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Why is Physics required for first year in Life Science?

A photo of Piminion Piminion
Mainly all the universities I've looked into has Physics as a first year course for Life Science. Why is that?

Don't get me wrong but I thought Life Sciences only dealt with Chemistry and Biology. I guess I'm asking this because I haven't taken Physics in Grade 11 and 12.

So, how hard would the Physics course be for someone who doesn't have a background in Physics at all?
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
With few exceptions, both physics and calculus are pretty pointless courses to life science students. I would have a hard time doing anything but very basic physics and calculus, but I have a strong grasp of biology. Whenever basic physics comes up in biology (e.g. current/voltage with neuronal action potentials), no one has a problem learning/re-learning the material.

The physics courses for people who do not did take physics in high school are usually pretty easy. No harder than taking physics in grade 11 and 12.
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A photo of sllencer sllencer
I thought you guys might used differentials with you know...bacteria stuff or w.e. But yeah, supposedly, you guys take physics because of the "thinking" you get from doing physics.
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
Realistically, physics courses require you to practice plugging and chugging equations. Not very applicable to biology.

Idealistically, physics courses develop your ability to solve problems. Too bad we live in the real world, not the ideal one.
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A photo of rightsaidfred rightsaidfred
For the same reason that engineering students, who have more courses per semester than ANY other kind of student, have to STILL take electives in liberal arts/that are not related to engineering.

Why am I supposed to waste my time taking history or a language when I am supposed to take 6 other courses related to my degree?

Christ on a bike.
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A photo of sllencer sllencer
Physics is SO MUCH more than pluging in stuff and solving...high school physics is mainly about that, but the physics in university requires thinking.
And yeah sure, physics approximates some things, but it's not like the results you get from it is useless in the real world.
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A photo of sllencer sllencer

@rightsaidfred wrote
For the same reason that engineering students, who have more courses per semester than ANY other kind of student, have to STILL take electives in liberal arts/that are not related to engineering.

Why am I supposed to waste my time taking history or a language when I am supposed to take 6 other courses related to my degree?

Christ on a bike.




That's sorta different, liberals are meant to be a way for people to branch off, to discover their own sides of interest. Though I agree, engineering course loads are heavy.

On the other hand, calc and physics (at least moderate level of calc and physics) are integral to any science courses.
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A photo of laura14 laura14
I'm at waterloo, some of the life science specialization don't require physics (i.e. biology) but for the life science programs that do you take a physics that doesn't require high school physics. So for anyone who has taken high school physics it's super easy, and if you haven't had previous exposure there are tools (tutors etc.) in place in order for you to do well as long as you work at it.
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A photo of Piminion Piminion

@laura14 wrote
I'm at waterloo, some of the life science specialization don't require physics (i.e. biology) but for the life science programs that do you take a physics that doesn't require high school physics. So for anyone who has taken high school physics it's super easy, and if you haven't had previous exposure there are tools (tutors etc.) in place in order for you to do well as long as you work at it.



I'm actually apply to Waterloo as my first choice for Biomedical Sciences. What program do you take? How's Waterloo in general?
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