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Health & Fitness

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Varsity Swimming
I am currently a grade 12 student and I have been doing competitive swimming on my local team for the past 7 years. I am not the fastest on my team, my times are around regional standard level, and I am contemplating if I should try out for varsity swimming next year. I love swimming but my only concerns are that practices will take up too much of my time and my marks will suffer. Right now I practice about 15 hours/week and school is easy to keep up with, my grades are easily in the high 90's. I am prepared for my average to drop next year, but my goal is to get into medicine or pharmacy post grad so I know I can't let my marks drop too much. I was wondering if anyone had any experience with varsity swimming at either McMaster or Queen's, what is the practice load like, how difficult is it to make the team, when should I reach out to the coach if I do decide I want to swim, and just any other comments or experiences with either of these teams would be super helpful! Thanks :)
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How do you cope with stress?
All of us get stressed. As students, this is typically caused by assignments, tests, and deadlines.

That said, how do you cope with it? What do you do to lower your stress levels? 

It'd be nice to hear from you!

Alyssa
yconic Student Ambassador
University Varsity Sports - Pros and Cons
Hi, I'm considering playing a varsity sport in university and was wondering if anyone could list some pros and cons? I'm worried that it might be too much in my freshman year with the jump from high school, workload wise. I'd like to have a bit of a social life as well.

For context, the sport is field hockey and I'm hoping to get into a nursing program at Queen's, Western, McMaster, U of A, McGill or Calgary (still have to narrow down).

If anyone has any comments or advice, I would be super grateful!

Thank you!
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YorkU Health Studies
Can anyone tell me anything about the program? Do you know anyone in the program?  What is the cut off? What are the courses like...etc....
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Dealing with School, Friends, Extra-Cirricular, and Stress
I'm a high school female student that is very engaged with my school.  I'm on multiple sports teams (Rugby, etc), I'm in a couple clubs (Student Council, etc), and I'm an 90% average student.  I have my own group of friends as well, plus a boyfriend.  It seems perfect right?  Well I am always very anxious and stressed at school and outside of school for the most part.  I use to push it off, but it's getting to the point where I don't enjoy school as much and I'm not spending tons of times with friends.  I haven't been doing as well in my schoolwork and I just don't have the motivation I use to have.  If anyone has recommendations, ideas, or any help, it would be much appreciated!  Thank you!
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New Grad Nurse Blogger
Hey guys, 

I use to answer lots of questions about nursing here on yconic, but I don't go on enough to respond right away. So if you are interested in nursing or are in nursing and want to connect email me at wheresthecharge@gmail.com

Otherwise, you can follow me on my blog which is still a work in progress (I know, I know, don't laugh)
https://wheresthecharge.blogspot.ca

Take care everyone and happy nursing! 
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A good undergrad degree no one talks about
I haven't seen anyone, maybe 1 or 2 people talk about occupational health and safety or public health and safety from Ryerson. I currently know 2 people that graduated with an occ and public health degree and their salaries Are already 84'000-145'000 (the higher one being occ), plus the person with 84k graduated less then 2 years ago. It gets higher after that, plus there are so many jobs for people with this degree.. I didn't really realize until after I reasearched about it. Plus its quite rewarding I heard cause you get to travel around to places and don't just sit in one place everyday. Does anyone have more info, or know people who graduated from said degrees? (I know these two are very different from eachother, but it still falls under the branch of health and safety). Thanks!
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Is kinesology a Useless degree????
I keep hearing that a bachelors in kine. is a useless degree.... someone plz explain to me why its so useless also..... if it is useless then what other options do i have if I'm interested in my sciences and physical health...FYI i intend to go to university...thanks
WESTERN HEALTH SCIENCE
Is anyone a current/past health sci undergrad who could explain exactly what health sci is all about and their personal experience in the program?
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HELP! WESTERN HEALTH SCIENCE

  Hello there!


I have currently been accepted to general sci and health sci at western, and I am having a very tough time choosing the right program. Although, I am not completely sure what I exactly want to pursue in the future, med school is an option and interesting to me. If you are a current western student, please help me decide! I have seen and heard really awesome  and horrible things about both programs so now I am very confused.


THANK YOU

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McMaster Health Science 2nd Year Transfer
Hi!

I got rejected at the level I application and am heading off to Western this coming academic year. I am planning on writing the supp app for level II transfer although I don't have much hope about it. Just wondering if anyone knows the approximate number of applicants each year for the level II transfer? Also, I need some advice on whether it is a good idea to go all the way from london to hamilton for it... 
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Can this one song really reduce your stress and anxiety by 65%?
Let me be honest here. University is difficult and the course load comes with its fair share of stress. As stress and depression levels continue to increase, it goes without question that mental health is becoming a larger and larger issue amongst post secondary institutes across the nation.

But what if there was a song that could reduce your stress just by listening to it?

Well you could be in luck! Check out this song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=55&v=UfcAVejslrU 
 
The creators of the song worked alongside sound therapists in order to create a harmony that would decrease cortisol levels, slow down one’s heart rate, and reduce one’s blood pressure. Studies have shown that is had been able to effectively reduce the stress of individuals by up to 65%! 

Did listening to the song help you or is this just a gimmick of an idea? Share your thoughts in the comment section below. 

Mathieu 
yconic Student Ambassador
Are fitness classes at Carleton free for Carleton students?
From my understanding, gym access is free for students currently attending Carleton, but what about the classes?
I'm talking about stuff like yoga, zumba, and pilates. Don't comment if you're going to be rude and useless. <3
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How Sports Can Lead to Better Academic Performance
Lots of people drop out of sports and don’t participate in physical activity because of the extra time commitment. Who wants to spend time sweating when you have multiple exams to study for? However, there are multiple benefits to juggling the two disciplines, including:

  1. Time Management: I remember once in high school I had to skip track practice because I had a major assignment due the next day in one of my classes. The next day at practice, my coach told me that doing homework was not an acceptable excuse to skip practice and to get better time management skills. As my coach can be kind of scary, never again did I skip practice for school, and my marks didn’t suffer the consequence either. I have become better organized, self-disciplined, and more time efficient from balancing my sport and school workload.

2. Focus: Mental training is a huge component of any sport. You have to be able to block out any distractions keeping you from performing at your best. This can be really handy when you need to buckle down on an assignment or stay focused during an exam. 

3. Decrease Stress: It is well known that physical activity is positively associated with reducing stress levels. Exercise is a huge benefit to reducing the stress associated with being a student. 

4. Communication: You need to be able to communicate effectively with your coach and teammates in order to achieve success. Communication is a crucial skill to have when you have a group project or need to network. 

5. Confidence: Sport is a great way to build your self-esteem and confidence levels. Having a good self-image will benefit you in all aspects of life, including the classroom.

6. Scholarships: Sports look great when applying for scholarships. The more scholarship money you receive, the less you will have to work to pay for school. The less you work, the more time you will have to work on your grades. 

 If sports aren’t your thing, staying physically active is also great for academic success and health! 

-Michelle Young, yconic student ambassador
National Nutrition Month for a Busy Student
Did you know that March is national nutrition month? Dieticians Canada has started a campaign dedicated to supporting Canadians “take the fight out of food.” Here are some helpful tips to help take the fight out of food this March break and stay healthy for the rest of the school year:

1. Download an app to help you out: Dieticians Canada recommends Cookspiration which contains over 300 healthy recipes that are easy to make! If you live off ramen noodles, I recommend downloading the Rockin Ramen app which has a number of recipes that sneak in some nutritious ingredients. Carrot is another app I would recommend which finds easy recipes to make with ingredients you already have in your fridge!

  2. Pack a healthy lunch: Packing your own lunch is the best way to control what goes in your body and is also a great way to save money!

3. Carry snacks with you: As a busy student, it is convenient to grab a bag of chips from a vending machine for a mid-afternoon snack. However, vending machines and school cafeterias don’t always offer the healthiest of options. Instead, try planning ahead and pack some healthy snacks such as an apple or protein bar to give you some extra energy on the go. 

4. Cook once, eat multiple times: Most students don’t have the time to prep before every meal. Instead, make a big batch of your favorite meal and divide it up into multiple Tupperware containers. Now you have healthy meals for the next couple of days! Dividing up your meal into servings is also a good way to prevent yourself from overeating.

  5. Choose foods that you like: Healthy eating doesn’t have to be something you dread. Try making meals with foods you like instead of forcing yourself to eat kale just because it is a healthy choice.

  -Michelle Young, yconic student ambassador
ryerson: Nutrition (BASc)
Hey guys, can you guys tell me more about ryerson's nutrition program? any labs? other than dietician, career options? any info u have will do :)
Calling all yconic members!
We know it’s hard to think about but it’s almost that time of year again. Tell us your top 3 “Must Haves” for back to school and you could be featured in yconic's newest article.

Example:              1. My trusty Herschel backpack
                               2. Red TOMS shoes
                               3. My lucky pen
                              ~Jon, first year Queen’s student in Economics

Reply to this thread now for your chance to be featured!
March Break for the Non-Traveler
March break is known for people flying off to exotic destinations in hope of escaping the cold and/or stresses of life back home. However, travel is not for everyone. If you are a non-traveler here are some tips on what to do this March break:

1. Catch up on school work: If you are behind on your school work or would like to boost your average in hopes of getting into post-secondary school, dedicate some time this break towards bettering your study habits! Reviewing, organizing and making study notes will better prepare you for the last few months of school and towards acing those final exams.

2. Job shadowing: If you have connections in the area you are interested in studying, I would suggest spending a few days in the life of a professional. Real-life experience is the best way to find out if you will enjoy a particular career. There is nothing worse than getting half way through your practicum at the end of your degree to find out your dream job isn’t what you expected. 

3. Be Active: There are a whole bunch of ways to have fun while staying active instead of counting down the minutes you spend on a treadmill. I recommend trying something new to keep a variety in your workout routine to prevent boredom. If weather permits try skating, skiing/ snowboarding, horseshoeing, rock climbing, or go dancing. There are tons of ways to stay active if you don’t like the traditional gym setting.

4. Explore your own city: You don’t have to travel somewhere new to sightsee and have fun exploring. Chances are there are a bunch of fun things to do in your hometown or city. I would recommend visiting a new museum (or one you haven’t visited since childhood), trying a new restaurant, or hitting up some live entertainment. The possibilities are endless!

5. Catch up with friends and family: Sometimes when you get caught up with your school work and extracurricular activities/ jobs you don’t have the time to spend quality time with your loved ones. March break is an excellent time to do something fun or catch up with someone you haven’t seen or talked to in a while.

How do you plan on spending your March break?

  -Michelle Young, yconic student ambassador
What should you eat before exams?
Did you know, what you eat before an exam can impact how well you will do on the exam? Here are my top nutrition tips to help you ace your next exam:

1. Do not skip breakfast: Breakfast is the most important meal of the day and your brain needs energy to reach its full potential. If you are nervous and have a hard time eating before an exam, try sipping on a smoothie.

2. Eat a balanced meal: Try eating a healthy balance of protein, carbs, and fats. Grabbing a muffin for breakfast will leave you hungry in no time as you need protein and healthy fats to sustain your hunger. Healthy fats are also great for brain health! I recommend having a couple of eggs with a side of fruit and whole grain toast! 

3. Eat foods that benefit brain health: Healthy fats and fruits and veggies are known to boost memory and focus! Have a sweet tooth? Dark chocolate is a healthy brain food as it is full of antioxidants.

4. Don’t Eat foods, that don’t sit well with your stomach: If you have a history of foods that upset your stomach, avoid them the day of your exam to prevent having to run to the bathroom mid-exam. 

5. Stay away from processed and sugary foods: Besides being bad for your health, sugar is actually known to impair your memory and learning skills. Beware of that double-double you order from Tim’s if you like getting that last minute caffeine fix to keep you awake after a long night of studying.

  6. Pack a snack: If you find yourself focusing on your growling stomach instead of your exam, a small snack may come in handy as fast fuel to get you through your exam. Just remember to pack something that won’t be distracting to other. Crunchy carrots may not be the best option. Instead, try packing a banana or a granola bar.

7. Stay hydrated: Water is essential for your whole body to function properly so sip up! I hope this helps as you eat your way to your next A on your exam! 

-Michelle Young, yconic student ambassador
McMaster Health Science 2017 Supp App
Hey everyone, I'm applying to McMaster's Health Science program and was wondering if anyone who is also applying has started their supplementary application.
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Are the Stresses of Midterms Getting you Down?
Are the stresses of midterms getting you down? Here are a few tips to help minimize your stress over the next few weeks!

1. Keep a day planner: Time management is number one on my list because for me if I am organized my stress is better well managed. I keep a day planner with all my assignment due dates, commitments, and class schedule. If I can see ahead of time that I have an assignment due during a busy week, I can plan ahead and prevent the stress from building up. 

2. Find your happy place: Make time for something you truly enjoy and makes you happy. For me, I find baking and art to be relaxing activities that I enjoy and reduce my stress levels. However, everyone is different so whether you enjoy listening to music or watching movies with your friends, make sure you spend some time on you!

3. Do not procrastinate: This is the easiest thing to do as a student yet is one of the top causes of stress. I know how easy it is to say, “I am not going to procrastinate” and still end up scrambling the night before a due date finishing up an assignment. However, preventing a stressful situation by getting your work done ahead of time feels great!

4. Exercise: Sweat out your stress at your school fitness center or by joining a recreation sports team. Exercise reduces your stress both physically and mentally. Physically, exercise releases endorphins that make you feel good after working out and it’s great for your health. Mentally, exercise is a good way to let go of any tension or anxiety building up inside your body.

5. Get a good night’s sleep: When sleep deprivation hits, everything seems to be more stressful that it really should be. Getting a good night’s sleep helps me feel refreshed and energized to take on whatever the day may throw at me. 

6. Don’t overdo it: It is easy to overcommit yourself, especially if you are a yes man (or woman). Even though it is hard saying no, it could be beneficial to your health depending on the situation. If you are constantly on the go and feel like you don’t have enough time in the day, you may feel yourself feeling stressed over time. Finding a well-balanced schedule is key to reducing your stress levels. 

7. Have fun! Laughter truly is the best medicine.

  Michelle Young, yconic student ambassador 
Advice for medical undergrad programs!
Hi, I am a grade 10 student looking to pursue a career in the medical field. I am not sure exactly what type of doctor I would like to be yet. I know it’s a bit early but I’d like to have as much information as possible to be well prepared when the time comes to apply to universities. I have a few questions and any information will be much appreciated. Not all questions have to be answered, but the more the better. 

1) What are the best life science/ health science universities in Ontario? 
2) In your opinion, what average do you think I would need to attain to be considered as a competitive applicant for those universities? 
3) What are these universities looking for in terms of great ECs and leadership roles? 
4) I’m interested in Life Science and Health Science but what are the main differences between the two? What career paths could they lead me to? 
5) How would you rank these universities in terms of workload?
6) Overall, what university would you recommend and how would you rank them from best to worst? 
7) Any other good Universities in Ontario? 
8) Any general tips for someone wanted to be very successful in the medical field. I know it’s early and I have no clue where specifically I’m headed, but I’m trying to figure things out. 

Thank you!
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First year Med Sci student, happy to answer questions!
UPDATE: keep track of my journey through my blog (https://followmetomd.wordpress.com/)! After numerous comments on this forum, I decided to start up my own blog to help guide all that are interested in pursuing medicine, and keep you guys updated on my journey. Follow my blog, and do not hesitate to leave comments with questions, comments, suggestions that you may have. Cheers!

Hi, I am currently attending University of Western Ontario for the Medical Sciences Program.
I am happy to answer any questions that anyone may have about the program, course load, and overall experience at Western! 

A bit about myself:
I attended a high school within Ontario and received my acceptance to Med Sci in January (or early February?). I was also accepted to multiple science programs from other universities including, but not limited to: U of T, Waterloo, York, McMaster, Queen's, Ryerson, and Guelph. 


Post questions down below and I will try to get back to you as soon as possible! 
How is SFU education??? or health sciences?
I am thinking about applying to BGS, however, I like sciences more. Is it true that general studies allows students to take courses outside of the faculty? OR all the students have to take education related courses? BTW, can a health sciences student minor in education?
Tips for Staying Stress Free as a Student
Finals are coming to an end, and you may be waving goodbye to your stress as you begin to celebrate the holiday season. However, next semester (sadly) will be here before you know it! Here are some tips to stay stress-free when things get busy again in the new year!

1. Keep a day planner: Time management is number one on my list because for me if I am organized my stress is better well managed. I keep a day planner with all my assignment due dates, commitments, and class schedule. If I can see ahead of time that I have an assignment due during a busy week, I can plan ahead and prevent the stress from building up. 
2. Find your happy place: Make time for something you truly enjoy and makes you happy. For me, I find baking and art to be relaxing activities that I enjoy and reduce my stress levels. However, everyone is different so whether you enjoy listening to music or watching movies with your friends, make sure you spend some time on you!
  3. Do not procrastinate: This is the easiest thing to do as a student yet is one of the top causes of stress. I know how easy it is to say, “I am not going to procrastinate” and still end up scrambling the night before a due date finishing up an assignment. However, preventing a stressful situation by getting your work done ahead of time feels great!
4. Exercise: Sweat out your stress at your school fitness center or by joining a recreation sports team. Exercise reduces your stress both physically and mentally. Physically, exercise releases endorphins that make you feel good after working out and it’s great for your health. Mentally, exercise is a good way to let go of any tension or anxiety building up inside your body.
5. Get a good night’s sleep: When sleep deprivation hits, everything seems to be more stressful that it really should be. Getting a good night’s sleep helps me feel refreshed and energized to take on whatever the day may throw at me. 
6. Don’t overdo it: It is easy to overcommit yourself, especially if you are a yes man (or woman). Even though it is hard saying no, it could be beneficial to your health depending on the situation. If you are constantly on the go and feel like you don’t have enough time in the day, you may feel yourself feeling stressed over time. Finding a well-balanced schedule is key to reducing your stress levels. 
7. Have fun! Laughter truly is the best medicine. 

I hope these tips are helpful whether you are trying to stay stress-free juggling multiple classes or just trying to better your health. Maybe even make it your New Year’s resolution to better your health by managing your stress next semester!

Michelle Young, yconic student ambassador