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Which program should I go into???

A photo of LilyKatherinee LilyKatherinee
Hi everyone! I'm really confused about my future. I don't know whether I should go into a program in Math (finance) or Science (life science) or Nursing. Here's the pros and cons of each:

Math- Waterloo
- hard to learn
- never thought I'd ever pursue a career in this subject
- applied because I was good at math
- it's a neutral subject for me, i don't hate/like it

Science- University of toronto downtown
- want to become doctor
- can't find a job if I don't get into med school
- might not make it to med school
- enjoy campus

Nursing- queen's and mcgill
- tiring job
- taking care of others (good or bad?)
- can still take MCAT and become doctor
- some people think it's a degrading job

As you can tell, I am very confused. Any opinions would be great! Thanks :)
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A photo of inthemaking inthemaking
Just because you're good at something doesn't mean you'll enjoy a career in it. Do you actually want a career in the field? I'm good at math too but I have absolutely zero interest in working for the rest of my life with numbers and I would hate it.

Nursing->med school is a harder route than BSc->med school because typically nursing degrees don't have much flexibility (aka little to no electives) meaning it'll be hard to fulfill any prereqs that you would have to take for med school. What matters is whether YOU personally would be happy as a nurse if you couldn't become a doctor and whether you find it "degrading". The two careers are very different even though they do involve human health care. It pretty much comes down to whether you want to be involved with practicing science/medicine (doctor) vs. if you want to take care of patients and form close bonds with people (nurse). And if you find changing bedpans or helping patients go to the bathroom degrading then nursing is definitely not for you.
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A photo of LilyKatherinee LilyKatherinee
You're right, i definitely want to become a doctor, but i'm just worried that i won't get into med school. So, i'm trying to figure out what i should do instead. I still haven't figured out how i really feel about nursing. thanks though!
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A photo of mccannca466 mccannca466
Hi! If you've never thought of a career in Math, and you don't think you would enjoy, do not go into it. I have a friend in Math right now, and she doesn't really enjoy it. You want to take something you'll enjoy, it will make your workload easier.

For Science, this might be the best choice for you if your ultimate goal is med school. BUT if you are worried you won't make the cut, I would advise seeing an academic counselor about job opportunities with a Science degree. There are so many jobs you could potentially apply for with a Science undergrad, but if may require grad studies to stand out. But it's also at your preferred campus, so that is a plus!

And Nursing. Yes, it can be tiring, but overall it is a very rewarding profession. It has a guaranteed job after you graduate, you can even score a job before you graduate! You need to be very empathetic and want to serve others for this job. It's not degrading, it's a very important job. Who cares what others think? They obviously aren't aware of how wonderful a profession it is. If you are looking for job stability, nursing is the best choice. However, it IS an easier transition into med school from a science background, because nursing and med school have drastically different ways of thinking, as your role is drastically different.

My advice? Volunteer at a hospital or nursing home for a few months if possible. Alot of the things you will do are the responsibilities of nurses. If you like it, then nursing would be a good job for you. If not, you may want to reconsider your goals. Even doctors require some "scut work" that many look down on.
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A photo of LilyKatherinee LilyKatherinee

@mccannca466 wrote
Hi! If you've never thought of a career in Math, and you don't think you would enjoy, do not go into it. I have a friend in Math right now, and she doesn't really enjoy it. You want to take something you'll enjoy, it will make your workload easier.

For Science, this might be the best choice for you if your ultimate goal is med school. BUT if you are worried you won't make the cut, I would advise seeing an academic counselor about job opportunities with a Science degree. There are so many jobs you could potentially apply for with a Science undergrad, but if may require grad studies to stand out. But it's also at your preferred campus, so that is a plus!

And Nursing. Yes, it can be tiring, but overall it is a very rewarding profession. It has a guaranteed job after you graduate, you can even score a job before you graduate! You need to be very empathetic and want to serve others for this job. It's not degrading, it's a very important job. Who cares what others think? They obviously aren't aware of how wonderful a profession it is. If you are looking for job stability, nursing is the best choice. However, it IS an easier transition into med school from a science background, because nursing and med school have drastically different ways of thinking, as your role is drastically different.

My advice? Volunteer at a hospital or nursing home for a few months if possible. Alot of the things you will do are the responsibilities of nurses. If you like it, then nursing would be a good job for you. If not, you may want to reconsider your goals. Even doctors require some "scut work" that many look down on.



I did co-op at a hospital with nurses last summer and I got put into the best nursing department, because they don't have to work night shifts and the patients can somewhat take care of themselves. So, my mom is saying that most nurses are a lot more tiring and i won't be able to transfer to that unit until a lot of experiences.
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A photo of mccannca466 mccannca466
Did you like the work? I should point out that med school is tiring too - you will spend 10-15 years in post secondary education to become a doctor (counting undergrad, med school, residency, even more time if you wish to specialize). Nursing is 4 years, and then you're qualified. Even as a doctor you will get the crappiest shifts in your 2 years of residency, mostly night shifts. Both doctors and nurses can work terrible hours, and med school is EXTREMELY competitive. So if you are worried about horrible hours, then neither is right for you. I've talked to alot of med students, and those that are wish to become specialists such as cardiologists or plastic surgeons are competing against 40-50 other med students in their respective schools for only a few spots. Even if you wish to become a family doctor, you still have to work shift hours, often at night.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not pushing you one way or the other, I just think you should be aware of how tiring and difficult med school is. Only go for it if you are up to the challenge. Anything good will require fighting for it, and lots of commitment.
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A photo of LilyKatherinee LilyKatherinee

@mccannca466 wrote
Did you like the work? I should point out that med school is tiring too - you will spend 10-15 years in post secondary education to become a doctor (counting undergrad, med school, residency, even more time if you wish to specialize). Nursing is 4 years, and then you're qualified. Even as a doctor you will get the crappiest shifts in your 2 years of residency, mostly night shifts. Both doctors and nurses can work terrible hours, and med school is EXTREMELY competitive. So if you are worried about horrible hours, then neither is right for you. I've talked to alot of med students, and those that are wish to become specialists such as cardiologists or plastic surgeons are competing against 40-50 other med students in their respective schools for only a few spots. Even if you wish to become a family doctor, you still have to work shift hours, often at night.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not pushing you one way or the other, I just think you should be aware of how tiring and difficult med school is. Only go for it if you are up to the challenge. Anything good will require fighting for it, and lots of commitment.



i didn't mind the work they were doing. i am up to the challenge :) if i can get into med school. My parents and mine biggest concern right now is that i won't be able to get it
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A photo of mccannca466 mccannca466
OK, in that case, your best bet is to do some searching. Get counselling from an academic adviser on future careers from a Science degree besides med school. Have a good backup, then go for it. Talk to med students and professors at your 1st uni choice. They can give you pointers and tell you your chances of getting in with a Bachelor of Science.

If no other future career coming from it appeals to you, then go into nursing.
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