an easy teacher (or less hard teacher) in another school, or even at your school? What if that is the reason you can't get accepted to the program of your choice?

Just interested in people's opinions.

I don't get why English teachers have to treat it as a literature class, and I don't understand why my math teacher treats our class like we are in AP. I do want to be prepared for first year university, but not to the extent where I'm struggling to get over an 85 in the class. Is it worth getting an 80 in the harder class than getting a 90 in the easier class?
Was this helpful? Yes 0
20 replies
 
A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
Teachers who mark harshly do not necessarily teach you more material, and teachers who mark generously do not necessarily teach you little. One of my best teachers in high school was my grade 12 English teacher: he was a fairly generous marker but taught us a lot. Thanks to him, I got top marks in my university writing and English courses.

I would like a teacher who marks fairly, but I would rather have a teacher who marks generously than one who marks harshly, all other things being equal. The disadvantage of having a good teacher who marks generously is that you'll be in shock when your marks drop a bit in university. In that case, just keep in mind that, so long as he or she was a good one, your teacher will have prepped you well for the less generous, higher expectation marking habits of university professors.

If you need to rationalize having a hard teacher, know that, statistically, you've probably also had your fair share of easy teachers, so it all equals out in the end. If that's not enough or not true (though you're probably not a good judge of its truth), then, well, the world is not a fair place. Get used to it.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Ba Ba Blue Ba Ba Blue
I'm in a Con.Ed program so this is the type of discussion that comes up regularly in my education courses in relation to evaluation. Evaluation is currently a controversial topic in education and will continue to be indefinitely.

I am of the opinion that high school students should be prepared for university, but understand the need to have marks mean the same thing across the province, regardless of who your teacher is and what school you go to, for the purposes of admissions. It's for this reason that I support having all grade 12 courses evaluated by the government, not the classroom teacher (think EQAO, but several assessments throughout the year). That way the tougher standard is imposed on everyone, and the standard is the same regardless of which high school you went to. In the end this will result in people being ready for university AND fair admissions for all.

Unfortunately this takes a lot of time and money to implement, but if we had OUAC running it and university application fees being used to finance the test then hundreds of teachers would get jobs and it wouldn't cost anything for the government.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of SassyAmbivalence SassyAmbivalence
Hard teachers?

Keep you away from scholarships and entrance into your dream program.

I don't see their usefulness. Take my law teacher for instance. I had high 70's on my law test recently. I had the second highest grade, the kid after me had a 65% average.

The problem with our course is that it is highly subjective. My teacher's excuse for lowering our grades is 'University ain't easy, you need a reality check'.

It's unfair because kids at other schools have it easy. For instance, a 85% in English at my school - is a 94% at our neighbor school. I honestly hope universities take that into consideration.

I'm glad for the new teachers at my school who don't know the ropes of making our lives miserable yet. They're generous in their grades - yet we learn much more from them.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Piminion Piminion
Grading is a very subjective thing. Each teacher has their own style and way of marking. If you have a hard teacher I suggest you confront them after class or at the end of the day and ask them for possible feedback as to why your getting the marks you have.

More often than not, they are willing to go over with you problems you've made and things you can do to improve.

Student-teacher consultations are a key aspect in getting what you want.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Joshki Joshki

I had high 70's on my law test recently



I finished that course last year with a super easy teacher and ended up with 97.

Personally, I like easy teachers because they give you a better chance of being accepted into the programs that you like. For hard-marking teachers who are like "you need to be prepared for uni next year..." I'm just like "thats not really what you should be worried about, just give me the mark i need for my program and I can handle it next year myself" lol
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
This post was deleted

 
A photo of jelly jelly
Its a pretty big deal if you're not getting into your program of choice because of these teachers, but otherwise they are probably for the better. My physics class average is 10% lower than the other class, and the highest mark is around a 10% difference too (98 to 89 lol). My teacher is great at teaching though - we really understand the concepts, just she pushes us a bit too hard on the test questions. I've heard plenty of good stories about people getting 80s in her class and doing decently in university-level courses as in engineering and such, so I'm fairly relieved. I'm somewhat confident that I'll be able to get into most of the programs I'm applying to even though I'll be a bit shy of that 90 average, but meh, can't have it all.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of rightsaidfred rightsaidfred
No. The extra knowledge isn't worth anything.
A university you apply to won't care how much knowledge you've acquired or how hard your teacher was - all they'll see is the 70% average you have and turn you down.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of sllencer sllencer

@rightsaidfred wrote
No. The extra knowledge isn't worth anything.
A university you apply to won't care how much knowledge you've acquired or how hard your teacher was - all they'll see is the 70% average you have and turn you down.





That is sadly true. Some people with 90s (who had easy teachers) might "know less" than you but still get in.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of inthemaking inthemaking
Everyone gets a hard teacher for one course or another. You may have a hard teacher for English but someone else may have a hard teacher for bio. Life happens. I think it's highly unlikely that a hard teacher would prevent you from getting into a program though if you put in enough effort into doing well, and especially if you're doing well in your other courses.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of SassyAmbivalence SassyAmbivalence

@inthemaking wrote
Everyone gets a hard teacher for one course or another. You may have a hard teacher for English but someone else may have a hard teacher for bio. Life happens. I think it's highly unlikely that a hard teacher would prevent you from getting into a program though if you put in enough effort into doing well, and especially if you're doing well in your other courses.



Ha. Of course for one course or another. Except if the one teaching you 3 of your 8 classes is the exact same teacher. One of the many disadvantages of a small school. I want to get into McGill, and somehow I am confident that universities take "hard schools" into consideration without mentioning it. Kids at my school are always borderline in the cut-offs for their first choice and still get in into schools like queens and McGill. My principal is very sweet and knows that teachers don't quite grade fairly but what can she do? Can't teach an old dog new tricks!

The best kid at our school has a 92 average. I'm right after with an 88. That's frig problematic.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of cherrypie725 cherrypie725
As someone already mentioned, it'll balance out. You'll have some hard markers and some easy markers, that's life. Universities know this and that's why most competitive programs require a supplementary application.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of ktel ktel

@SassyAmbivalence wrote
My teacher's excuse for lowering our grades is 'University ain't easy, you need a reality check'.



That's what my mechanics teacher said to me in grade 12 when I got a low mark on a test that was administered very unfairly. He said "I bet you've never done poorly on anything in your whole life. Well I'm preparing you for university" blah blah blah. Well that never happened in university, so he was wrong.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of rightsaidfred rightsaidfred
>That is sadly true. Some people with 90s (who had easy teachers) might "know less" than you but still get in.


Yep. This is the problem with standardized education. Everyone gets the same education, no matter what country you're in. The problem is that teachers should be somehow standardized so that everyone gets the same education... because whether or not you learn the same calculus when you're in Ontario or British Columbia is not really the problem here.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of brady23 brady23

@jelly wrote
Its a pretty big deal if you're not getting into your program of choice because of these teachers, but otherwise they are probably for the better. My physics class average is 10% lower than the other class, and the highest mark is around a 10% difference too (98 to 89 lol). My teacher is great at teaching though - we really understand the concepts, just she pushes us a bit too hard on the test questions. I've heard plenty of good stories about people getting 80s in her class and doing decently in university-level courses as in engineering and such, so I'm fairly relieved. I'm somewhat confident that I'll be able to get into most of the programs I'm applying to even though I'll be a bit shy of that 90 average, but meh, can't have it all.



That's exactly how I feel. My math teacher is very hard, but previous students who get like 76 with her are getting 80s in university math. I know I will be prepared for university for math, but is it really worth it if I'm going into life science and likely won't be using math past first or second year. Most people are taking this course only because it's a prerequisite for a first year course, not because they want to get a phD in math or become an engineer. She could even bell curve and that would be the best of both worlds, you have a hard teacher that teaches you, but your average won't be killed.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of cherrypie725 cherrypie725

@brady23 wrote
That's exactly how I feel. My math teacher is very hard, but previous students who get like 76 with her are getting 80s in university math. I know I will be prepared for university for math, but is it really worth it if I'm going into life science and likely won't be using math past first or second year. Most people are taking this course only because it's a prerequisite for a first year course, not because they want to get a phD in math or become an engineer. She could even bell curve and that would be the best of both worlds, you have a hard teacher that teaches you, but your average won't be killed.


This is one of the good things about IB, at least in Ontario. If a teacher gives you a test made up entirely of questions from past IB exams, there's a standard IB conversion scale that raises marks for OSSD. It's not like they're just giving away free marks though... it's ridiculously hard to do well on IB math/science tests since they mark using a very specific markscheme. Even though it's harder to get a good raw score on a test, we're not disadvantaged for it. Now if only my stupid biology teacher would learn how to do the mark conversions....
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of picottj001 picottj001
I go to the BEST high school in Ontario according to the fraser institute http://www.ourkids.net/blog/fraser-institute-2011-ontario-yukon-british-columbia-high-school-rankings-10020/ and achieving high marks is literally impossible. I can guarantee you that no one from my graduating class will get into a prestigious program such as Ivey Business, Schulich(spelling?) and the like. So far, according to the midterm marks of semester 1, the ranking of people on the honour roll for the grade 12 class is as follow:

1. 86%
2. 83%
3. 81.5%
4. 80.5%

Do universities look at the high school you're from? PLEASE SAY YES!!
I know they officially say no, but do they look at it “under the table” per se?
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of erudite erudite

@picottj001 wrote
I go to the BEST high school in Ontario according to the fraser institute http://www.ourkids.net/blog/fraser-institute-2011-ontario-yukon-british-columbia-high-school-rankings-10020/ and achieving high marks is literally impossible. I can guarantee you that no one from my graduating class will get into a prestigious program such as Ivey Business, Schulich(spelling?) and the like. So far, according to the midterm marks of semester 1, the ranking of people on the honour roll for the grade 12 class is as follow:

1. 86%
2. 83%
3. 81.5%
4. 80.5%

Do universities look at the high school you're from? PLEASE SAY YES!!
I know they officially say no, but do they look at it “under the table” per se?




Wow what kind of programs did last years graduating class go to?
And its rumoured that universities look at your high school but i dont think anyone knows for sure. Everyone in this forum keeps saying that the cut off for schulich is 91%, but one of my teachers told me that he's had students get in with a high 80 (no clue what their ECs were). I checked york's website and it says 13% of their registrants got in with a high 80, and 70%+ got in with a 90-92% avg. My high school is within the top 100 in ontario ... (around 70-90)
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of sherrybloosm sherrybloosm
The hardest teacher I've ever had was my grade 10 and 11 religion teacher. He assigned us an average of 100 questions per week (for reals), and he graded them even more critically than my English teacher would have. He made us memorize every detail of the Afghan conflict, the Somalia conflict, the Uganda civil war, and many other world issues (totally not following the curriculum). He is also the best teacher I've ever had. I think I learned more from him than any other teacher or course I’ve ever taken thus far. He is the reason why I love politics and international relations.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of picottj001 picottj001

@erudite wrote

@picottj001 wrote
I go to the BEST high school in Ontario according to the fraser institute http://www.ourkids.net/blog/fraser-institute-2011-ontario-yukon-british-columbia-high-school-rankings-10020/ and achieving high marks is literally impossible. I can guarantee you that no one from my graduating class will get into a prestigious program such as Ivey Business, Schulich(spelling?) and the like. So far, according to the midterm marks of semester 1, the ranking of people on the honour roll for the grade 12 class is as follow:

1. 86%
2. 83%
3. 81.5%
4. 80.5%

Do universities look at the high school you're from? PLEASE SAY YES!!
I know they officially say no, but do they look at it “under the table” per se?




Wow what kind of programs did last years graduating class go to?
And its rumoured that universities look at your high school but i dont think anyone knows for sure. Everyone in this forum keeps saying that the cut off for schulich is 91%, but one of my teachers told me that he's had students get in with a high 80 (no clue what their ECs were). I checked york's website and it says 13% of their registrants got in with a high 80, and 70%+ got in with a 90-92% avg. My high school is within the top 100 in ontario ... (around 70-90)



All the top students from last year's graduating class went to U of T for micro-biology or anything related to life sciences. Oddly enough, i talked to one of them and he said that his average is 100%. He added that university is pretty much a joke for students graduating from our school (sorry, this statement is quite show-off).
My economics teacher told my class that in 2004, 2 students from our school were accepted to Schulich with a very low 80/high 70 average.
Was this helpful? Yes 0