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What science undergrad program do I apply to?

A photo of billnyescienceguy billnyescienceguy
Hey I am having trouble figuring out which undergrad programs I should apply to if I am planning on going into Pharmacy or Med School.

So far I have these on my list:

McMaster - Life Science
University of Toronto - Life Science
Western - Biological and Medical Science

but I don't know why program to apply to at these schools:

University of Ottawa (Health Sciences or BioMed?)
University of Guelph
University of Carleton
York

Those 4 don't have a Life Science program so I don't know which one I should take for Med and Pharmacy.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Life Science is a broad term, it pretty much covers the wide spectrum of disciplines within or associated with biology. First year of Life Sciences is general where you'll be taking a common first year with other students, after that you branch off into different majors or specializations such as; Animal Physiology, Biochemistry, Cellular & Molecular Biology, Psychology, Neuroscience, etc...

Ultimately look into what major or specialization you'd realistically see yourself enjoying. Med School & Pharmacy just needs you to have successfully completed certain required courses, and have obtained a high GPA, and also present MCAT results (depending on the school)

Just because a University doesn't have a program called "Life Sciences" doesn't mean they don't have Life Sciences lol. Each University varies on what they call their programs, for example at York they're program will be called Biology, at Guelph it'll be Biological Sciences, catch my drift?

It's true that, certain schools have much more specializations then others, that is particularly true when comparing York to U of T. Some schools will have a general Biology program where you take different courses all through out and others have specialized degrees focusing on a specific field of study within a science discipline.

In regards to picking a school, seriously just go where you want to go. It's all down to preference and the research you've done looking into the programs and schools. Your mind will tell you which one you want to go to. Visit the Universities and get a feel for the campuses to know where'd you'd feel comfortable spending your undergraduate studies.

If you have any further questions just ask!
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
^ I like this guy. One of the few high school students who has actually done the research that I would expect of prospective university students.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@mynameismattgotmlgo wrote
^ I like this guy. One of the few high school students who has actually done the research that I would expect of prospective university students.



Thanks for the compliment, much appreciated, especially coming from you man:cheers:

One of the few things I learned from reading this forum and speaking with students is their lack of knowledge of the field they are planning on pursuing. Asking a bunch of questions on here won't necessarily help you out. Doing research, and finding the answers isn't a difficult thing to do, just takes effort. I don't mind helping out fellow students but I'd like to see initiative in them.
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
A lot of questions can be answered through simple internet research; others are best asked on forums like this one. A lot of us old timers get tired of answering questions of the former group, like the one asked by the OP in this thread. As a result, the answers typically come from other high school students who are almost as clueless as the OP.

You have to be independent and able to figure out things on your own to be successful in university. It's easy to say that you'll change when you get to university, but this is a big decision for you now; you should be putting a lot of thought into it. For some reason, it pains me to know that people don't even care enough to do some internet searching. Like how are they not just naturally curious to want to find the answers to these questions on their own? When I was looking to buy a car, I didn't just look for the cars I heard were good and that had names I liked; I did a lot of internet research to find out which was right for me, and I'm thankful I did (and the thing is, I actually enjoyed the research aspect of it).
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A photo of billnyescienceguy billnyescienceguy

@Medic93 wrote
Life Science is a broad term, it pretty much covers the wide spectrum of disciplines within or associated with biology. First year of Life Sciences is general where you'll be taking a common first year with other students, after that you branch off into different majors or specializations such as; Animal Physiology, Biochemistry, Cellular & Molecular Biology, Psychology, Neuroscience, etc...

Ultimately look into what major or specialization you'd realistically see yourself enjoying. Med School & Pharmacy just needs you to have successfully completed certain required courses, and have obtained a high GPA, and also present MCAT results (depending on the school)

Just because a University doesn't have a program called "Life Sciences" doesn't mean they don't have Life Sciences lol. Each University varies on what they call their programs, for example at York they're program will be called Biology, at Guelph it'll be Biological Sciences, catch my drift?

It's true that, certain schools have much more specializations then others, that is particularly true when comparing York to U of T. Some schools will have a general Biology program where you take different courses all through out and others have specialized degrees focusing on a specific field of study within a science discipline.

In regards to picking a school, seriously just go where you want to go. It's all down to preference and the research you've done looking into the programs and schools. Your mind will tell you which one you want to go to. Visit the Universities and get a feel for the campuses to know where'd you'd feel comfortable spending your undergraduate studies.

If you have any further questions just ask!



Yeah that's kinda what I meant, what is the Life Science courses called in the 4 schools, so you said it's just Biology at York, Biological Sciences at Guelph, what about Carleton and Ottawa?
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
This is exactly what I'm talking about. I don't know the answer to your question, but I can figure it out quite easily. Google "Carleton University" -> click link to its home page -> look for links on home page that may answer my question -> "Future Students" (that's me! Seems like a logical link to check) -> click on that link -> click on "Programs" link (my question has to do with programs, so it seems like a logical next step) -> click on "Science" link (my question specifically has to do with science programs) -> now I see a list of science programs, some of which I am interested in. Bioinformatics, Biochemistry, Biology (BSc), Biotechnology, Computational Biochemistry, Computational Biology, Neuroscience, and Neuroscience and Mental Health all seem up my alley. Maybe I might apply to one.

Now you can do the same for the University of Ottawa.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@billnyescienceguy wrote

@Medic93 wrote
Life Science is a broad term, it pretty much covers the wide spectrum of disciplines within or associated with biology. First year of Life Sciences is general where you'll be taking a common first year with other students, after that you branch off into different majors or specializations such as; Animal Physiology, Biochemistry, Cellular & Molecular Biology, Psychology, Neuroscience, etc...

Ultimately look into what major or specialization you'd realistically see yourself enjoying. Med School & Pharmacy just needs you to have successfully completed certain required courses, and have obtained a high GPA, and also present MCAT results (depending on the school)

Just because a University doesn't have a program called "Life Sciences" doesn't mean they don't have Life Sciences lol. Each University varies on what they call their programs, for example at York they're program will be called Biology, at Guelph it'll be Biological Sciences, catch my drift?

It's true that, certain schools have much more specializations then others, that is particularly true when comparing York to U of T. Some schools will have a general Biology program where you take different courses all through out and others have specialized degrees focusing on a specific field of study within a science discipline.

In regards to picking a school, seriously just go where you want to go. It's all down to preference and the research you've done looking into the programs and schools. Your mind will tell you which one you want to go to. Visit the Universities and get a feel for the campuses to know where'd you'd feel comfortable spending your undergraduate studies.

If you have any further questions just ask!



Yeah that's kinda what I meant, what is the Life Science courses called in the 4 schools, so you said it's just Biology at York, Biological Sciences at Guelph, what about Carleton and Ottawa?



A little bit of research online can really take you far, sitting on this forum and waiting for me or anyone else to reply shouldn't be your approach to these questions. As a young student who will be potentially entering University you should learn how to utilize the resources you are provided with. I'll answer your question cause I'm nice, Ottawa has 4 programs you'd probably be interested in (Biology, Biomedical Sciences, Health Science, & Biopharmacuetical Sciences) as for Carleton they have a Biology program and also some other ones you might be interested in: [url]http://admissions.carleton.ca/programs/science[/url]

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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@mynameismattgotmlgo wrote
This is exactly what I'm talking about. I don't know the answer to your question, but I can figure it out quite easily. Google "Carleton University" -> click link to its home page -> look for links on home page that may answer my question -> "Future Students" (that's me! Seems like a logical link to check) -> click on that link -> click on "Programs" link (my question has to do with programs, so it seems like a logical next step) -> click on "Science" link (my question specifically has to do with science programs) -> now I see a list of science programs, some of which I am interested in. Bioinformatics, Biochemistry, Biology (BSc), Biotechnology, Computational Biochemistry, Computational Biology, Neuroscience, and Neuroscience and Mental Health all seem up my alley. Maybe I might apply to one.

Now you can do the same for the University of Ottawa.



It baffles me on how OP needs to literally be guided through every single step to find something that can be done within a matter of minutes with (Google). I see this forum as a place for discussion not asking "what life science programs are offered."
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@mynameismattgotmlgo wrote
A lot of questions can be answered through simple internet research; others are best asked on forums like this one. A lot of us old timers get tired of answering questions of the former group, like the one asked by the OP in this thread. As a result, the answers typically come from other high school students who are almost as clueless as the OP.

You have to be independent and able to figure out things on your own to be successful in university. It's easy to say that you'll change when you get to university, but this is a big decision for you now; you should be putting a lot of thought into it. For some reason, it pains me to know that people don't even care enough to do some internet searching. Like how are they not just naturally curious to want to find the answers to these questions on their own? When I was looking to buy a car, I didn't just look for the cars I heard were good and that had names I liked; I did a lot of internet research to find out which was right for me, and I'm thankful I did (and the thing is, I actually enjoyed the research aspect of it).



I once had the mentality that it was just easier to ask others or rely on them for answers and not have to do anything myself. I soon quickly realized that with that kind of attitude I'll be setting myself up for failure. Since then I researched everything myself and If I need further insight I'd seek advice from people directly involved with what I require more information on.
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