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Which computer science discipline involves the LEAST programming?

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Due to the relatively unemployable nature of a pure maths degree, I am planning to pursue a joint degree or minor in computer science. But the thing is, I hate programming. So which computer science discipline involves the least programming?

Also, what kind of maths-related degrees are there, that are as employable as engineering or computer science, other than computer science, only with a bachelors degree? (I don't think a bachlers in Statistics are not quite as well-employed as computer science. Surely a masters is, however.
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A photo of immaculatedx immaculatedx
I'm assuming you go to or are planning to go to UW.

If you do a joint degree or minor in computer science ... in either case there is no 'disciple' or major, you just have to satisfy the course requirements.

If you're looking for a math program, you might want to consider actuarial science.

...

But then again, if you choose your majors/careers based on those facts and along with the mindset you currently have, you're not going to get very far in life no matter what you do. Just my opinion.
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@immaculatedx wrote
But then again, if you choose your majors/careers based on those facts and along with the mindset you currently have, you're not going to get very far in life no matter what you do. Just my opinion.



Indeed it is true. But sometimes we have to make compromise with the reality. And I don't think a pure math degree isn't quite employable as a CS degree.

If your comment was on my mindset to avoid programming, well, I have tried to like it, kept telling my self 'oh programming is so much fun!' but yeah... no. So I am just trying to find the least objectional one.


@immaculatedx wrote
If you do a joint degree or minor in computer science ... in either case there is no 'disciple' or major, you just have to satisfy the course requirements.




I believe that I must satisfy the seven 'core' courses (240, 241, 245, 246, 251, 341, and 350) and three upper level courses to attain a joint degree. For example, I think I can specialize in software engineering if I take 445, 446, and 447, although it might be too superficial to call it a specialization by taking three courses whatsoever.
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A photo of greygoose greygoose
I thought I hated programming. It turned out that I just hated high-school level programming problems.

CS is quite a bit different once you get to university. I've written a variant of tetris for X11 in C++ and a small compiler in Scheme... both were really quite fun to complete.

Some code is tedious to write, other projects not so much.

Give it a real chance before you make up your mind.

Obviously, the theoretical (mathematical) disciplines of computer science usually offer the least programming: e.g. formal languages and parsing, algorithms and the like.
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I'll just stick to algorithms:)

I have absolutely no programming experience. Since I am planning on to take CS 135, I think I should spend this summer wisely. Should I study scheme language ahead or get close to CS and programming in general?
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@greygoose wrote
I thought I hated programming. It turned out that I just hated high-school level programming problems.

CS is quite a bit different once you get to university. I've written a variant of tetris for X11 in C++ and a small compiler in Scheme... both were really quite fun to complete.

Some code is tedious to write, other projects not so much.

Give it a real chance before you make up your mind.

Obviously, the theoretical (mathematical) disciplines of computer science usually offer the least programming: e.g. formal languages and parsing, algorithms and the like.



Yea. I found all of high school CS tedious and boring, except for the ISU, which I also created a Tetris game in Java. Was horrible but it worked.

@Waterfall
You can take a lot of math courses instead of programming. ID recommend just taking programming courses thought since it is an interesting subject. You can probably avoid
the hard programming at Waterloo because i think they have a strand of easy CS courses
to take for you required courses.
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A photo of greygoose greygoose

@waterfall wrote
I'll just stick to algorithms:)

I have absolutely no programming experience. Since I am planning on to take CS 135, I think I should spend this summer wisely. Should I study scheme language ahead or get close to CS and programming in general?



As I said in another thread, no need to rush with Scheme and accidentally pick up bad habits. Save your enthusiasm and wait for a good prof to teach you it when you get to school. I had no programming experience (barring a little C and casual scripting), and I turned out fine. I did have to put in a *lot* of work, though. But it wasn't something I could have done in advance.
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A photo of greygoose greygoose

@Bscit wrote
Yea. I found all of high school CS tedious and boring, except for the ISU, which I also created a Tetris game in Java. Was horrible but it worked.

@Waterfall
You can take a lot of math courses instead of programming. ID recommend just taking programming courses thought since it is an interesting subject. You can probably avoid
the hard programming at Waterloo because i think they have a strand of easy CS courses
to take for you required courses.



Everyone is required to take all of the following, reasonably-heavy coding courses:

- CS 135/136
- CS 246 (on occasion)
- CS 241
- CS 350

As for upper year courses, you have a lot of choice. You can go the algorithms 2/FLAP route (CS 466 and I think 467), or you could go the insane coding route with compilers, real-time, or graphics (CS 444, 452, 488). Quite a lot of flexibility with no bird courses required! The courses I listed here are pretty much the best/hardest 4th year offerings :)
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A photo of rolledoats rolledoats

@waterfall wrote
Due to the relatively unemployable nature of a pure maths degree, I am planning to pursue a joint degree or minor in computer science. But the thing is, I hate programming. So which computer science discipline involves the least programming?




@waterfall wrote
I'll just stick to algorithms:)

I have absolutely no programming experience. Since I am planning on to take CS 135, I think I should spend this summer wisely. Should I study scheme language ahead or get close to CS and programming in general?


???
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@rolledoats wrote

@waterfall wrote
Due to the relatively unemployable nature of a pure maths degree, I am planning to pursue a joint degree or minor in computer science. But the thing is, I hate programming. So which computer science discipline involves the least programming?




@waterfall wrote
I'll just stick to algorithms:)

I have absolutely no programming experience. Since I am planning on to take CS 135, I think I should spend this summer wisely. Should I study scheme language ahead or get close to CS and programming in general?


???



lol.

Well, I just saw some youtube video tutorial on programming and I did not like it. But still, I have absolutely no programming experience.
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A photo of immaculatedx immaculatedx
If you're into Math, chances are you'll be into many aspects of computer science.
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