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Which Uni Best for Working Out of Country?

A photo of ManUtd123 ManUtd123
I'm wondering which university has the best connections outside of the country. Example: when done university you'd have a higher chance of working somewhere like NYC or London. Etc. I know it's ultimately about the students and their networking. I heard stories of McGill having a good reputation/connections with banks in NYC. Can others more informed tell me about this? Thanks.
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A photo of ktel ktel
When you're considering going outside of Canada you want a university with a big name such as U of T, McGill or UBC. Basically a school that a future employer will recognize.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
I'd say McGill, U of T, Schulich (but not York as a whole)...
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A photo of ManUtd123 ManUtd123
Which university is the best out of those 3. Or is it ultimately about how well you network and they're pretty much equivalent? Let's say I have a chance to work in NYC would I need to do iBBA in Schulich or is that only for foreign countries?

Thanks for the replies guys!
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A photo of immaculatedx immaculatedx
Schulich makes sense because of the iBBA. McGill makes sense because it's "Canada's Harvard". Top tier programs like Ivey and QC also make sense well because they're the best of the best.

I'd say Waterloo because of coop.
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A photo of ufoate ufoate
It depends on where u want to work? If your talking about Asia, I'm pretty sure UBC, UofT and mcgill. I'm from Singapore, and i'm pretty sure i haven't heard much about queens/waterloo/ivey, until i got here.
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A photo of ktel ktel

@immaculatedx wrote
I'd say Waterloo because of coop.



Bias...
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A photo of mxfire mxfire
I would say Ivey. Now, many of you may say I'm biased, and that may be.. but I did my research before picking a school, and the general consensus I found was Ivey.

However, my research was geared towards finance and consulting jobs. You may find different results if you were to look into other streams of business.

Just re-read your post and found that you mentioned banks in NYC. I can assure you that Ivey has the strongest reputation with banks down in states. A simple search at WSO will provide you with enough results regarding this.
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A photo of g93 g93

@ktel wrote

@immaculatedx wrote
I'd say Waterloo because of coop.



Bias...



It's a legitimate argument. Most places don't give a sh*t where you got your degree from (especially many years removed from said degree). However, if the work experience on your resume is highlighted by McDonald's, Tim Hortons and Ikea, you are screwed. If your work experience is highlighted by TD Securities, Deloitte Consulting and Barrick Gold, you will have a better chance. It doesn't matter if you came from Carleton or McGill. Waterloo's co-op gives you work experience and their students are able to land pretty impressive jobs. If you are going to rely on the name of your degree to get you places, don't get your hopes up.

Plus I could say bias to you. Same sh*t different pot.
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A photo of CRAZYBUBBA CRAZYBUBBA
The answers that you'll get are varied and not unbiased. To some extent it depends whether your employer is on Wall Street or Silicone Valley or elsewhere. The reason being that an employer in Silicone Valley would be aware of Waterloo's rep, Wall Street aware of schools like QC, Ivey, Etc but at the end of the day your school's name alone won't land you the job.

Go somewhere that's a good fit for you, a place that'll help you achieve your goals (whether by co-op, case competitions, extra-circulars, etc) don't let a school name or even degree name force you into doing something that you don't want. It's what you do there that counts.

Credentials:
College Grad- Arts
Working abroad for 3 years
Hired primarily on business/extra-curricular activities
Combined salary and perks upon grad > average QC grad.
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A photo of Scrub Scrub
Go to a grad school in the States after your bachelors. Problem solved.
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A photo of onlymatthew onlymatthew
I would say that the most notorious school in Canada is almost quite definitely U of T. I have certain reservations about Rotman itself, but almost everyone knows U of T.

If you mean working out of the country on exchange, I would recommend Queen's. Their exchange program is extremely strong, and they have a decent alumni network that would likely get you to work abroad while still taking your undergrad. I also know that Ivey has an exchange program, but it's not quite as popular.
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A photo of immaculatedx immaculatedx

@g93 wrote

@ktel wrote

@immaculatedx wrote
I'd say Waterloo because of coop.



Bias...



It's a legitimate argument. Most places don't give a sh*t where you got your degree from (especially many years removed from said degree). However, if the work experience on your resume is highlighted by McDonald's, Tim Hortons and Ikea, you are screwed. If your work experience is highlighted by TD Securities, Deloitte Consulting and Barrick Gold, you will have a better chance. It doesn't matter if you came from Carleton or McGill. Waterloo's co-op gives you work experience and their students are able to land pretty impressive jobs. If you are going to rely on the name of your degree to get you places, don't get your hopes up.

Plus I could say bias to you. Same sh*t different pot.



Good points g93, but of course it's bias - I won't deny it.

And besides, when I was referring to coop, I meant that your coop placements could be international. I know of so many kids in Waterloo CS/Math/Engineering who got American coop positions. This is particularly true with the Valley. Bill Gates said himself that Microsoft takes more UW kids that any other school in North America.

If you want finance positions, UW has a lot of American and European coop positions in fields like S&T and other more quanty stuff like Risk Management or even software/cs related finance jobs like algo trading or just being a plain software eng intern at a bank. Banks like Deutche, Barclays, Morgan Stanley, Merill Lynch, Goldman Sachs, Credit Suisse, etc. etc. have hired UW kids for coop but not really for ibanking. If you want foreign investment banking gigs, your best shot is QC or Ivey.
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A photo of ktel ktel

@g93 wrote

@ktel wrote

@immaculatedx wrote
I'd say Waterloo because of coop.



Bias...



It's a legitimate argument. Most places don't give a sh*t where you got your degree from (especially many years removed from said degree). However, if the work experience on your resume is highlighted by McDonald's, Tim Hortons and Ikea, you are screwed. If your work experience is highlighted by TD Securities, Deloitte Consulting and Barrick Gold, you will have a better chance. It doesn't matter if you came from Carleton or McGill. Waterloo's co-op gives you work experience and their students are able to land pretty impressive jobs. If you are going to rely on the name of your degree to get you places, don't get your hopes up.

Plus I could say bias to you. Same sh*t different pot.



No, you made a legitimate argument. immaculatedx made a statement with no reasoning behind it other than "because of coop". That makes it look a little less biased because you're giving an explanation.
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A photo of Nick0rz Nick0rz
McGill and UofT for anything business related. MAYBE Ivey. I've read mixed things on how respected it is out of Canada. Waterloo can make a bit of an argument too I suppose.

If you're doing anything CS related, the UW is certainly the winnar. Silicon Valley <3's UW.
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A photo of goldmansachs goldmansachs
This is such a subjective question, there is no "best" university lol as long as you are going into a respected program and not like Lakehead or something you have a chance of making it abroad. Why would an NYC/London bank hire you when they have Havard, Yale, Stanford, UPenn, LSE grads knocking on their door steps? Not to mention the VISA issues. It's possible but not very realistic.

McGill has a reputation at NYC, but unless you are in the Honors in IM program your chances of making it to an NYC bank are very minimal.

With banks, Ivey is the clear winner. They murder every other Canadian school in IBD/Consulting placements. The iBBA at Schulich is sorta bull, but some students do find placements abroad, lol not in banking though.

I don't know why you are all saying UofT is one of the best, yes it's recognized abroad lmao but they fail at putting their own Rotman students at the big 5 Canadian banks what makes you think students from there will get a job at an NYC bank?

Ivey, McGill IM, UBC Sauder, and Queen's for banking abroad.
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A photo of Illuminar Illuminar

@goldmansachs wrote

With banks, Ivey is the clear winner. They murder every other Canadian school in IBD/Consulting placements. The iBBA at Schulich is sorta bull, but some students do find placements abroad, lol not in banking though.



It's also worth noting that a lot of international placements are students going home. Most of those Singapore and HK placements are people from Singapore and HK. London? A lot of people who are already eligible to work in the EU. That's not always the case, but it's something to consider.
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A photo of cliffhanger33 cliffhanger33
Ivey would be best for out of country in states out of most undergrad business programs in Canada, but you have to be in the 10th percentile to have a shot. It's competitive, coz rlly, you are competing with top tier US schools eg. HYP.
The U.S. offices that recruit on campus are JPM NY, UBS LA, CS LA, CS SF, UBS NY, GS LA, GS SF, GS NY IB, GS NY S&T, HLHZ LA FRG, Bear NY (S&T) and CS UK.

As I read on WSO:
Every Canadian bank (big-6) and practically every US BB/boutique in Toronto comes on campus as well. Teachers PE and CPP PE also take summer students.
Most jobs are IB, with some S&T jobs available at Toronto offices. Out of the US-based offices, only Bear and GS take people for S&T (GS takes for IB and S&T).
All the main consulting firms also come on campus.

I guess Ivey's case method prepares you well for interviews.
Some banks such as UBS LA stopped recruiting Ivey for a year in 2007 due to VISA issues but resumed in 2008?? or smth

It's still extremely competitive for summering in ivey and generally the same people get interviewed for everything, with marginal candidates getting a few interviews. I think I read that about 30 people get IB position in summer.

Anyway in the end its all about how good you are and what you can do to seal the deal.
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A photo of QCman QCman
While picking the right uni can only help you improve your chances of working abroad, the real thing that matters is work experience and the companies on your resume. I grew up travelling around the world and living in other countries and i can tell you that from all the business men i have met, their alma mater doesn't attribute for as much has the companies they have previously worked for. Working for McKinsey is much more important than going to any Canadian uni no matter where you went.

Most students dont get placed outside of Canada when they grad, its happens after a few years in industry, hence focus on the uni's in canada that can get you the best domestic placement because its that placement that matter more later on. Also remember that you have a lot of time to move out of canada and experience the world, be patient and dont be let down by the fact that you dont leave right after grad. Get some experience and then look abroad.

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A photo of illuminati illuminati
Taken from the annual reports from the following business schools:

International Placements for Graduates of the Class of 2010:
McGill (15%)
Ivey (14% with 5% USA)
UBC (11% with 5% USA)
Queen's (9%)
Schulich (?)
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A photo of MINTOK MINTOK
I am planning to work abroad once I graduate and get my CA. I chose Schulich because it has a very successful Alumni abroad and the iBBA program. However, I am mostly relying on work experience to enter the international job market. For example, I want to work at PwC while I am earning my CA designation and it offers great opportunities for working 6-12 months abroad. That's how I want to enter my targeted region, make connection and go back there after I get my CA. :)
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A photo of g93 g93

@QCman wrote
While picking the right uni can only help you improve your chances of working abroad, the real thing that matters is work experience and the companies on your resume. I grew up travelling around the world and living in other countries and i can tell you that from all the business men i have met, their alma mater doesn't attribute for as much has the companies they have previously worked for. Working for McKinsey is much more important than going to any Canadian uni no matter where you went.

Most students dont get placed outside of Canada when they grad, its happens after a few years in industry, hence focus on the uni's in canada that can get you the best domestic placement because its that placement that matter more later on. Also remember that you have a lot of time to move out of canada and experience the world, be patient and dont be let down by the fact that you dont leave right after grad. Get some experience and then look abroad.




This.

An Ivey grad who has worked at JP Morgan, Merill Lynch, Goldman Sachs and McKinsey is far greater than a Rotman grad who has worked at McDonald's, Tim Hortons, RBC and Lionhart. While the Rotman grad is still good, the Ivey grad is much better (assuming they performed fairly equally at their jobs and can both impress in interviews).
Doesn't matter that you go to UofT and they heard of the name. Chances are they have heard of Ivey anyways (depending on who they is).

Canada does not have schools like Harvard/Princeton/Yale/Stanford/MIT either. You are already well behind the elite schools. Being at UofT versus Ivey or Queen's doesn't make that big of a difference. Having brand name companies on your resume will make a much bigger difference.
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A photo of QCman QCman
Yeah just remember that a recruiter in some random country probably has no clue about the rankings of school in Canada, however the name Goldmasach, Mckinsey etc, means something to everyone in industry. As it is, after a few years of working, you undergrads name is not as useful as it used to be, your work experience matter more. And let me stress this part because its the most important:

MOST PEOPLE DO NOT GET JOBS ABROAD RIGHT OUT OF UNDERGRAD, THEY GET WORK EXPERIENCE AND THEN LOOK ABROAD OR APPLY FOR A TRANSFER. GETTING VALUABLE, RECOGNISABLE EXPERIENCE IN CANADA SHOULD BE YOUR PRIORITY TO LAUNCH YOURSELF OUT OF THE COUNTRY.

However just remember that Ivey is actually quite well know in Asia, they have a exec centre in hong kong, and is the Worlds leading producer of Asian market based cases.
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