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What kinda of Life Sciences program at U of T?

A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Hey. I was interested in knowing what kind of life sciences program is best at u of t? It's time for University applications already and I want to be a pharmacist. So i know I have to do 2 years of undergrad then apply to pharmacy school and go from there. But my real concern is that what if I don't get into pharmacy school? Then I don't want to end up in the wrong life sciences field but I also need the average to make it to pharmacy school.

The universities I will be applying to are UTSG, UTSC, Waterloo, and UOIT.
If I get into UTSC, that's where I will be going. Unless I get into Waterloo's CAP program. Which is very doubtful, but no harm in trying (except the additional cost of applying)

So in short, what kind of life sciences should I be applying to? I need ideas and suggestions.

Thanks
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
Whatever interests you most. If you don't quite know what that is, then don't fret: the first and second years of all life science programs generally share the same courses; transferring from one program to another is usually just a simple thing.

Reality is, life science programs are in very little demand. One program is really no more employable than any other. If employability is your concern, then which life science you choose is not what you should be concerned about; getting experience is.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Alright. I am interested in biochemistry and therefore will apply for that. If you are allowed to switch your program within the first 2 years, i assume you can change your major too right?

Also, what do you mean by life sciences is very little in demand? So if I want to be a pharmacist, will it be hard for me to get a job or pharmacy is in demand, just a straight out undergrad in life sciences is not?
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A photo of Numberwang Numberwang
They ask you to pick a program on your OUAC application, but in reality all they want is to get an idea of what sort of programs applicants are interested in. So what you pick right now has no bearing on what you'll be doing in first year. You only get to choose your majors at the end of first year.

When you get in, you'll be in a program called "Life Sciences." This pretty much just gives you priority in course registrations for first year biology, chemistry, and physics courses. By second year, you can pretty much enroll in any program you want. This means you can take major in biochem, or you can major in math and even humanities. But if you plan on graduating with a BSc, you will be required to at least take a number of higher-level sciences.

If you're interested in doing life science-related programs though, take a look at UT undergrad programs page (you'll have to scroll down a bit). There are a ton. I'd get ahead though on trying to narrow down what programs you want to enroll in for second year early though, to make sure you can register for all your program requirement courses.

I think what mynameismattgotmlgo is saying is that a BSc doesn't get you very far. If you truly want to pursue sciences, you'll at least need a Masters, and sometimes a PhD before you're eligible for any kind of job offerings. Pharmacy is in a different category, since it's a professional program, much like med school or nursing. Prospects in pharmacy really depends on supply and demand, if you want to work closer to the city, expect more competition for jobs.
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A photo of ktel ktel

@Numberwang wrote
I think what mynameismattgotmlgo is saying is that a BSc doesn't get you very far. If you truly want to pursue sciences, you'll at least need a Masters, and sometimes a PhD before you're eligible for any kind of job offerings. Pharmacy is in a different category, since it's a professional program, much like med school or nursing. Prospects in pharmacy really depends on supply and demand, if you want to work closer to the city, expect more competition for jobs.



A graduate degree is not the only way to be employed with a science degree in a science field. You do require experience and skills that set you apart.
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